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catman

'Non Audiophile' records that sound particularly pleasant.

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They sound good yes, but more like CD sound, not vinyl :(, so overall, not as satisfying as a true analogue on vinyl. Keep your originals and don't bother with the 'new' pressings..... :thumb:

 

I'd argue that when those albums were released they would use analog phasing / flangers and reverb. Digital effects weren't around much in the 70's

 

 

 

I bought the CD remasters a few years ago and they did a good job with them, but I still prefer the original pressings which I own in good condition.

Your are listening to a digital analog hybrid. But since its from a 96khz master it should be preferable to the CD at 44.1khz. do they sound good? I was tempted to buy them, but since my original copies are perfectly fine I didnt.

They sound good yes, but more like CD sound, not vinyl :(, so overall, not as satisfying as a true analogue on vinyl. Keep your originals and don't bother with the 'new' pressings..... :thumb:

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They sound good yes, but more like CD sound, not vinyl :(, so overall, not as satisfying as a true analogue on vinyl. Keep your originals and don't bother with the 'new' pressings..... :thumb:

 

I'd argue that when those albums were released they would use analog phasing / flangers and reverb. Digital effects weren't around much in the 70's

 

 

 

I bought the CD remasters a few years ago and they did a good job with them, but I still prefer the original pressings which I own in good condition.

Your are listening to a digital analog hybrid. But since its from a 96khz master it should be preferable to the CD at 44.1khz. do they sound good? I was tempted to buy them, but since my original copies are perfectly fine I didnt.

They sound good yes, but more like CD sound, not vinyl :(, so overall, not as satisfying as a true analogue on vinyl. Keep your originals and don't bother with the 'new' pressings..... :thumb:

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They sound good yes, but more like CD sound, not vinyl :(, so overall, not as satisfying as a true analogue on vinyl. Keep your originals and don't bother with the 'new' pressings..... :thumb:

 

I'd argue that when those albums were released they would use analog phasing / flangers and reverb. Digital effects weren't around much in the 70's

 

 

 

I bought the CD remasters a few years ago and they did a good job with them, but I still prefer the original pressings which I own in good condition.

Your are listening to a digital analog hybrid. But since its from a 96khz master it should be preferable to the CD at 44.1khz. do they sound good? I was tempted to buy them, but since my original copies are perfectly fine I didnt.

They sound good yes, but more like CD sound, not vinyl :(, so overall, not as satisfying as a true analogue on vinyl. Keep your originals and don't bother with the 'new' pressings..... :thumb:

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I'd argue that when those albums were released they would use analog phasing / flangers and reverb. Digital effects weren't around much in the 70's

 

 

 

I bought the CD remasters a few years ago and they did a good job with them, but I still prefer the original pressings which I own in good condition.

Your are listening to a digital analog hybrid. But since its from a 96khz master it should be preferable to the CD at 44.1khz. do they sound good? I was tempted to buy them, but since my original copies are perfectly fine I didnt.

They sound quite good yes, but more like CD sound, not vinyl :(, so overall, not as satisfying as a true analogue on vinyl. Keep your originals and don't bother with the 'new' pressings..... :thumb:

Edited by stevoz

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Geez I hate my broadband sometimes....... :emot-bang:

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I'd argue that when those albums were released they would use analog phasing / flangers and reverb. Digital effects weren't around much in the 70's

 

Pleasure Principle and Telekon were released in 1979 and 1980 respectively. The use of digital effects in the recording process, while not completely mainstream, were certainly well established by then:

 

 

Numan employed a lot of digital effects on the Pleasure Principle:

 

Numan completely abandoned guitars on the album. This change, coupled with frequent use of synthetic percussion, produced the most purely electronic and robotic sound of his career. In addition to the Minimoog synthesizer employed on his previous album, Numan made liberal use of the Polymoog keyboard, particularly its distinctive "Vox Humana" preset. Other production tricks included copious amounts of flangingphasing and reverb, plus the unusual move of including solo viola and violin parts in the arrangements. Numan was also influenced by Kraftwerk; the track "Cars" had the same musical "glides" as "Autobahn" and both songs used the same synthesizers. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pleasure_Principle_(Gary_Numan_album)).

 

"Phasing" is produced by an electronic sound processor called a phaser. It filters the signal by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum. The position of the peaks and troughs of the waveform being affected is typically modulated so that they vary over time, creating a sweeping effect.(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaser_(effect))

 

So you can argue all you want.... but you'd only look foolish in doing so.

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Fascinating stuff, NN! :thumb:  I guess 'Replicas' by Tubeway Army/Gary Numan, which I have the original vinyl of, would have had the same level of digital input as the following two albums, and I must say that it sounds so much better than the two new LP's......interesting :) . I think I may stick more to buying quality old stock, even though I do have some excellent sounding new LP's. New releases of old music could be a bit of a lottery. :unsure:  

Edited by stevoz

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Pleasure Principle and Telekon were released in 1979 and 1980 respectively. The use of digital effects in the recording process, while not completely mainstream, were certainly well established by then:

 

 

Numan employed a lot of digital effects on the Pleasure Principle:

 

Numan completely abandoned guitars on the album. This change, coupled with frequent use of synthetic percussion, produced the most purely electronic and robotic sound of his career. In addition to the Minimoog synthesizer employed on his previous album, Numan made liberal use of the Polymoog keyboard, particularly its distinctive "Vox Humana" preset. Other production tricks included copious amounts of flangingphasing and reverb, plus the unusual move of including solo viola and violin parts in the arrangements. Numan was also influenced by Kraftwerk; the track "Cars" had the same musical "glides" as "Autobahn" and both songs used the same synthesizers. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pleasure_Principle_(Gary_Numan_album)).

 

"Phasing" is produced by an electronic sound processor called a phaser. It filters the signal by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum. The position of the peaks and troughs of the waveform being affected is typically modulated so that they vary over time, creating a sweeping effect.(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaser_(effect))

 

So you can argue all you want.... but you'd only look foolish in doing so.

 

No I wouldn't be foolish. Do you come here to put people down? why the personal insult? (if you are not sure what I mean I'm referring to your insinuation that I am foolish)

 

Do you have some OCD where you must be right and nobody else is allowed to express an opinion contrary to your own?

 

The only reference to Gary Numan and effects you mention above refers to a phlanger. A 1970's phlanger uses a bucket brigade delay line. Some say this is digital because it uses a clock to switch the capacitor network, but the signal running through the capacitors is an analog signal.

 

Of the thousands of albums released in the 1970's the majority used no digital. A 1970's synthesizer is not digital, though later 1980's ones are.

I wouldn't have the time in my life to cite every 1970's album recorded using an all analog process and they would vastly outnumber the albums that used digital effects. I've done a lot of reaserch into digital recording. The information you presented above was not news to me. Its not proof that digital equipment was prolific or mainstream in the  majority of the 1970's. My comment was "Digital effects weren't around much in the 70's" and I stand by that.

Edited by eltech

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No I wouldn't be foolish. Do you come here to put people down? why the personal insult? (if you are not sure what I mean I'm referring to your insinuation that I am foolish)

 

Do you have some OCD where you must be right and nobody else is allowed to express an opinion contrary to your own?

 

I never called you foolish? Clearly reading comprehension isn't one of your strengths (not that I'm saying you don't have any).

 

You are the one who is being obstinate regarding this topic.

 

Might I remind you that it was YOU who challenged me on what I posted? I merely provided evidence and rational that backed up my assertion.

 

I never claimed that digital effects were in widespread use in the 70's? I was only acknowledging the reality that Numan used digital effects on the two albums under discussion.

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I never called you foolish? Clearly reading comprehension isn't one of your strengths (not that I'm saying you don't have any).

 

You are the one who is being obstinate regarding this topic.

 

Might I remind you that it was YOU who challenged me on what I posted? I merely provided evidence and rational that backed up my assertion.

 

I never claimed that digital effects were in widespread use in the 70's? I was only acknowledging the reality that Numan used digital effects on the two albums under discussion.

 

You are the one who ended your post by saying "So you can argue all you want.... but you'd only look foolish in doing so."

 

Effectively that is saying you will have no further discussion on the matter and he who dares to challenge you.... is foolish.

 

That is a pretty rude way to have a discussion. Would you say that to someone in person?

 

Yes I challenged you because you are wrong. A bucket brigade is an analog device which passes analog audio signals. I found this document just then showing how to build a phlanger using an analog delay. http://hammer.ampage.org/files/PAiA_Phlanger.PDF

 

 

I never said digital effects were not used in the 70's. I simply said they weren't widespread. I cannot see by your post any evidence of Gary Numan using digital effects.

 

A digital effect would have to use an AD converter, and a DA converter.  70's effects simply didn't use them because they were far too expensive.

 

A digital phalanger would need to have an AD conveter, a DA converter, RAM and DSP to achieve the phlanging effect. Even a AD conversion stored in RAM then clocked out to an AD converter would have been so expensive compared to a bucket brigade analog phlanger that your assertion is that a digital phlanger was used is unbelievable and unsubstantiated. Frankly why would anyone use a multi thousand dollar digital phlanger (if it even existed in 78/79) when they can use a cheap and good sounding analog version?

 

Analog phlangers are still made

http://www.sweetwater.com/c975--Flangers

 

not all on that page are analog, but quite a few are, The ones that are say analog in the description

 

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Clusterflux

 

"Vintage analog warmth

The Moog Music Cluster Flux gives you vintage-flavored chorus, flange, and vibrato that are quite different-sounding from the effects produced by other chorus type devices you may have tried. Beyond that, you can coax otherworldly sounds out of the Cluster Flux that are pure vintage Moog. The secret is in the chips that drive the Cluster Flux. Rare vintage analog Bucket Brigade Device chips serve up rich, warm-sounding effects that place the Cluster Flux in a class of its own.

Edited by eltech

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eltech, since you appear to fond of quotes (judging by your signature), I'll leave you with one:

 

"I have no time for this analogue vs. digital argument that seems to be going on forever. I simply don’t care."

(Gary Numan; Electronic Beats magazine; Winter 2013/14 issue; http://www.electronicbeats.net/buy-me-a-car-%E2%80%A8and-ill-sign-%E2%80%A8anything-gary-numan-interviewed/)

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Give it a rest you boring tossers and get back to the subject title.

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Hergest is right.....Eltech and NordicNorm, I'm afraid that at the moment, you both look a bit foolish......... :). The bottom line is that it appears early vinyl versions of Gary Numan's music sound better than new releases of the same, because they are an analogue presentation of a digitally influenced source, as opposed to a digital/analogue 'hybrid' presentation, as the new releases appear to be. As for the Gary Numan quote, that's fine for him to say, because his aim as an artist, is to get recognition (and income!) for his output, whatever the format, but I DO care, because as a listener, I CAN hear the difference.....and that's the bottom line. :thumb:

Edited by stevoz

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Deleted repeat post due to f***ing Broadband issues....

Edited by stevoz

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Here's a couple that are in heavy rotation here. 

 

Pat Travers-Makin' Magic

 

51RUCfV4%2BmL.jpg

 

1977 hard rock lp. Fantastic recording with kick in the guts drum sound, minimal overdubs, superb bass lines from Mars Cowling and Pat's top class guitar playing.

 

JJ Cale- Shades

 

JJ_Cale_Shades_cover.jpg

 

Wonderfully layered instruments so you can place every musician. Great musicianship and tunes aplenty.

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Recently bought a German pressing of Sting's 'Nothing Like the Sun' double LP. Superbly refined and dynamic recording and a great pressing!! :thumb: Also the 'Blue' vinyl Oz pressing of his first solo album, 'Dream of the Blue Turtles' is a beauty. :)

Edited by stevoz

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Anything from GRP records [emoji3][emoji1303]

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Recently bought a German pressing of Sting's 'Nothing Like the Sun' double LP. Superbly refined and dynamic recording and a great pressing!! :thumb: Also the 'Blue' vinyl Oz pressing of his first solo album, 'Dream of the Blue Turtles' is a beauty. :)

 

 

Nothing Like The Sun is a stunning recording. One of my go to albums.

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Nothing Like The Sun is a stunning recording. One of my go to albums.

Agree, it's certainly one of my 'go to' LP's now! :thumb:

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Anything from GRP records [emoji3][emoji1303]

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

If you're into Jazz that is :unsure: .....do they do jazz/rock fusion? :)

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If you're into Jazz that is :unsure: .....do they do jazz/rock fusion? :)

Jazz Rock fusion that's what I listen to

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Jazz Rock fusion that's what I listen to

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    I shall check them out further.... :thumb:

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I must mention a recent purchase that deserves sonic kudo's, and that is "Brother Where You Bound" by Supertramp, their first release after the departure of Roger Hogdson. I have the Oz pressing, and I must say, if there's a better UK or German pressing out there, I want to hear it! It's outstanding! Brilliant production/recording, everything is in it's rightful place. On the subject of what is the better album in what was a "fork in the road" moment for this band, this album or Roger Hogdson's "Eye of the Storm", I have always dismissed "Brother" to an extent as a true Supertramp album after hearing "In the Eye of the Storm" when it came out and concluding, 'this is the new 'Supertramp' album', even though I loved the 'Tramps 'Cannonball'. On finally hearing "Brother Where You Bound" in full, I have changed this view. I prefer "Brother" over "Eye of the Storm", it is pure Supertramp and a wonderful album in it's own right, as well as being a better sonic production than "Eye". I think I prefer Rick Davies darker approach than Hogdson's more 'jolly' attitude, with his attempts at the sombre not matching Davies powerful impact. A fantastic album! :thumb:

Edited by stevoz

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I was pleasantly surprised at the quality of Back to Black by Amy Winehouse. The mastering is so much better than the CD which is almost unlistenable in my opinion.  Bass as bloated as the Michelin Man and treble that attacks the ears like shards of ice. The LP version tones these two elements down and makes it a fantastic listen.

Amy_Winehouse_-_Back_to_Black_%28album%2

 

Also got this on a whim the other day because I liked the cover and it turned out to be a well pressed record in the Back to Black series. 

808f10e6.jpg

Edited by Richardtheaudio

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