Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
MrRogers

"door to somewhere in your front yard" service

Recommended Posts

This is what you call "door to somewhere in your front yard" service.

 

Does it get better than this?

post-107767-0-55306200-1441875328_thumb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest gmdb

Are they basically saying, "we will not take care to deliver your goods unless they are insured?"  Or worse, "You cannot rely on us to deliver your goods safely." 

 

Both of which seem to suggest that no one should ever ship anything with these guys and they shouldn't be in the business. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Muon

Not very smart...*sheds a tear* poor turntables :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't get me started!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


After reading the entire article, I think it only stands to reason that the sender is an idiot. Fine, the goods appear to have been dropped on the other side of the fence but that does not excuse the sender for failure to take out the appropriate levels of cover for the item before sending it in transit with Smart Send/Star Track. If the items are worth so much, how difficult was it to insure the items beforehand?

 

 

Signature on delivery does not cost alot of money. Insurance is worth while for the majority of items sent anywhere via Australia Post or any other handling service, to protect all parties in any transaction for goods. I bet the carton depicted in the picture from the article weighs alot more than 5kg so it stands to reason that, without the occupant being at home, the delivery driver would have thought it would be all right to deposit the goods on the other side of the fence. I still think it is risky sending any turntable, no matter what the cost of it, via a parcel service unless you know how to disassemble the platter, etc. and pack individual parts carefully. 

 

 

Couriers aren't oxen but are expected to treat everything with utmost care in their roles. It's interesting that there is no "Fragile Handle With Care" tape wrapping the item. I don't feel sympathy which seems to be what the Daily Telegraph has implied the reader should feel from the byline of the article.

 

 

Brett.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Muon

I have had Toll people drop deliveries from thigh height in front of me! once it was a samsung monitor.......the impact was enough to open the casing so the panel was floating between the two halves :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading the entire article, I think it only stands to reason that the sender is an idiot. Fine, the goods appear to have been dropped on the other side of the fence but that does not excuse the sender for failure to take out the appropriate levels of cover for the item before sending it in transit with Smart Send/Star Track. If the items are worth so much, how difficult was it to insure the items beforehand?

 

Signature on delivery does not cost alot of money. Insurance is worth while for the majority of items sent anywhere via Australia Post or any other handling service, to protect all parties in any transaction for goods.

Brett.

 

Now you mentioned "insurance", Brett ... but my understanding when you do take out insurance when you send stuff via A/Post, for instance ... is that they will only pay if the item:

  • goes missing (ie. does not arrive, and you've paid for tracking/sign for delivery), or
  • is totally destroyed - like, if the delivery truck caught on fire.

They will not pay out for "damage" - which is what happened here.

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 It's interesting that there is no "Fragile Handle With Care" tape wrapping the item. I don't feel sympathy which seems to be what the Daily Telegraph has implied the reader should feel from the byline of the article.

 

 

Brett.

 

 It's interesting that there is no "Fragile Handle With Care" tape wrapping the item. I don't feel sympathy which seems to be what the Daily Telegraph has implied the reader should feel from the byline of the article.

 

 

Brett.

 

IMO, "Fragile Handle with Care" is just begging for trouble, and it appears I might be right:

 

"One disheartening result was that our package received more abuse when marked "Fragile" or "This Side Up." The carriers flipped the package more, and it registered above-average acceleration spikes during trips for which we requested careful treatment"

http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/reviews/a6284/which-shipping-company-is-kindest-to-your-packages/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Guest Muon

@@Jesco

 

Yup!

 

Adding "Fragile Handle With Care" to the package is just asking for it to be used as a football! or basketball!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A goodly number of years ago, a friend was living in a "down market" apartment. As he couldn't afford the many locks that others used, he posted "WARNING--illegal entry will trigger a thermo-nuclear device" on the door.

 

When the whole set of units got done over, his was the only flat that didn't get burgled!

 

Of course the couriers may just refuse to deliver atomic bombs.  :D

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading the entire article, I think it only stands to reason that the sender is an idiot. Fine, the goods appear to have been dropped on the other side of the fence but that does not excuse the sender for failure to take out the appropriate levels of cover for the item before sending it in transit with Smart Send/Star Track. If the items are worth so much, how difficult was it to insure the items beforehand?

 

 

Signature on delivery does not cost alot of money. Insurance is worth while for the majority of items sent anywhere via Australia Post or any other handling service, to protect all parties in any transaction for goods. I bet the carton depicted in the picture from the article weighs alot more than 5kg so it stands to reason that, without the occupant being at home, the delivery driver would have thought it would be all right to deposit the goods on the other side of the fence. I still think it is risky sending any turntable, no matter what the cost of it, via a parcel service unless you know how to disassemble the platter, etc. and pack individual parts carefully. 

 

 

Couriers aren't oxen but are expected to treat everything with utmost care in their roles. It's interesting that there is no "Fragile Handle With Care" tape wrapping the item. I don't feel sympathy which seems to be what the Daily Telegraph has implied the reader should feel from the byline of the article.

 

 

Brett.

From what I understand a big handle with care sign only invites the parcel to be tossed around. I have bought a few items which were shipped and in most cases the vendor did not highlight the items were fragile.

 

I would never ship without insurance it just isn't worth the risk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Terrified when I saw this, thanks for posting

 

Have just won a bid on a Micro Seiki 611 Vintage TT to be sent to Tassie from Bendigo. A few dollars worth of Insurance and " advise of, pick up at Depot Tasmania End" will be put on this one. I usually like to pick up fragile items at the Depot as is saves the Courier re packing it  in to the delivery van, one less set of hands.

 

Cheers

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Are they basically saying, "we will not take care to deliver your goods unless they are insured?"  Or worse, "You cannot rely on us to deliver your goods safely." 

 

No  :-)    They are saying "we took care of the goods in the best way we could under the circumstances".    Very big difference.

 

 

I deal with these cretins a lot (unfortunately - it is out of my control).   Last time I check (I have had disputes), there is not a single word on their website promising or alluding to, any "safe" carriage of your goods.  Eg.  their "why startrack" page.    What this means is that it is difficult (or impossible) to make a case of "service not as described or reasonably expected".   They make claims about getting good to the right place at the right time... but nothing ever anywhere about condition, care, etc.

 

 

They left > $150k worth of IT equipment in a driveway, in the rain ...... because nobody answered a service door, and they couldn't walk around to the front of the building (reception desk) ....  no telephone, nothing.   Only discovered it hours later when we got asked why we were blocking the driveway

 

..... this is after the delivery was > 2 weeks late, because the pallet was misplaced in their warehouse, while they sent us on a wild goose chase blaming the supplier (they had it all along).     A co-worker actually made the comment  "these guys must be morons.... why would you even admit to that.... I would have just lied".

 

 

I don't feel sympathy

 

Nor I.... but I think it serves as a good warning to people wrt expectations   (ie.  don't have them).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's all very scary. I guess the best bet is to make sure delivery is to an occupied premises. Whether that be the depot, your work place or a post office. Limiting the handling is the key I reckon..and insurance, always insurance!!

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading the entire article, I think it only stands to reason that the sender is an idiot.Perhaps so, but that is no excuse for incompetence and utter lack of care by the courier. Two wrongs do not make a right. Fine, the goods appear to have been dropped on the other side of the fence If the sender was informed that this would happen if no insurance was taken out when sending the item,one could then make an informed dedision. but that does not excuse the sender for failure to take out the appropriate levels of cover for the item before sending it in transit with Smart Send/Star Track. If the items are worth so much, how difficult was it to insure the items beforehand? Not very, I agree.

 

 

Signature on delivery does not cost alot of money. Insurance is worth while for the majority of items sent anywhere via Australia Post or any other handling service, to protect all parties in any transaction for goods. I bet the carton depicted in the picture from the article weighs alot more than 5kg so it stands to reason that, without the occupant being at home, the delivery driver would have thought it would be all right to deposit the goods on the other side of the fence. So the fact that the item weighs more than 5KG gives the courier the right to treat the good like a sack of schit? I still think it is risky sending any turntable, no matter what the cost of it, via a parcel service unless you know how to disassemble the platter, etc. and pack individual parts carefully. 

 

 

Couriers aren't oxen no, but they seem to be almost on the same intelligence level. but are expected to treat everything with utmost care in their roles. Correct. When I send a parcel I expect and pay for a certain level of competence in making sure the item arrives in one piece. It's interesting that there is no "Fragile Handle With Care" tape wrapping the item. I am sure you do not seriously believe this has any mitigating effect on how an item is handled during transit and upon loading or unloading?

Edited by rantan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never forget that 50% of the population has a below average IQ.

 

Seems most of them work in the delivery industry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Never forget that 50% of the population has a below average IQ.

 

Seems most of them work in the delivery industry.

 

Actually, I suspect this depends on what 'statistic' you use! ;)

 

Do you count babies in the population?

Do you count dementia-ed seniors?

etc.  (I can't say anything more, having recently received a 'warning' from a moderator.)

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Post Office takes parcels that big for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Post Office takes parcels that big for me.

 

So a courier service (TNT, UPS, Fasttrack ...) will deliver to a PO? :confused:

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.

Edited by rantan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So a courier service (TNT, UPS, Fasttrack ...) will deliver to a PO? :confused:

 

Andy

 

It was Startrack.

It is owned by Australia Post............and yes, they can and do deliver to Post Offices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest yamaha_man

If he'd had have bought a decent turntable the courier wouldn't have been able to lift it high enough to throw it over the fence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was Startrack.

It is owned by Australia Post............and yes, they can and do deliver to Post Offices.

 

Aaah, OK.  Thanks LP.

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If he'd had have bought a decent turntable the courier wouldn't have been able to lift it high enough to throw it over the fence.

 

Now you're being cruel, YM. :P

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest yamaha_man

Now you're being cruel, YM. :P

 

Andy

Just saying it how l see it from my closed mind point of view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...