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Guest rmpfyf

Tasso, read that some time ago - started with system latency effects, didn't quite finish it, and got into jitter more broadly.

 

I can/have provided feedback on SQ with system latency on my PC. Below a certain threshold doubling the average and the spread are very clearly audible here. My numbers are well under those posted by Chanh during playback.

 

That's my mileage. System latency isn't audio latency necessarily, and there are other ways around the problem to some ends. Right now, for instance, my transport has limited buffering capabilities...

 

I'm not getting a Hashi/JS2 power supply because I simply can't afford it, and I'd look for another way. That's how my system's been built. It doesn't discredit your efforts, or anyone else's experiences.

 

Tomorrow I should be running Snakeoil. Keen to hear it.

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I posted this on the server thread but thought thought it deserved its own thread. IMO, it beats Daphile, Vortexbox , Audiophile Linux and others. And it can play J-river too ( licence needed).It

Well said @@Rob181. Everyone, could we please keep this thread about Snake Oil software. How we use it and our listening experiences. It could really grow in to a valuable resource for a lot more pe

Mission critical real time computers for industrial applications  have no real relevance to audio

 

Why?    The rest of your post didn't provide a justification  (aside from restating some goals).    Are you claiming that 'real time computers for industrial applications' will not meet these goals?   Why?

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You have said nothing other than confirm you have nothing useful to say.

 

My gut reaction is to be perplexed that you are not interested in why he believes that you are incorrect to generalise about "real time computers for industrial applications"    

<shrug>

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I personally feel as though after a certain point latency is a red herring for audio

 

I agree.    It is worth looking at, as it can be a symptom ....  but it's absolute relevance to sound quality can't be generalised as that depends on things which happen downstream from the computer, ie. what reclocking and how.    If there is very large jitter, not every solution can deal with this.

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Why?    The rest of your post didn't provide a justification  (aside from restating some goals).    Are you claiming that 'real time computers for industrial applications' will not meet these goals?   Why?

 

No Dave.  I'm simply stating that the requirements for  industrial applications are built for a purpose  which does not include providing the best sound quality. This is not to say that there are no commonalities between the requirements but  they are not the standard by which audio servers are judged

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My gut reaction is to be perplexed that you are not interested in why he believes that you are incorrect to generalise about "real time computers for industrial applications"    

<shrug>

 

 

Your gut is wrong.   i do understand the correlation he is trying to make but don't believe it to be relevant. 

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so your theories can be put to the test. Until then, armchair criticism is pretty useless really

 

I found that there was sometimes very significant difference between the performance of converters when exposed to a computer.

 

However, posting up objective results would be a very significant amount of work (and they are unlikely to be complete anyways -> this was ~6 years ago).

 

 

 

I'm not sure that most of the reclocking out there is sufficient to handle such sporadic low frequency jitter.

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I agree.    It is worth looking at, as it can be a symptom ....  but it's absolute relevance to sound quality can't be generalised as that depends on things which happen downstream from the computer, ie. what reclocking and how.    If there is very large jitter, not every solution can deal with this.

 

I tend to agree. Dynamically, clock output is still (to a very tiny degree) a function of clock input. and (to a very large degree) the local operating environment, including (particularly) noise. Jacking a femtoclock into something isn't a panacea.

 

How many times have we seen reclocking touted as the end-all solution to input jitter? Remember how the Benchmark DAC1 was advertised? Turned out to be highly input sensitive. So, yes, you might contrive a system in which latency isn't that big a deal, but I think it will never be entirely unimportant. And that wouldn't support a generalisation: generally, latency does matter, and it's without doubt good practice to lower it. For instance, the Gen III T1 (produced from 2011-2013) had a rock steady 1-2µS DPC latency, and was probably (but coincidentally) the best-sounding recipe we published.

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Why?    The rest of your post didn't provide a justification  (aside from restating some goals).    Are you claiming that 'real time computers for industrial applications' will not meet these goals?   Why?

 

 

You have the issue the wrong way around. If you want to argue that the industrial computers sound best for audio then you must be prepared to prove that.   I'm way past theorising and report what we have actually done  So how about a  providing a demo?

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Guest rmpfyf

I tend to agree. Dynamically, clock output is still (to a very tiny degree) a function of clock input. and (to a very large degree) the local operating environment, including (particularly) noise. Jacking a femtoclock into something isn't a panacea.

 

How many times have we seen reclocking touted as the end-all solution to input jitter? Remember how the Benchmark DAC1 was advertised? Turned out to be highly input sensitive. So, yes, you might contrive a system in which latency isn't that big a deal, but I think it will never be entirely unimportant. And that wouldn't support a generalisation: generally, latency does matter, and it's without doubt good practice to lower it. For instance, the Gen III T1 (produced from 2011-2013) had a rock steady 1-2µS DPC latency, and was probably (but coincidentally) the best-sounding recipe we published.

 

(Just so it's unambiguous)

 

Jitter is unavoidable. Latency isn't the end of all things, nor do the same relative differences in latency numbers yield the same effect on all CA rigs. Low latency is a good thing.

 

The comment was initially made as the numbers posted by Chanh were extremely high for a lightly-loaded RT box. It was also stressed at the time that the last word in system latency does not imply a causal effect on audio latency, it's simply indicative of a set of kernel behaviours. 

 

It's key to appreciate on a PC that there is no hardware clock reference that's audio-grade. Whatever mechanisms are used are broadly software-resolved. Most OSs and OS kernels can be tuned to significant ends to improve timing performance.

 

Good power capability aids in meeting load variance, which can affect system latency... the benefit being (broadly) proportionate to variance in load state.

 

Downstream problems are certainly separate.

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Finally threw my atom-based pc together (with Js-2 and SoTM pcie sub and clock boards, jcat usb cable) yesterday and listened to snake oil and wtfplayer vs a highly sorted CEC tl-1 transport into a line magnetic dac.

It's early days, but the CEC won easily. I can't help but wonder if the xmos usb input board on the dac is a bottleneck.

Had a funny experience with snake oil. Fired it up, configured it with mpd, and then realised I had no idea how to play music! After some quick googling, couldn't get any flac files playing... Then went to something more familiar: squeeelite, but couldn't get any sound out using the web interface via an iPad. Fired up ipeng on my phone, and ... Music at last!

Compared to the disc spinner, the sound was a bit thin and distant.

Round 1 to the CEC, but I'm keen to repeat the test with a different dac.

Edited by Sir Rab of Everest
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Finally threw my atom-based pc together (with Js-2 and SoTM pcie sub and clock boards, jcat usb cable) yesterday and listened to snake oil and wtfplayer vs a highly sorted CEC tl-1 transport into a line magnetic dac.

It's early days, but the CEC won easily. I can't help but wonder if the xmos usb input board on the dac is a bottleneck.

Had a funny experience with snake oil. Fired it up, configured it with mpd, and then realised I had no idea how to play music! After some quick googling, couldn't get any flac files playing... Then went to something more familiar: squeeelite, but couldn't get any sound out using the web interface via an iPad. Fired up ipeng on my phone, and ... Music at last!

Compared to the disc spinner, the sound was a bit thin and distant.

Round 1 to the CEC, but I'm keen to repeat the test with a different dac.

 

 

I think a decent CD spinner into a well sorted DAC is hard to beat with any CA combo.  

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How many times have we seen reclocking touted as the end-all solution to input jitter? Remember how the Benchmark DAC1 was advertised? Turned out to be highly input sensitive.

 

For this context 'jitter' is a big useless catch all word like 'distortion'    (as in jitter isn't a single thing, it's a whole spectrum of possible timing errors) ..... obviously different re-clocking schemes work to varying degrees (depending on the nature of the timing errors).

 

But I'm always provoked by blanket claims that time-domain stuff 'can't matter', because in some circumstances, and some systems it probably will.

 

Hmmm.    I would take that statement a lot further.

 

Aside from power quality (at the converter), the "time-domain stuff" (measured at the converter) is the only thing which matters.

 

 

... anyone saying it "can't matter" is either being taken out of context, or are so very very far off the mark.

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Hmmm.    I would take that statement a lot further.

 

Aside from power quality (at the converter), the "time-domain stuff" (measured at the converter) is the only thing which matters.

 

 

... anyone saying it "can't matter" is either being taken out of context, or are so very very far off the mark.

 

100% agree with you there Dave, but I am not convinced that computer issues (eg. power supply) affects only the timing of the dac...I am sure it is possible for it to also affect the amplifiers (mains influence or perhaps RFI).

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You have the issue the wrong way around. If you want to argue that the industrial computers sound best for audio then you must be prepared to prove that.   I'm way past theorising and report what we have actually done  So how about a  providing a demo?

 

Ooookkkaaayyy then.  :S

 

I don't have any issue any way around.   You made a claim.   I asked you why you made it.

 

I asked because I'm interested  ....   especially seeing as how firmly and generally you've made the claim.  You make it sound like you know something, and if that's the case, I'd like to know it too.

 

 

I'm way past theorising and report what we have actually done

 

What are you trying to say to me?

 

 

So how about a  providing a demo?

 

Of what?    I've seen and heard of x86 industrial platform boards being used for audio.    Hypothetically if one was "demoed" and it could provide well above average (but not 'best') quality .... then what would that "prove"?  (you throw that word around like it's a dime a dozen)

 

 

 

... but back to reality, I'm just simply interested in why you think an "industrial board" wouldn't be any good.    (I'm assuming your reasons have merit, and could be worth considering - otherwise I wouldn't ask).

 

<facepalm> ?

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Mission critical real time computers for industrial applications  have no real relevance to audio . With audio, we are not only concerned that all the analog voltage pulses (representing digits) that arrive at the DAC in the best order possible, but also that the  electrical signal carrying the voltage pulses that will enter the DAC and flow through it will  be as clean as possible and have the least possible distortion  to minimise adverse sonic effects.  A server may be made of computer parts but it is an audio device and all the factors affecting audio must be taken into account.

 

Tasso, what I'm asking is if you could elaborate on the above a little - so I can understand what it is specifically about "mission critical real time computers for industrial applications"

 

 

Why aren't they relevant to audio? .... which may flow into the second question....  Why would they distort a digital signal?  (if that is what you're implying).

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As we can't seem to get back OT, I'll bow out. I'll be trialing Snakeoil tomorrow, anyone wanting my feedback is welcome to PM.

 

:/    I do agree with your whole post

 

 

his recommendations and opinions are based on what he sells

 

I would only assume that he recommends what he sells, because he believes in what he sells...   and so the scene is more complex than simply 'shilling'.    I would be quite perplexed otherwise.

 

It's interesting and instructive to read the justifications for whatever approach people take.    Those justifications can be tested, understood, repurposed, etc. etc.   (they are potential wisdom)

 

 

criticised tangible achievements

 

I'm sorry, I simply don't see where, he's simply offered his own experience / logic / knowledge / wisdom....   he's made no claim that what you've done is no good... nor made an claims that what he's attempting to contribute is "the only way".....   the topic is too much "it depends" for him to do otherwise.

 

 

Linux (can't sell)

 

Of course you can!

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100% agree with you there Dave, but I am not convinced that computer issues (eg. power supply) affects only the timing of the dac...I am sure it is possible for it to also affect the amplifiers (mains influence or perhaps RFI).

 

Sure.   (I wasn't specifically trying to preclude it having an effect elsewhere outside of computers and converters)

 

Electrical issues inside the computer could be having an effect elsewhere (anywhere).    Seems unlikely in all but the most touchy amplifier, but....

 

Power issues are a lot bigger deal for a converter - small deviations can end up looking like wander on the digital signal, and such very low frequency issues are poorly attenuated by most reclocking.

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Tasso, what I'm asking is if you could elaborate on the above a little - so I can understand what it is specifically about "mission critical real time computers for industrial applications"

 

 

Why aren't they relevant to audio? .... which may flow into the second question....  Why would they distort a digital signal?  (if that is what you're implying).

Most of the industrial (business) computers I have seen have been installed even without an audio side at all to them.

I see no purpose for the companies to spend any money or need perfect audio in a server.

Am I missing what you are trying to say?

 

You spend the big bucks on industrial PC's for reliability and hopefully they won't break down as quick running them 24/7.

Edited by rocky500
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For this context 'jitter' is a big useless catch all word like 'distortion'    (as in jitter isn't a single thing, it's a whole spectrum of possible timing errors) ..... obviously different re-clocking schemes work to varying degrees (depending on the nature of the timing errors).

 

 

Hmmm.    I would take that statement a lot further.

 

Aside from power quality (at the converter), the "time-domain stuff" (measured at the converter) is the only thing which matters.

 

 

... anyone saying it "can't matter" is either being taken out of context, or are so very very far off the mark.

 

There is an argument that power issues matter only because they create time domain issues . . . but, like I said, the really interesting thing about computer audio as it's developed over the past 15 years is that it's now broad enough to contain contradictions: it's possible to take slightly different routes to good outcomes. For instance, you can focus solely on software (like HQPLayer and Linux developers) or uniquely on hardware, and make useful progress.

 

It seems common sense that the best products will combine attention to detail to everything that matters - which seems to be just about everything! No shortcuts.

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Finally threw my atom-based pc together (with Js-2 and SoTM pcie sub and clock boards, jcat usb cable) yesterday and listened to snake oil and wtfplayer vs a highly sorted CEC tl-1 transport into a line magnetic dac.

It's early days, but the CEC won easily. I can't help but wonder if the xmos usb input board on the dac is a bottleneck.

Had a funny experience with snake oil. Fired it up, configured it with mpd, and then realised I had no idea how to play music! After some quick googling, couldn't get any flac files playing... Then went to something more familiar: squeeelite, but couldn't get any sound out using the web interface via an iPad. Fired up ipeng on my phone, and ... Music at last!

Compared to the disc spinner, the sound was a bit thin and distant.

Round 1 to the CEC, but I'm keen to repeat the test with a different dac.

Many thanks for your feedbacks!

The Agent Kith had quickly responded with an update on his software. There is a newer ISO image with kernel 3.12 and the latest mpd version. He had spent his Sunday afternoon right after reading your post work out away it could improve your listening experience. There will also be a revised manual with mpd thereafter on how to.

Please download the new ISO for atom and re-assess?!

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Well said @@Rob181.

Everyone, could we please keep this thread about Snake Oil software. How we use it and our listening experiences.

It could really grow in to a valuable resource for a lot more people if we do.

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So if I wanted to buy a motherboard to use with Snakeoil, what would people currently recommend?

 

These came up in a search

http://mini-box.com.au/Intel%20Atom%20Mount.html

 

I bought the Intel 2800 mboard, largely based on this thread (and given ther unavailability of SoTM PCI (as opposed to PCIe) cards.

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The Agent Kith had quickly responded with an update on his software. There is a newer ISO image with kernel 3.12 and the latest mpd version. He had spent his Sunday afternoon right after reading your post work out away it could improve your listening experience. There will also be a revised manual with mpd thereafter on how to.

Please download the new ISO for atom and re-assess?!

 

Hi Chanh, many thanks to you and Agent Kith!

 

I will do so, although probably can't test it until next weekend. I have no idea why mpd wasn't working for me. I downloaded an mpd client onto an iPad: it seemed access the server, said it was creating the database etc, but then there were no artist/album/song entries to select. I was expecting a local client, and I see there was (an ncurses) one but it didn't seem to work.

 

Incidentally, right at the end I remembered wtfplayer and tried that quickly. The impression I had is that it sounded a little better than squeezelite on snakeoil, but I only had time to test it on one track. Next time.

 

Thanks again!

 

- r

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Hi Chanh, many thanks to you and Agent Kith!

I will do so, although probably can't test it until next weekend. I have no idea why mpd wasn't working for me. I downloaded an mpd client onto an iPad: it seemed access the server, said it was creating the database etc, but then there were no artist/album/song entries to select. I was expecting a local client, and I see there was (an ncurses) one but it didn't seem to work.

Incidentally, right at the end I remembered wtfplayer and tried that quickly. The impression I had is that it sounded a little better than squeezelite on snakeoil, but I only had time to test it on one track. Next time.

Thanks again!

- r

Rab,

With MPD, I use MpaD for iPad and MPoD(free from AppStore) for iPhone. No artworks unfortunately.

Typically, you should "update the database" in the setting, follow by "refresh local cache". Wait it few minutes, the library should be there in your remote app. To hear music, you must ensure the output is selected.

Should try the new ISO image. It is to my ears much more natural then kernel 3.03. Keen hearing back your new feedbacks on new ISO.

Hope it helps?

fbfa73b5e3ef700b2b85c936c0ac83a8.jpg

7fc1c3cca616dea9894eb6a60fe19095.jpg

1776246bdf8cf92bb539ea4b68ea5a96.jpg

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Hi Chanh, many thanks to you and Agent Kith!

 

I will do so, although probably can't test it until next weekend. I have no idea why mpd wasn't working for me. I downloaded an mpd client onto an iPad: it seemed access the server, said it was creating the database etc, but then there were no artist/album/song entries to select. I was expecting a local client, and I see there was (an ncurses) one but it didn't seem to work.

 

Incidentally, right at the end I remembered wtfplayer and tried that quickly. The impression I had is that it sounded a little better than squeezelite on snakeoil, but I only had time to test it on one track. Next time.

 

Thanks again!

 

- r

Rab,

What Chanh said but before you try that, note that I also use DN2800 mobo with SOtM PCIe+clock and had exact same problem as you with MPD. The issue was resolved by switching to any of the 3 newer kernels.

 

Rather than going to the new iso, there is another way:

Follow online instructions to update the firmware and then switch to another kernel.

 

Also IMO the SOtM PCIe+clock sounded better after a few days burn in, so keep it running.

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Am I missing what you are trying to say?

 

Yes, I think so.   I'm not trying to say anything.

 

I'm asking Tasso what he knows that's wrong with them.

 

 

Most of the industrial (business) computers I have seen have been installed even without an audio side at all to them.

 

Depending on what you mean by "audio side" .... then this could be a good thing.    (ie.  there's no audio controller anywhere in the motherboard)

 

All you need is a USB, firewire, PCI, or whatever you are plugging your audio hardware into.

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I'm asking Tasso what he knows that's wrong with them.

 

 

We are only using computer parts because we dont have the expertise to build  new  machines from scratch like Aurender, JFdigital , Linn , Naim etc have done.   Thinking of the best music server as being the best computer is a mistake  because  what sounds better from the perspective of audio does not necessarily follow what is best practice in the computing world. . The critical issue here is not the ability to operate reliably in mission critical real time applications, but to sound better than other motherboards. 

 

There is really not much more to say other than nothing should be assumed to be suitable for audio until it has proven to be the case in practice.  

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Great.  So nothing in general to detract from the concept then?!?     There's a lot of this on the horizon  (small boards with very few protocols and connectors, intended for applications other than a 'regular computer').

 

 

My last foray into this sort of thing was redirecting pulseaudio over the network to a little SoC running only USB and Ethernet, and tinkering around with power and shielding, etc.....    It had just been pulled into major distros, and I just realised how long ago that was (time flies, feels like just yesterday)

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 Snakeoil  beta release 0.1.2  seems like a  worthwhile improvement.   Dynamics seem to hit harder with improved overall resolution.   The browser interface can also be accessed using  "computer name".local  as the destination without having to use IP address.   However, I did need to use VNC for installation since mouse wouldn't work with my setup. This will no doubt be addressed in the next release.

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Just had another go installing (actually running off a usb stick) snakeoil.

I got it to work this time.

I am not a linux user and was looking for a file explorer or player on the snakoil machine itself to find and play my files.

I now realise this sets up the snakoil machine to be used by another machine.

So downloaded Gmpc portable on my other windows machine and control all my files on the snakeoil PC with this other PC. 

 

Sounds very dynamic but only just got it working and have new speakers since last night. So will need some time to get used to the sound of the new speakers first.

Also I feel I must be in the poor quality sound group (so it seems from others posting here on SNA) as I use USB. Sounds great to me anyway, so no need for me to change my Dac. :)

Edited by rocky500
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Also I feel I must be in the poor quality sound group (so it seems from others posting here on SNA) as I use USB. 

 

Don't think anyone posting here on SNA has suggested USB is poor quality.

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Don't think anyone posting here on SNA has suggested USB is poor quality.

 

I had to do a search but I did find this one below

"USB is a crap interface not designed for audio made almost good by the work of many people. For audiophiles it is literally a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Few people realise how easy it is to drop bits in asynchronous USB. If you can handle SPDIF and re-clock it properly, it will slay USB most of the time. I2S native just has lesser steps. USB is an extra series of steps we should want to avoid. It wins only in convenience. "

 

Anyway, this should be a thread about snakeoil and peoples feedback on it.

Edited by rocky500
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[moderator post] locking this thread for the moment, while decide what to do. Guys this thread is a mess. We can clean it up removing all the accusations and personal affronts. Or some restraint can be shown going forward. Perhaps something to think about. Maybe a pause for thought might help this thread resume on a reasonable basis. If there is something to be dealt with please use the report function for us to deal with, as getting personal such as been going on is not tolerated. [end moderator post]

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[moderator post] Hi all, reopening this thread after quite  clean up, am sure theres some collateral. this is a popular thread with a few followers can I suggest if posting here, as per my post above, please keep it on topic, without the personal jibes and accusations. if have some concern please use the report function instead [end moderator post]

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you press the little report button on the bottom right of a post, to the left of the edit button, e.g. in yours,

 

 

post-125306-0-13156000-1458991306_thumb.

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Please download the new ISO for atom and re-assess?!
 

 

OK, i did, but same result: LMS/iPeng works just fine, but nothing else seems to work. MPoD crashed a few times and tends to hang for extended periods... I even tried XMMS this time, but nothing comes up on the (local) display. Tried to connect with VNC, but it seems the port was not open...

 

What Chanh said but before you try that, note that I also use DN2800 mobo with SOtM PCIe+clock and had exact same problem as you with MPD. The issue was resolved by switching to any of the 3 newer kernels.

 

In view of my experience, it seems you are correct. By "3 newer kernels", i assume you mean 3.16, 3.19, or 4.2?

 

I would do that, but I do not know what optimisations Agent Kith has applied: I assume it's more than just compiling a real-time kernel with 64-bit intel CPU selection...?

 

Tomorrow I will try a manual debian install and see where that gets me...

Edited by Sir Rab of Everest
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      Fully automatic CD Ripper (insert & rip) with external DVD Error correction and AccurateRip audio check Internet access to premium databases: Discogs, GD3, SonataDB (Classical), Freedb and Musicbrainz PerfectMeta software picks and merges metadata results from each database to bring you the best metadata results in the industry Extended metadata fields support (up to 18) for all music genres: Composer, Period, Instrument, etc., a unique feature, and still a market first available for ANY genre with manual tagging  
      Gapless playback Crossfade in playback Play files from memory Multizone streaming using UPnP/DLNA compatible renderers Play from external NAS Play to tablet and any other compatible device Automatic output sampling frequency switching Multi Channel support via USB Support for uncompressed (WAV, AIFF) and lossless formats (FLAC, ALAC) DXD (32bit/352.8KHz) files Support DSD and DSD x 2 files support Bit Perfect support (ASIO, WASAPI and Kernel streaming)  
       
      Internal storage: 2TB HDD DAC 32bits-384KHz and DSD256  
      Dimensions: 30x25x4,5cm Weight: 3 Kgs AC: 110-230V Photos:
       
       




    • By TP1
      I have played around with computer audio for a few years now and like many others, spent $$$  trying to perfect it. However I was always drawn back to the Accuphase DP-950 SACD spinner as a superior source .  Recently I did some digging  to see what was available from  established, full range  high-end audio companies to see if any had produced  a top quality USB server.   I came across the Esoteric N-03T , the only server that fit my criteria.    It was launched in 2018 but for some reason hasn't been promoted ( or even stocked) in Australia so it slipped under  the radar.   
       
      Firstly , it is built from the ground up for the task at hand,  it is not pc or NAS based.
       

       
       
      To quote Esoteric  " The dedicated power supply for the network module also has an EDLC (Electric Double-layer Capacitor), a super-capacitor that has 1F (1,000,000μF) capacitance." 
      I understand the  N03-T  is   a DAC-less version of the Esoteric N0-1.    It can either be used as a streaming server  or you can source the music from an attached SSD.   It is Roon Ready, and has built in support for Tidal, Spotify etc and internet radio.
       

       
       

       
       
      How does it sound?   Amazing!  I was encouraged by rave reviews translated from Japanese and upon first hearing it I understood the excitement.   It has the lowest noise floor, better timing , pace, depth and imaging ofany other server I have come across.   Overall the sound is as natural and  with great depth. It hits the eating edge of notes extremely well - the PC based servers I am familiar with could sound amazing, but this is on another level altogether.
       
      I only used an attached SSD for music source,  and I haven't had a chance yo setup network audio yet.    I think the local Esoteric Distributors could sell a lot of these if only they knew what it was capable of. 
       
       
    • By mtan002
      Item Condition: Used Shipping Options: Shipping is included in price. Suburb or Town: Point Cook State: Victoria Payment Method: Paypal, EFT Reason for selling: Redundant Further information:
      I bought this kit 2 months ago. It consists of:
       
      Intel NUC5CPYH NUC barebone Kit Kingston 4GB (1x 4GB) DDR3 1600MHz and  Kingston  A400 240GB 2.5" SATA III SSD  
      All you need is an operating system, a monitor and a player to make it a music server in conjunction with your USB/optical DAC and your speakers. 
      Due to its small footprint it is ideal for bedroom or study  room.
       
      Please refer to manufacturer site for product details.  
       
      Photos:
       
      PLEASE READ
      If you are advertising multiple items, you must post one bulk price only, or post seperate ads for each item If you include any reference to pricing whatsoever in this section (excluding RRP), your ad will not be approved If you don't include photographs of the actual item being sold, your ad will not be approved

    • By natecochrane
      Item Condition: Very Good Condition Shipping Options: Pickup available but audition is not available. Suburb or Town: Brisbane State: Queensland Payment Method: Cash on pickup Reason for selling: No longer required  
      SERVER RACK FOR HOME THEATRE 

      This 42RU 600mm (w) x 600mm (d) server rack has held my home theatre (I coudn't find any consumer cabinets that could support my equipment including massive monoblocks and pre-pros).

      It is in VGC except for dust. Has been in storage for past 2 years and now selling to make space.

      Similar to this ~$1200 4Cabling model (slightly updated aesthetics in the newer model) – https://www.4cabling.com.au/42ru-600mm-wide-x-600mm-deep-server-rack.html

      The high-quality freestanding server rack is supplied fully assembled with solid top and base, removable side panels, lockable tempered glass front door and solid steel side & back doors all lockable for added security. The new lockable side door design is created to get maximum flexibility with minimum footprint without sacrificing security.

      Applications other than home theatre include server room, DVR, security equipment, routers, patch panels, switches and rackmount equipment, telephone and PABX equipment, network and communications equipment; UPS equipment; professional audio equipment; and other 19” rack-mountable equipment applications.

      Cable access is through roof or base by removable gland plates. 4Cabling server racks such as this one are built around universal 19" standards, to deliver compatibility with leading vendors and OEM brands. It is very flexible and there are many after-market accessories to help house your equipment. And because it is built on a universal standard, it accepts very many home theatre and Hi-Fi equipment. 

      FEATURES & INCLUSIONS
      Supplied fully assembled Built from high-quality cold-rolled steel Rails, frame and doors, panels, shelves and cable management 2-way ceiling mount fan kit 6-way rack mount power rail Cage nuts 3 x fixed shelves 1 x *bonus* cantilever shelf (shown upright and not fixed in photos) Lockable tempered glass front door, solid lockable steel side and back doors Adjustable 19" L rails front and rear of server rack Levelling feet and lockable castor wheels Cable entry glands on the top and bottom Earthed doors and side panels
      This is a very heavy item (~100KG) so you must arrange for suitable transport when you pick it up.
       
      NB this is a very tall rack ~2m.
       

      Front
       

      Front (open)
       

      Left side rear
       

      Left side front
       

      Ceiling fan
       

      Cantilever shelf (not fixed, on its side for display)
       

      6x PDU
       

      6x PDU (close-up)
       

      Lockable Front, sides, rear
       

      Side (panel removed for access)
       

      Heavy-duty castors and screw feet
       

      Front door handle and lock
       

      Front door handle and lock (open)
    • By D’accordo
      Item: Aurender N10 Music server 8TB in Black colour 
      Location: Melbourne 
      Price: 9450 AUD( RRP12,999 for 8TB) including shipping to any stages in Australia  
      Item Condition: 99% as new, opened box for photos taking and testing, less than 20 hours running  
      Reason for selling: Funding for house Renovation 
      Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only
      Extra Info: Regretful sale due to some urgent issues. I had purchased from Addited to audio in Kew, Melbourne 3 weeks ago as per reciept photo. I haven't have time to tried it out much. This is one of the best Music server in the market I would said. As you can see, Aurender has been used to play with millions dolars systems in almost every hifi shows in the word. the unit solid and sleek looking. It can streaming Tidal, roon via Airplay using the aurender Conductor app.
       
      Feature and Specifications: 
      Ultra High-Quality SPDIF and AES/EBU Digital Audio Outputs
      N10’s AES/EBU, BNC, Coaxial, and Optical outputs provide a superior musical presentation. As opposed to an asynchonous USB connection, where the DAC pulls packets of information from the player, N10’s SPDIF and AES/EBU audio outputs push signal out to the DAC at intervals defined by the on-board OCXO clock. With a clock this precise, trust us, you want to use it!.
       
      Oven-Controlled Crystal Oscillator (OCXO) for Long-Term Jitter Reduction: OCXOs are among the most accurate and stable clocks in use today, and are orders of magnitude more accurate and stable than commonly used ordinary crystal oscillators usually found in computers. Temperature changes cause crystal oscillations to fluctuate, which can lead to jitter in the digital audio signal. Moreover, ordinary crystals are much less stable and lose accuracy over time. In OCXO clocks, a very stable, high-grade crystal oscillator is enclosed in a compartment and kept at a constant temperature to prevent jitter from temperature fluctuations.
      Precision DSD-to-PCM Conversion by FPGA
      Many DACs support DSD decoding only on their USB inputs and not on SPDIF or AES/EBU. That’s why the Aurender N10 (and W20) feature an extremely high-quality DSD-to-PCM conversion by FPGA.
      FPGA-Based All Digital Phase-Locked Loop System
      An All Digital Phase-Locked Loop system (ADPLL) incorporating Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) with OCXO clocks precisely times digital audio data transmissions and minimizes jitter to below negligible levels.
       
      8TB Hard Disk Drive Storage with Solid-State Drive Cache for Playback
      Internal hard drives provide either 4TB or 8TB of storage and a 240G solid-state drive is used to cache music for playback. If a selected song or album is already cached to the solid-state drive, the hard drive will remain asleep. This minimizes wear and tear on the hard drive. By caching songs to the solid-state drive for playback, electrical and acoustic noise resulting from spinning disks, moving heads and motors are completely eliminated.
       
      Dedicated USB Audio Class 2.0 Output with Ultra Low Noise Power Circuitry
      The dedicated USB Audio Class 2.0 output is designed to deliver an exceptionally transparent audio signal free of noise, and is shielded from outside electronic interference.
       
      USB HDD and NAS (Network-Attached Storage) Support
      Best performance occurs when music is stored on the Aurender’s internal storage. However, the Aurender platform is also capable of seamlessly integrating content stored on a NAS or external USB hard drive.
       
      Aurender Conductor App Packed with Convenient Features for Full-Function Control
      The Aurender Conductor App turns the iPad into a versatile user interface for Aurender music servers. All settings and functions of the Aurender server can be easily accessed through the Settings menu, and the app comes with extensive features to make browsing and playing high resolution music collections a breeze.
       
      MQA Core Decoder (optional in-app purchase)
      Aurender’s optional MQA Core Decoder upgrade enables “first-level” MQA unfolding to play MQA files at up to 48 or 96 kHz.
       
       
      N10 SPECIFICATIONS
      Compatible Formats DSD(DSF, DFF), WAV, FLAC, AIFF, ALAC, M4A, APE and others Bit and Sample Rates SPDIF: Up to 24-bit, 192kHz (PCM); 1-bit, 2.8MHz (DSD64)
      USB: 32bit / 384kHz, 1-bit, 2.8MHz (DSD64); 1-bit, 5.6MHz (DSD128)
      User Software Aurender Conductor iPad App, Android App (Lite Version) Solid-State Drive 1 x 240 GB Hard Disk Drives 4TB / 8TB SPDIF Clocking FPGA-based All Digital Phase Locked Loop Audio Clock OCXO Digital Audio Outputs 1 coaxial, 1 optical, 1 AES/EBU, 1 BNC (Impedance 75Ω), 1 USB Audio Class 2.0 Digital I/O 1 Gigabit LAN, 2 x USB 2.0 CPU Board Proprietary Aurender Board Main Memory 4GB Finish Silver or Black Dimensions 430mm x 83mm x 353mm
      16.93in x 3.27in x 13.9in Weight 12.26kg
      27.03 lb Power Consumption Play (27W), Peak (37W), Standby (3.1W) further reviews:  Aurender N10 Music Server Review | AudioStream
      WWW.AUDIOSTREAM.COM Noise. Sometimes it’s hard to hear what’s really going on because there’s so much of it in our lives these days obscuring what we’re really trying to listen to. I mean, do you have any idea how much...  
                     
       
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