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Just now, jakeyb77 said:

I’ve used the stone in the Weber Q for pizza also. Found it takes a bloody long time to get the stone up to temp but works pretty good. 

whack on high ? how long jakey ? what temp aiming for ? 

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Fresh Barramundi, Valencia Orange, my back yard coriander, extra virgin olive oil.   Cooked on the Weber with the fish never touching the hotplate - instead atop the oranges with the bbq lid

The Rig - Primo Oval XL The results

A short break from all that delicious food to announce my BBQ kitchen is 99% complete. Did some rearranging since the cook last Thursday and ordered a new workbench with shelves to house all my spices

2 hours ago, betty boop said:

whack on high ? how long jakey ? what temp aiming for ? 

Yeah whack the stone in on high while getting pizza and topping organised.

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Here's the dough I use most. This is for one pizza.

 

125 gm flour (must be high protein: 11% or better. I use 12.2% bread flour. Note—"00" flour is a very fine grind and despite the label of "pizza" it may only be suitable for pastry unless high protein. Low protein flour won't hold the bubbles.)

bare ¼ teaspoon instant yeast (must be fresh)

¼ teaspoon sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

Mix thoroughly

 

75 gm warm water

Add and stir/mix until flour is absorbed

Cover with plastic wrap and let sit for 10-15 minutes

 

½-1 teaspoon olive oil

Add to dough and knead for 3 minutes

Cover and let sit at room temperature for a couple of hours to rise. (It's even better if after it starts to rise you store in the fridge for one to two days. Remove from fridge and let sit at room temperature, still covered, until it warms and starts to rise again—at least one hour, up to two)

 

Spread to pizza size, moving dough only by pressing and spreading with fingertips—no rolling pin. (If you can toss it like a pro then do that. I can't.🙁) A bit of flour/semolina on the board or olive oil on the pan will stop it sticking.

 

Add toppings and bake. Best on a stone or heavy metal sheet pre-heated in a REALLY hot oven but a normal pizza dish will do.

Edited by GregWormald
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Wow been on this site for a while and didn't know this thread existed. Better info here than half the BBQ threads. Have a few camp ovens a gasser and Kamado all built into an out door kitchen. Seems two of my passions are covered on one site. How good is that. The kamados are great for pizzas. You never stop learning. 

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On 03/07/2020 at 1:19 PM, Tubularbells said:

But jokes aside thats some lovely slabs of beef right there. Never heard of a Brahman hump before though.

 

This is my third Hump and from different cow's, some would call me easy. 

 

The first two had heaps of fine marbling all the way through, like this and performed just like brisket

https://www.bbqaroma.com.au/beef-hump-cupim.ir

 

They were out of stock of that particular variety so I got a leaner cut with quite a big fat vain through the center, thought I was doing the right thing cutting most of it out. If I had my time again I'd leave it in and remove it at carve up time, came out a little drier than I'd like however was quickly devoured. 

Smoked the ribs and Hump together combination of mesquite and American Oak 7 hours at 225 and temp of ribs was 150 Hump was a bit less and I could tell it was dry. Wrapped the ribs nude but sauced up the Hump to try and get some moisture happening. 

Had a direct BBQ going for chicken, corn and some freaky vegan patties, I could tell my smoker was nervous at the sight of them. 

 

New Workshop BBQ pit ......... through the Getto's and the Bowery's and the Slum

 

IMG_0785.thumb.PNG.1370bcb9a429fc91be834d745c430d0d.PNG

 

I had a few mouths to feed so removed the rib bones and chopped up, served with a Memphis wet slaw and BBQ sauce, a stock fav at out house.

Hump to the right, can be sliced thin across the grain like brisket and is great the next day on sandwiches. Hindsight is easy but at the wrap mark I should have cubed and made it into burn ends, the bark was stellar. 

Bunged some fat sausages on at the death, easy and yummy.

 

IMG_0786.thumb.PNG.59a237a253f7f4e017f5a85750330cdd.PNG

 

Darts, Table Tennis and Music also on the menu, Soical distancing to NSW standard observed at all times 🤒

 

IMG_0788.thumb.PNG.014e700b3ce6e47fbef227d30c721198.PNG

 

IMG_0787.thumb.PNG.a7ce18e903a51b90aec42093b72d9b35.PNG

 

Warriors beating the Bronco's in the background, what a let down the whole comp has been 

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Nah, my joinery workshop, we let the ladies in. I project manage (hands on) the building of cafes, bars and restaurants and we do the bespoke joinery pieces here. With the Covid down turn in hospitality I've had to take on a bit of boring residential work and a few speaker projects which I find rewarding. I think you will like these knowing what you have had in the church.

 

https://www.stereo.net.au/forums/topic/311905-altec-lansing-846b-valencia/

 

 

Edited by Powerglide
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39 minutes ago, mtf said:

First go at smoking a chook, Fingers crossed🤞

 

You’ll never get anywhere with those cables. Time to upgrade.

😆

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1 minute ago, Steffen said:

You’ll never get anywhere with those cables. Time to upgrade.

😆

Was thinking about some Nordost, will they give a more accurate reading or is it all about speed?

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2 hours ago, mtf said:

First go at smoking a chook, Fingers crossed🤞

BE6D90FF-7E0A-4086-AC56-4BB06DE5DD15.jpeg

Very noice....how was it?

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4 minutes ago, Mendes said:

Very noice....how was it?

Still waiting, nearly there👍

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Wow!! It worked out fantastic, 4.5 hrs on smoke and a quick sear on the WeberQ, Phew!! Happy days👍

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On 05/07/2020 at 1:53 PM, Powerglide said:

 

This is my third Hump and from different cow's, some would call me easy. 

 

The first two had heaps of fine marbling all the way through, like this and performed just like brisket

https://www.bbqaroma.com.au/beef-hump-cupim.ir

 

They were out of stock of that particular variety so I got a leaner cut with quite a big fat vain through the center, thought I was doing the right thing cutting most of it out. If I had my time again I'd leave it in and remove it at carve up time, came out a little drier than I'd like however was quickly devoured. 

Smoked the ribs and Hump together combination of mesquite and American Oak 7 hours at 225 and temp of ribs was 150 Hump was a bit less and I could tell it was dry. Wrapped the ribs nude but sauced up the Hump to try and get some moisture happening. 

Had a direct BBQ going for chicken, corn and some freaky vegan patties, I could tell my smoker was nervous at the sight of them. 

 

New Workshop BBQ pit ......... through the Getto's and the Bowery's and the Slum

 

IMG_0785.thumb.PNG.1370bcb9a429fc91be834d745c430d0d.PNG

 

I had a few mouths to feed so removed the rib bones and chopped up, served with a Memphis wet slaw and BBQ sauce, a stock fav at out house.

Hump to the right, can be sliced thin across the grain like brisket and is great the next day on sandwiches. Hindsight is easy but at the wrap mark I should have cubed and made it into burn ends, the bark was stellar. 

Bunged some fat sausages on at the death, easy and yummy.

 

IMG_0786.thumb.PNG.59a237a253f7f4e017f5a85750330cdd.PNG

 

Darts, Table Tennis and Music also on the menu, Soical distancing to NSW standard observed at all times 🤒

 

IMG_0788.thumb.PNG.014e700b3ce6e47fbef227d30c721198.PNG

 

IMG_0787.thumb.PNG.a7ce18e903a51b90aec42093b72d9b35.PNG

 

Warriors beating the Bronco's in the background, what a let down the whole comp has been 

...a splendid time is guaranteed for all...

 

Cheers,

 

Alberto

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Guest jakeyb77
On 03/07/2020 at 5:22 PM, jakeyb77 said:

 The whole state will close within days will be my prediction. 
 

Don’t say I didn’t warn you 😉

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1 hour ago, jakeyb77 said:

Don’t say I didn’t warn you 😉

Looks like they are going with my suggestion... and possibly further relaxing in regional areas soon. Still not many active cases in eastern suburbs or regional areas. But yes time to bunker down and get ready for homeschooling again :no::emot-bang:

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Guest jakeyb77
1 hour ago, blybo said:

Looks like they are going with my suggestion... and possibly further relaxing in regional areas soon. Still not many active cases in eastern suburbs or regional areas. But yes time to bunker down and get ready for homeschooling again :no::emot-bang:

Just make sure you have plenty of fuel for the BBQ 😁

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4 hours ago, jakeyb77 said:

Just make sure you have plenty of fuel for the BBQ 😁

Speaking of which: anyone got a good source for firewood this winter, free or paid?

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11 hours ago, candyflip said:

Speaking of which: anyone got a good source for firewood this winter, free or paid?

We just got the final load of Cypress pine from the inlaws farm. When that runs out we'll need a good source too, although ours is only for the Chiminea and a portable fire pit I have on backorder. Cypress pine burns really hot but it's messy with lots of ash and not much coals, so no good for cooking on.

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4 hours ago, blybo said:

We just got the final load of Cypress pine from the inlaws farm. When that runs out we'll need a good source too, although ours is only for the Chiminea and a portable fire pit I have on backorder. Cypress pine burns really hot but it's messy with lots of ash and not much coals, so no good for cooking on.

I'm not cooking - I'm warming the house.

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My in-laws farm house is heated by wood heater. They won’t use the Cypress as too much ash escapes into the house

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I'm not sure you can get behind the NYT paywall so I'll c+p the entire article and the recipe.

It's a good read.

 

6 Steps to the Best Barbecued Ribs

A backyard grill can easily produce the spicy, smoky slabs that for many are barbecue’s ultimate prizeRibs — which take a few hours to cook and just 30 minutes of prep work — are eminently worth the effort.

 

Let Texans brag about brisket and Carolinians extol pulled pork shoulder. For the rest of us, the ultimate emblem of barbecue — and test of a grill master’s mettle — is ribs.

Picture meaty slabs stung with spice, bronzed with smoke and slathered with sticky sweet barbecue sauce. The meat is tender, but not too tender, with a profound pork flavor enhanced by the pit master’s art.

You may have thought such alchemy possible only at the best barbecue joints. But great ribs are surprisingly easy to make at home, which is good news at a time when eating out can be fraught.

Ribs are barbecue at its most primal and unadorned; indeed, that’s the crux of their appeal. It’s conceivable that you might eat brisket with a knife and fork, or more likely between two slices of white bread. Pork shoulder comes either shredded or chopped, and you always eat it on a bun.

 
 

Ribs, on the other hand, demand to be devoured caveman-style, ripped apart with bare hands and gnawed right off the bone.

I won’t say that cooking them is quick — if you want speed, grill a steak. But if ribs take two to three hours in all, the actual prep can be done in 30 minutes. True, the process as I’ve laid it out here requires a homemade spice rub and barbecue sauce, and turning your grill into a smoker. But the results are achievable by all, and eminently worth the effort.

Just follow these six steps, and the recipe I’ve provided. No special equipment is needed beyond the grill you probably already have in your backyard.

1. Choose the right ribs

Baby backs have the most generous marbling and the tenderest meat.

Baby backs have the most generous marbling and the tenderest meat.

 

 

The pig supplies four types of ribs: baby backs (sometimes called top loin ribs), spareribs, rib tips and country-style ribs. You want to use the baby backs, which are cut from high on the hog (quite literally, as they abut the backbone). Baby backs have the most generous marbling and the tenderest meat, which makes them relatively quick to cook — and a natural for newcomers. When possible, buy ribs from a heritage pork breed, like Berkshire (sometimes called Kurobuta) or Mangalitsa. They cost more, but their intense porky flavor justifies the price.

 
 

2. Layer the flavors.

A dry rub, a barbecue sauce and an initial layer of mustard help to layer flavor onto the ribs.

A dry rub, a barbecue sauce and an initial layer of mustard help to layer flavor onto the ribs.

 

 

One of the secrets of great ribs — indeed, great barbecue in general — is a process that creates layers of flavors. I start with a slather, like Dijon mustard, that I brush on both sides of each rack of ribs. Next, I apply a rub — in the recipe here, a fragrant amalgam of chile powder, brown sugar, salt and pepper, with celery seed added for spice. The third layer comes from apple cider, which you spritz on halfway through cooking. (This also helps keep the ribs moist.) The fourth layer — the varnish, as it were — takes the form of a chipotle bourbon barbecue sauce, which you sear into the meat over a hot fire, creating a glossy finish. The crowning touch is a light, fresh sprinkle of rub added right before serving the ribs to bring attention back to the spice.

3. Grill over indirect heat.

Indirect heat keeps the ribs from overcooking.

 

 

Most professional pit masters cook ribs low and slow in a smoker. You’re going to going use a hotter and faster method called indirect grilling. In short, you cook the ribs next to, not directly over, the fire, with the grill lid closed and hardwood added to produce wood smoke.

To set up a charcoal grill for indirect grilling, light the coals, then pour or rake them into two mounds at opposite sides of the grill. Place a foil pan in the center to catch the dripping rib fat. The ribs go onto the grate over this drip pan, away from the heat.

To set up a two-burner gas grill for indirect grilling, light one side and cook the ribs on the unlit side. On a three-burner gas grill, light the outside or front and rear burners, and cook the ribs over the unlit burner in the center. On a four- to six-burner gas grill, light the outside burners and, again, cook the ribs in the center.

On a kamado-style grill, insert the heat diffuser, a ceramic plate that separates the food from the fire. Pellet grills, by their very design, grill indirectly, so no special setup is needed. Note that with all these types of grills, the lid must be closed.

If cooking four or more racks of ribs, you may want to invest in a rib rack, which holds the slabs vertically, allowing you to fit four racks of ribs in the space two slabs would take lying flat.

4. Apply the smoke.

Smoke imparts the flavor that many American barbecue fans crave.

Smoke imparts the flavor that many American barbecue fans crave.

 

 

Wood smoke has been called the umami of barbecue. It is certainly barbecue’s soul. While you can make delectable baby back ribs without wood smoke, as the French and Brazilians do, they won’t taste like American barbecue. So which wood to use? Debate rages in barbecue circles over the superiority of apple versus cherry, hickory versus mesquite, or whether to employ a combination of several woods. Mesquite lends the strongest flavor, but any hardwood chunk or chip will deliver the requisite smokiness. I smoked the ribs in my recipe with cherry wood, simply because I had it on hand.

To smoke ribs on a charcoal grill, add hardwood chunks or soaked, drained hardwood chips to the embers. (Soaking helps slow the rate of combustion, so the chips smolder and smoke before they catch fire.) In a kamado, intersperse the chunks or chips with the charcoal. A pellet grill has the wood, and smoke, built into the pellets. (Note: On a pellet grill you get more smoke flavor at lower temperatures, so lengthen the cooking time accordingly.)

It’s harder, but not impossible, to smoke on a gas grill. If your grill has a smoker box with a dedicated burner, add chunks or chips there. If not, place a few hardwood chunks under the grate, directly over the burners. Or make smoking pouches: Wrap soaked, drained wood chips in heavy-duty foil to form a flat pillow shape. Poke holes at one-inch intervals in the top with the tip of a meat thermometer, to release the smoke. Position the resulting pouches (two for the ribs here) under the grate, directly over the burners. Run the grill on high until you see smoke, then dial the temperature back to 300 degrees.

What about smoking ribs indoors? Desperate times like these call for desperate measures. I know it smacks of heresy, but you can achieve a reasonable approximation of barbecued ribs in the oven. Cook them on a rack in a roasting pan at 300 degrees. To add a smoke flavor, mix one-half teaspoon liquid smoke with four tablespoons melted butter, and brush this mixture on both sides of the ribs a few times during the last hour of cooking.

 
 

5. Sizzle the sauce.

The sauce is seared into the meat in the last few minutes of grilling.

The sauce is seared into the meat in the last few minutes of grilling.

 

 

While barbecue sauce isn’t mandatory, for most Americans, ribs just don’t taste complete without it. This version calls for one of my favorites — a sweet, smoky blend of molasses, brown sugar and ketchup, with bourbon for kick and chipotle chiles to crank up the heat. Here, too, the sauce goes on in layers — first brushed on and roasted into the ribs during the last 20 minutes of cooking, then applied again and seared into the meat over high heat, and finally served with the ribs for spooning or dipping.

A crucial factor is the sizzle, which involves directly grilling the ribs (move them right over the fire or lit burners) for the final four minutes or so — long enough to caramelize the brown sugar and molasses, and sear the sauce into the meat.

Take care to avoid the cardinal sin of applying the sauce too early, when the ribs first go on the grill. That’s what grown-ups did when I was young, and the sugar in the sauce invariably burned long before the meat was cooked. For many years, I thought barbecue was supposed to taste burned.

6. Know when your ribs are done.

When the rib bones are exposed by a quarter- to a half-inch, the ribs are done.

When the rib bones are exposed by a quarter- to a half-inch, the ribs are done.

 

Pork ribs come with their own version of the pop-up thermometer that signals that a turkey is done: The meat shrinks back from the ends of the bones. When you see a quarter- to a half-inch of clean bone at the end of each rib, it is ready. You should be able to pull the individual ribs apart with your fingers. The meat should resist, but just a little.

Many Americans are accustomed to meat that falls off the bones — a style that may have begun with the doleful practice of boiling or steaming ribs before grilling. The notion of soft (dare I say mushy?) ribs took root in our collective culinary consciousness.

Root out that idea now. Yes, ribs should be tender, but they should definitely retain a little chew. That’s why we have teeth.

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Here's the recipe:

 

Chipotle-Bourbon Barbecue Sauce

Steven Raichlen

  • Yield 2 racks (2 to 4 servings)
  • Time 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 hours
Save to Recipe Box
 
Spice-Rubbed Baby Back Ribs With Chipotle-Bourbon Barbecue Sauce

 

The baby back (sometimes called top loin) is the perfect rib for neophytes. Cut from high on the hog — literally, it abuts the backbone — it’s intrinsically tender and generously marbled, which keeps it moist during smoking. Thanks to these attributes, you can cook it at a higher temperature than the low-and-slow heat favored in the American barbecue belt. This shortens the cooking time and lets you cook the ribs on a common charcoal kettle grill. (However, you can certainly smoke these ribs low and slow at 250 degrees, in which case, you’ll need 3 1/2 to 4 hours of cooking time — and a smoker.) The higher heat and shorter cooking time produce ribs with a firmer, meatier consistency. Add a chile-stung spice rub and a sweet, spicy chipotle-bourbon barbecue sauce, and you wind up with textbook barbecued ribs with a distinctive sweet, hot, smoky finish.

42 ratings
 
 
 

Ingredients

For the Ribs:

  • 2 racks baby back ribs (2 to 2 1/2 pounds each)
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

For the Rub:

  • 1 tablespoon chile powder
  • 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon celery seeds

For Grilling:

  • 2 large or 4 small hardwood chunks or 3 cups hardwood chips (if using the latter, soak in water to cover for 30 minutes, then drain)
  • ½ cup apple cider in a spray bottle (optional)

For the Chipotle-Bourbon Barbecue Sauce:

  • 1 ¼ cups ketchup
  • cup Thai sweet chile sauce
  • ¼ cup bourbon
  • 3 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons molasses
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 to 2 canned chipotle chiles en adobo, minced, plus 1 to 2 teaspoons sauce
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest, plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon liquid smoke
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
 
 

Preparation

  1. Place the ribs on a rimmed baking sheet. If the concave side of your ribs still has its papery membrane intact, remove it: Pry it up at the end of the bones using the tip of a meat thermometer or butter knife, then pull it off with a paper towel. Lightly brush the ribs on both sides with the mustard.
  2. Prepare the rub: In a small bowl, combine the chile powder, brown sugar, salt, pepper and celery seeds. Reserve 1 1/2 teaspoons rub for serving, then sprinkle the remaining rub on the ribs, coating both sides.
  3. Set up your charcoal grill for indirect grilling and heat to 300 degrees.
  4. Once the grill comes to temperature, add half the wood chunks or chips to the coals. Arrange the ribs meat (rounded) side up on the grate away from the heat, then cover the grill. Grill the ribs over indirect heat for 1 hour.
  5. After the ribs have grilled for 1 hour, spray on both sides with apple cider (if using), turning the ribs with tongs. Add the remaining wood chunks or chips to the fire and close the grill again.
  6. While the ribs grill, prepare the barbecue sauce: Place all the sauce ingredients, along with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper, in a heavy saucepan and whisk to mix. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, whisking often. Reduce the heat and gently simmer the sauce, uncovered, until thick and richly flavored, 6 to 8 minutes. Correct the seasoning, adding more salt and pepper to taste; set aside. (Makes about 2 cups.)
  7. Continue grilling the ribs over indirect heat, rounded side up, until sizzling, browned, tender, and the meat has shrunk back from the ends of the bones by 1/4 to 1/2 inch. This normally takes 2 to 2 1/2 hours in all, but sometimes you’ll need a full 3 hours. The last 20 minutes, brush the ribs on both sides with some of the barbecue sauce. When ready, the meat should be tender enough so you can pull the individual ribs apart with your fingers.
  8. Brush each rack on both sides with more barbecue sauce. Move each rack directly over the fire and direct grill to sizzle the sauce into the meat, 2 to 4 minutes per side.
  9. Transfer the ribs to a platter for serving. Brush once more with barbecue sauce and sprinkle the ribs with the remaining rub. Serve the remaining sauce in a bowl on the side.
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Interesting method and i'll definitely give the sauce a try but a couple of things made me go hmmmmm.

 

1) Baby backs do not have better marbling imo, yeah they typically got more meat but I find them drier compared to a spare rib however with a spare rib there's a lot more work in the trimming process 

 

2) Love celery seed but not sure if id ever use it on pork. I save this product for beef although its said to help create the smoke ring if presentation's is paramount

 

Also im assuming this is an American recipe so to anyone wanting to try be aware there TBSP is 20ml and not our standard 25ml size and that temp is in F not C

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New York Times, yup it's American temps+measurements.

Could have something to do with their ability to source different breeds that makes them like the different cuts to us.

I just binned a book on correct carving and meat prep because none of the pork breeds are available in Aus unfortunately.

 

Will try this though when I can get some good ribs.  A local here is selling them thar black&white smudgy looking porkers at the markets but the covids killed the markets for awhile.

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I’ll be cooking on this for the first time tonight. Nothing special just chops and snags till I work the thing out 

 

 

ED94BC56-E894-4438-BDA5-C4DBC2FCB970.jpeg

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2 hours ago, blybo said:

I’ll be cooking on this for the first time tonight. Nothing special just chops and snags till I work the thing out 

 

 

ED94BC56-E894-4438-BDA5-C4DBC2FCB970.jpeg

Good stuff man! Fire, grill, meat on top. Beer in your hand. Happy days.

 

Cheers,

 

Alberto

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7 hours ago, Tubularbells said:

Also im assuming this is an American recipe so to anyone wanting to try be aware there TBSP is 20ml and not our standard 25ml size and that temp is in F not C

I doubt it would  make much difference in this recipe but the Aust. std. tablespoon is 20ml and the US about 15ml. Most places use 3 teaspoons to the tablespoon or exactly 15ml.

 

Additionally I'd be careful with the amount of sweetening. EVERYTHING in the US has added sugar and many non-US find it all too sweet.

 

I also recommend stripping off the membrane on the inside of the ribs for better flavour penetration and increased tenderness.

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11 hours ago, GregWormald said:

I also recommend stripping off the membrane on the inside of the ribs for better flavour penetration and increased tenderness.

Yup, first thing I do.

12 hours ago, betocool said:

Good stuff man! Fire, grill, meat on top. Beer in your hand. Happy days.

 

Cheers,

 

Alberto

And it all packs away flat in a canvas bag. Rained over night so I haven't packed it away yet. Meat turned out well but not overly smokey.

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Hey guys, I like some bbq occasionally. I have a chargrill and smoker that I want to use more.

 

I’ve done a couple of briskets but think the one I did recently was the first in the smoker. The other was braised and I may actually prefer that method, as it’s easier to keep it from drying out.

 

The one I smoked turned out very tasty but a bit dry. I rubbed it with brown sugar, herbs and spices and tried to maintain around 120c temp, but that’s something I need to work on. I didn’t have any heat beads or charcoal like I’d normally use for heat but it turned out to be a good thing because the wood I burned imparted a nice smokiness, not too strong for my liking, which is a problem I’ve had in the past, smoking cherry and/or hickory. I did ribs like that and the smokiness was overpowering. The wood used this time was red or spotted gum or similar.

 

I’m getting quite good at making bbq sauce after making a fair few batches. Mmm, gotta remember to smoke some ribs. I keep forgetting because I’m not used to cooking in the middle of the day.

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If you wrap after the stall (once the meat is above 150) you should retain a lot more moisture.

 

I take it your ribs were pork, quite a subtle meat that can't handle stronge smoke like Aussie hardwoods or Mesquite, try the fruit woods or American Oak less robust but still gives a smokey essence and nice ring. 

 

Having some hungery lads over for darts tomorrow night, putting a Boston Butt on in the AM should be good, American Oak smoke with apple cider vinegar/apple juice spritzer. The Oak is super light but spritzing helps the smoke stick to the beast, went for a sugary hot rub hoping for a sticky bark

 

IMG_0832.thumb.PNG.5e2f50b4a39de6431ccc6c7599a685a1.PNG

 

IMG_0833.thumb.PNG.c6dc75aeac7be31459fe946895de9c67.PNG

 

 

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I did wrap in foil for a fair while but can’t remember how long exactly. Dunno if it was after the stall. I had a couple of fluctuations in temp above and below 230f during the 6-7 hour cook. I realised that temp control is the thing to master, because I’ve been cooking most of my life and can cook very good food, if I do say so myself. But this is backed up by those that eat my cooking lol. I’ve never put much time into cooking over solid fuel though and not having a tap to control gas for instance, throws me. 
 

The ribs were probably pork. Might’ve been pork belly actually because I vaguely remember thinking the fattiness and strong smoke flavour was nauseating.
 

How are you supposed to smoke for 12 hours?! Watch it the whole time right? That’s dedication.

 

Do we have a a similar cut to Boston butt mate? It looks like a leg or shoulder of pork.

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One in the same, pork shoulder bone in 

 

temp control is just learning how your particular BBQ holds, most are pretty stable for the first 6-7 hours before you need to start regulating air, unless it's windy PITA. 

 

The easiest way is buy one of those wiz bang thermo fans with all the probs, mentioned it around Christmas but still running out to the BBQ every 20min at the final stages of the cook, I put a beer fridge next to the BBQ...... two birds 

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For all you low and slowers out there Bunnings now have pink butchers paper for $10 which is pretty damn cheap compared to other sellers.

 

 

 

 

 

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