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Cafad

Integrated Amps: An Addicts Guide Part, The Third.

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Posted (edited)

How can i say no to my original offer, i am looking at a vintage sansui at the moment, not sure of the exposure's future, sent a message to Gazer01 who is looking for an amp with pre outs, he has the 1010, the 2010 has pre outs,the Quasimodo is unbelievable in my set up, be interested in how the Sansui will sound, will be back home on Tuesday, will send the amp then, cheers Wen

Edited by wen

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@Cafad there are so many models to choose from, can you give a clue for a 60-70wpc reliable every day use sansui?from your experience, don't know if this is the impossible question

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I can do better than suggest, I can supply you with one.  :yes:  

Hang on, I see a PM, I'd best get to answering it.  

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IMG_0983.thumb.JPG.ab9c832ef16e9e9e9b692636df7dbb49.JPG

 

TACT S2150

 

Time to take a trip back in time to the source of all things good about class D amps.  Back in 2003 TACT was doing some ground-breaking work that the better class D amps of today have clearly benefited from.  Many class D amps are dynamic to a fault while sacrificing top end listenability and mid range sweetness, in some cases this “standard class D personality” works but in others it very much does not.  It can depend a great deal on the genre of music being played and the system it is played on.  Class D amps can make small systems sound bigger and more punchy than they usually do and I suspect it is this very trait that has made them so popular in the world at large.

 

However TACT took the traditional class D topology and refined it, embraced it to the point of removing the whole idea of a separate DAC.  Instead they performed a signal conversion on the PCM signal, converting it to a PWM signal that is then used to feed into the class D module directly.  I’ve heard several cheaper amps that do this, the QLS QA-100, the later QLS model QA-690, the Wadia 151, the POPU D5 and Venus models, the Nuprime IDA-8, though the IDA-8 has a conventional DAC (and the Nuforce DA-100, which was the least impressive of all of them to my ears).  All of these are decent amps in their own right (and at their own price points) but none are close to a match for the TACT.  The Classe Sigma 2200i is a similar design and it plays to its strengths a little more, the 2200i is, in my opinion, a better amp than the TACT S2150 but since it came along 13 years later and likely owes much of its design to the work done by TACT then that is no real surprise.

 

The big thing about the TACT S2150 is that it up samples to 384KHz, it is true that there is some gear out there that does this now but back in 2003 this was massive.  It also controls volume differently, I’m not sure I fully understand this but it seems to drop the voltage of the power supply in order to drop the volume.  Normally the volume is controlled by decreasing the voltage of the music signal while the power supply voltage is constant (or as near to constant as it can be kept) so this is different.

 

TACT also had some kick-ass room correction tech, some of which is usable with the S2150.  To get the most out of it though you need to use multiple amps as you can adjust both gain and crossover settings.  I believe the dedicated preamp was something of a legend in the area of signal control and gave you a load of choices if you were a bi or tri-amper.

 

The S2150 is a good amp, and it is not an amp that sounds like a class D design.  Its vocals are top notch and slower music is so resonant and poignant that you would swear you were listening to a $5K amp produced by a niche design house.  It does well on faster music but on fast and hard music with multiple instruments and vocals it isn’t as impressive as it is on the slower stuff.  It is far from alone in this regard, many amps have issues with separation and soundstaging when more than 4 sounds are competing for attention.  If I were reviewing the S2150 15 years ago I would have been very impressed, possibly even astounded, today I look at it and think thoughts like, “So that’s where the ideas that carried class D forward started.  You know, even by todays’ standards, it’s very good.”

 

It does have an eccentricity or two however, but I’ll get to those later.  Time to start the details and such.

As is usual I was using my YBA Herritage cd100 as a transport, coax cable was from Geoff at Aurealis, speaker cable was standard old Ugly cable, 10AWG, with banana plug connectors sourced from Jaycar (although I did use the TACT with Redgums speaker cables for several days, I could not detect a significant difference so I don’t believe the TACT to be very fussy when it comes to cables).  And speakers were, as always, my Lenehan S2R stand mounts. 

 

Highs:

Triangles sound almost crystalline and shiny, not really similar to any other amp I’ve heard.  I’m going to have to listen to them 4 or 5 times to get a grip on them I think.  Don’t get me wrong, they sound very good just not metallic enough.  Trumpets are nice and brassy but a little sweet as well.  Crisp metallic sounds seem to revel in their crisp-ness.  Can sound a touch dry when swamped with several instruments at once.   All in all, very good, 7.75.

 

Mids:

Depends greatly on what is going on.  On lighter music the mids are damn good.  Single instrument plus vocals and the TACT is up there with the best of the best, two or three instruments and it’s still very good but throw in four or five and it starts to lose that magic.  8.5 on slower music with a minimal number of instruments down to 7.25 with 4 instruments or more plus vocals.

 

Bass:

The class D “Big Bass Effects” are dialled down with the bass region correlating in with the highs and mids very well.  Impact and follow through are good but they could be a little fuller and deeper.  I don’t think this level of bass would keep a true bass head happy.  I realize it is this slight lessening of the bass that allows the mids to behave as well as they do but since I evaluate them separately I’m afraid the bass score is going to suffer.  Not suffer badly as it still does a good job, but it really isn’t up to the usual class D expectations.  Of course since this is a TACT the fact that it doesn’t sound like a stereotypical class D is the whole point.  7.5

However, as with the mids, if you play music with less instruments involved then the bass is much more satisfying.  Joe Satrianis’ “Hill of the Skull” for instance has excellent bass.  I’d be willing to go up to about 8.25 for that song. 

 

Vocals: 

TACT have really nailed the vocal side of things.  Female vocals are deep, resonant and sweet and Male vocals are clean and smooth with just a touch of gruffness when needed.  8.25 for both.  Nancy Wilson sound so good I’m going to pull out all my Heart albums tomorrow and spin them up.  I may even pop Freddie Mercury’s solo album in too, although the production values on it aren’t top notch so it may not do Freddie justice, worth a try though.

 

Sound staging:

Interestingly enough the vocals image extremely well, instruments in the mids almost as well and then instruments in the highs less and the bass lesser again.  There is a 3D soundstage (which is good news, many class D amps I’ve heard don’t seem to understand what a 3D sound stage is) but it is a little on the shallow side.  I have the distinct feeling that if my room were twice the size then the sound stage would integrate much more effectively, sometimes it felt like each speaker was trying to fill two thirds of the room.  I’m going to give it a 7.0 as a minimum, and up to a 7.75 in the mids and an 8.0 for the vocals.

 

Overall Performance:

Lighter styles of music are an absolute delight to listen to, lighter strings and woodwinds are excellent as are smaller drums, larger drums don’t feel quite as large as they could (unless they are the only instruments in use at the time).   I could certainly live with the TACT, but I think it would skew my listening more to the lighter styles in my collection.  I would probably keep another amp for the heavier stuff.

 

Ability to Emote:

7.5 on lighter styles, 7.5 to 7.0 on faster rock, 7.0 to 6.5 on rock with lighter (or boosted) mid bass.  I was definitely not feeling as much love for the Dire Straits remasters as I usually do (but the originals were pretty good).  Dynamic range crushing is even more evident than usual.

 

Electric Guitar Test:

8.25, very satisfying combination of growl and rumble with just a little edge to it.

 

80’s Rock Test:

7.5 with harder rock, 8.0 with lighter and/or softer rock.

 

In short, an informative and rather impressive, trip down memory lane.  Capability mixed with nostalgia.  That’s what the TACT S2150 is.

 

Now I guess  I need to put a Lyngdorf on my target list.

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Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, Cafad said:

IMG_0983.thumb.JPG.ab9c832ef16e9e9e9b692636df7dbb49.JPG

 

TACT S2150

 

Time to take a trip back in time to the source of all things good about class D amps.  Back in 2003 TACT was doing some ground-breaking work that the better class D amps of today have clearly benefited from.  Many class D amps are dynamic to a fault while sacrificing top end listenability and mid range sweetness, in some cases this “standard class D personality” works but in others it very much does not.  It can depend a great deal on the genre of music being played and the system it is played on.  Class D amps can make small systems sound bigger and more punchy than they usually do and I suspect it is this very trait that has made them so popular in the world at large.

 

However TACT took the traditional class D topology and refined it, embraced it to the point of removing the whole idea of a separate DAC.  Instead they performed a signal conversion on the PCM signal, converting it to a PWM signal that is then used to feed into the class D module directly.  I’ve heard several cheaper amps that do this, the QLS QA-100, the later QLS model QA-690, the Wadia 151, the POPU D5 and Venus models, the Nuprime IDA-8, though the IDA-8 has a conventional DAC (and the Nuforce DA-100, which was the least impressive of all of them to my ears).  All of these are decent amps in their own right (and at their own price points) but none are close to a match for the TACT.  The Classe Sigma 2200i is a similar design and it plays to its strengths a little more, the 2200i is, in my opinion, a better amp than the TACT S2150 but since it came along 13 years later and likely owes much of its design to the work done by TACT then that is no real surprise.

 

The big thing about the TACT S2150 is that it up samples to 384KHz, it is true that there is some gear out there that does this now but back in 2003 this was massive.  It also controls volume differently, I’m not sure I fully understand this but it seems to drop the voltage of the power supply in order to drop the volume.  Normally the volume is controlled by decreasing the voltage of the music signal while the power supply voltage is constant (or as near to constant as it can be kept) so this is different.

 

TACT also had some kick-ass room correction tech, some of which is usable with the S2150.  To get the most out of it though you need to use multiple amps as you can adjust both gain and crossover settings.  I believe the dedicated preamp was something of a legend in the area of signal control and gave you a load of choices if you were a bi or tri-amper.

 

The S2150 is a good amp, and it is not an amp that sounds like a class D design.  Its vocals are top notch and slower music is so resonant and poignant that you would swear you were listening to a $5K amp produced by a niche design house.  It does well on faster music but on fast and hard music with multiple instruments and vocals it isn’t as impressive as it is on the slower stuff.  It is far from alone in this regard, many amps have issues with separation and soundstaging when more than 4 sounds are competing for attention.  If I were reviewing the S2150 15 years ago I would have been very impressed, possibly even astounded, today I look at it and think thoughts like, “So that’s where the ideas that carried class D forward started.  You know, even by todays’ standards, it’s very good.”

 

It does have an eccentricity or two however, but I’ll get to those later.  Time to start the details and such.

As is usual I was using my YBA Herritage cd100 as a transport, coax cable was from Geoff at Aurealis, speaker cable was standard old Ugly cable, 10AWG, with banana plug connectors sourced from Jaycar (although I did use the TACT with Redgums speaker cables for several days, I could not detect a significant difference so I don’t believe the TACT to be very fussy when it comes to cables).  And speakers were, as always, my Lenehan S2R stand mounts. 

 

Highs:

Triangles sound almost crystalline and shiny, not really similar to any other amp I’ve heard.  I’m going to have to listen to them 4 or 5 times to get a grip on them I think.  Don’t get me wrong, they sound very good just not metallic enough.  Trumpets are nice and brassy but a little sweet as well.  Crisp metallic sounds seem to revel in their crisp-ness.  Can sound a touch dry when swamped with several instruments at once.   All in all, very good, 7.75.

 

Mids:

Depends greatly on what is going on.  On lighter music the mids are damn good.  Single instrument plus vocals and the TACT is up there with the best of the best, two or three instruments and it’s still very good but throw in four or five and it starts to lose that magic.  8.5 on slower music with a minimal number of instruments down to 7.25 with 4 instruments or more plus vocals.

 

Bass:

The class D “Big Bass Effects” are dialled down with the bass region correlating in with the highs and mids very well.  Impact and follow through are good but they could be a little fuller and deeper.  I don’t think this level of bass would keep a true bass head happy.  I realize it is this slight lessening of the bass that allows the mids to behave as well as they do but since I evaluate them separately I’m afraid the bass score is going to suffer.  Not suffer badly as it still does a good job, but it really isn’t up to the usual class D expectations.  Of course since this is a TACT the fact that it doesn’t sound like a stereotypical class D is the whole point.  7.5

However, as with the mids, if you play music with less instruments involved then the bass is much more satisfying.  Joe Satrianis’ “Hill of the Skull” for instance has excellent bass.  I’d be willing to go up to about 8.25 for that song. 

 

Vocals: 

TACT have really nailed the vocal side of things.  Female vocals are deep, resonant and sweet and Male vocals are clean and smooth with just a touch of gruffness when needed.  8.25 for both.  Nancy Wilson sound so good I’m going to pull out all my Heart albums tomorrow and spin them up.  I may even pop Freddie Mercury’s solo album in too, although the production values on it aren’t top notch so it may not do Freddie justice, worth a try though.

 

Sound staging:

Interestingly enough the vocals image extremely well, instruments in the mids almost as well and then instruments in the highs less and the bass lesser again.  There is a 3D soundstage (which is good news, many class D amps I’ve heard don’t seem to understand what a 3D sound stage is) but it is a little on the shallow side.  I have the distinct feeling that if my room were twice the size then the sound stage would integrate much more effectively, sometimes it felt like each speaker was trying to fill two thirds of the room.  I’m going to give it a 7.0 as a minimum, and up to a 7.75 in the mids and an 8.0 for the vocals.

 

Overall Performance:

Lighter styles of music are an absolute delight to listen to, lighter strings and woodwinds are excellent as are smaller drums, larger drums don’t feel quite as large as they could (unless they are the only instruments in use at the time).   I could certainly live with the TACT, but I think it would skew my listening more to the lighter styles in my collection.  I would probably keep another amp for the heavier stuff.

 

Ability to Emote:

7.5 on lighter styles, 7.5 to 7.0 on faster rock, 7.0 to 6.5 on rock with lighter (or boosted) mid bass.  I was definitely not feeling as much love for the Dire Straits remasters as I usually do (but the originals were pretty good).  Dynamic range crushing is even more evident than usual.

 

Electric Guitar Test:

8.25, very satisfying combination of growl and rumble with just a little edge to it.

 

80’s Rock Test:

7.5 with harder rock, 8.0 with lighter and/or softer rock.

 

In short, an informative and rather impressive, trip down memory lane.  Capability mixed with nostalgia.  That’s what the TACT S2150 is.

 

Now I guess  I need to put a Lyngdorf on my target list.

My first proper audiophile amplifier was a TACT Millenium MK2. (Which later went to the Lyngdorf brand)

 

It was a very good sounding amplifier and being pure digital in it was very much ahead of its time.

The build quality was exceptional too.

 

C0EB6DB8-2330-4A6F-B2E9-3104CAD28FEA.thumb.jpeg.8eb74b64faa066a0f36d9fbbadc42e3d.jpeg

Edited by Martykt

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Thanks Cafad for that excellent review of one of my favourite amps.  I was an early adopter of TacT gear and bought my first room correction preamp in around 2004.  It's still in perfect condition and serves as a handy spare pre.  Given that it has both digital and analogue inputs and digital and analogue outputs, it's incredibly versatile and it's built like a tank

 

In around 2006, I upgraded to the RCS 2.2XP (keeping the original RCS 2.0) and added the 2150.  Although I could never really come to terms with the room correction (probably just too complex for this old dinosaur!), I've always found this combo to be very useful, versatile and competent performers.  Boz was the epitome of the "flawed genius" and it appears to me he tried to be all aspects of his business instead of leaving the commercial aspects to someone with the appropriate skills.  The "divorce" from Peter Lyngdorf was always going to see Boz and TacT founder and, sadly. it did.

 

Anyway, the RCS 2.0 gets occasional use as a back-up preamp and the RCS 2.2XP and 2150 combo is in continuous, ongoing use in the family room and makes a pair of the ubiquitous NS1000M's sound  pretty much like I think NS1000M's should - ie superb within certain inherent limitations in the bass area.  We had some rellies for lunch today and the family room system has gradually climbed up to enjoyable volumes (it's still very sweet at background listening levels) and it's sounding gorgeous to me ATM.

 

Might snap a couple of pics to illustrate this post::)

 

736250551_DSC_4991(2).thumb.JPG.e1d0a1a99162020834cfe1071762caae.JPG

 

 

619462331_DSC_4992(2).thumb.JPG.6209457e08a43e767f2974ac3bed3532.JPG

 

 

I really disagree with those who assert "All class D sounds like crap"  I wish they could hear what I'm hearing right now!

 

Thanks again for giving this lovely gear a rare bit of exposure.:thumb:

 

 

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Tony M said:

Thanks Cafad for that excellent review of one of my favourite amps.  I was an early adopter of TacT gear and bought my first room correction preamp in around 2004.  It's still in perfect condition and serves as a handy spare pre.  Given that it has both digital and analogue inputs and digital and analogue outputs, it's incredibly versatile and it's built like a tank

 

In around 2006, I upgraded to the RCS 2.2XP (keeping the original RCS 2.0) and added the 2150.  Although I could never really come to terms with the room correction (probably just too complex for this old dinosaur!), I've always found this combo to be very useful, versatile and competent performers.  Boz was the epitome of the "flawed genius" and it appears to me he tried to be all aspects of his business instead of leaving the commercial aspects to someone with the appropriate skills.  The "divorce" from Peter Lyngdorf was always going to see Boz and TacT founder and, sadly. it did.

 

Anyway, the RCS 2.0 gets occasional use as a back-up preamp and the RCS 2.2XP and 2150 combo is in continuous, ongoing use in the family room and makes a pair of the ubiquitous NS1000M's sound  pretty much like I think NS1000M's should - ie superb within certain inherent limitations in the bass area.  We had some rellies for lunch today and the family room system has gradually climbed up to enjoyable volumes (it's still very sweet at background listening levels) and it's sounding gorgeous to me ATM.

 

Might snap a couple of pics to illustrate this post::)

 

736250551_DSC_4991(2).thumb.JPG.e1d0a1a99162020834cfe1071762caae.JPG

 

 

619462331_DSC_4992(2).thumb.JPG.6209457e08a43e767f2974ac3bed3532.JPG

 

 

I really disagree with those who assert "All class D sounds like crap"  I wish they could hear what I'm hearing right now!

 

Thanks again for giving this lovely gear a rare bit of exposure.:thumb:

 

 

It was my absolute pleasure Tony.  I had not heard of TACT as such but once I was made aware of their story I just had to hear one.  They are a piece of audio history, in both the fact that they are a technological first and that the company stands as an example of how a company can fail in the industry even though they have a series of products that are original and excellent quality.  It is a pity that they don't exist any more but at least they did exist and can still be found if you look hard enough.

Edited by Cafad

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FWIW, I should mention there is quite an active International forum (TactAudioUsersGroup) at yahoogroups.com

 

It's a fantastic resource sharing info, software, service tips and selling and buying leads.  You can download encyclopedia-sized manuals to assist with room correction etc.  I did so, but I have yet to find the time and inclination to master it as it's pretty complex.

 

There are quite a few real enthusiasts around the world  keeping the brand alive.

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Where abouts are you located Tony?
I have the RCS and TCS and have found little to touch them. I have Tip and Hans-Martin very helpful when advice is needed!

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On 14/06/2019 at 5:44 AM, ZOOTYtooty said:

Where abouts are you located Tony?
I have the RCS and TCS and have found little to touch them. I have Tip and Hans-Martin very helpful when advice is needed!

Sorry, I just saw this post.  I'm at Hahndorf, in the Adelaide Hills - quite a few audio enthusiasts around here.

 

I totally agree the support of those guys on the TacT forum is fantastic.  Just one example was the analogue (or was it digital - just can't remeber for sure ATM which it was) input board of my 2.2XP failed.  From the symptoms, they were able to tell me that 4 small SMC caps neede to be replaced.  I was able to take the board out, drop it into a local computer repair shop and get it fixed by asking them to replace  specific caps.  Totally modular design is just great - no need to take the whole unit in.  I think it cost something like $50!

 

I have high hopes of keeping my Tact gear fully funtional for a long time

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Thanks for the reply, had some friends over tonight and ended up in the music room!
Imagine where TacT ad a company would have been by now?!1561804133288.jpeg

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I've been enjoying my Classe Sigma 2200i lately on my ML2 Limited speakers.  The Classe being my favourite amp of all time (or possibly "so far") on the S2Rs.

It was pretty good, and I enjoyed it quite a bit for about a fortnight.  But on Saturday I felt the urge to change amps once again.  I was temped to change back to the Sansui 907 NRA (or any other Sansui) but I'd already listened to it on the ML2s so instead I went with Simons Zeus Integrated.  My oh my am I glad I did!

The Zeus has the grunt needed to make the ML2s produce bass and in fact when compared with the Zeus the Classe sounded a bit on the thin side.  I liked the Zeus  on the S2Rs, while it wasn't in my top 3 it was certainly in my top 5 or 6, but on the ML2s I think it will do considerably better in its placing.  It doesn't have the detail or the soundstaging of the Classe (I think I need a bigger room, something I am regularly reminded of with the larger amps) but damn it has some addictive dynamics and such smooth, easy bass when compared to the Classe.  I'll have to do some back to back comparisons at some point in the near future but for now I think the Zeus is certainly in the running for best ML2 integrated in my lounge room.

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Posted (edited)

IMG_1099.thumb.JPG.b721aa7a57d02b9d45e0584358e84ad6.JPG

 

I love integrated amplifier themed Sundays, I really do.

I've had the Classe Sigma 2200i in use, and replaced it with the Zeus and found I liked the Zeus more and that's given me the motivation to go ahead and do some comparing.

 

The Zeus plays to several of the strengths of the ML2s, one is the smooth presentation, another is the deep feel that the background has and a third is the deep bass (but only if the amp is up to the task).  The Zeus does all of these things well.  The only thing I miss is the soundstage as (as I've said before) it is too big for the room once you give it some volume.  I am prepared to live with this as I consider it only a minor inconvenience.

The ATC SIA2-150 is a slightly faster sounding amp than the Zeus, slightly more focused on impact and slightly less on follow through (this is not a surprise at all when you look at the power comparison, 150 watts for the ATC and 250 watts for the Zeus, 20,000 uF filtering capacitance per channel for the ATC and 44,000 uF for the Zeus).  Also there is a bit more of an edge to the ATC, not really a hard edge more of a difficult-to-explain differently textured edge.  It works as a minor positive for some songs and a minor negative for others, it can add a little sparkle to piano and strings but it can also add a little bit of twang to steely guitar and brass.  Not a deal breaker, I could live with it, but in the longer term I'd probably be playing around with interconnects in an effort to either minimize it or better understand it.  

The Sansui 907 NRA, when used via its "power amp direct" inputs (which are not actually power amp direct inputs as they still pass through a volume control) the sound is polite, pure and highly polished.  There is a bit less detail than the ATC but just as much presence, slightly less impact too but those vocals more than make up for it.  Vocals from the other amps were both very good but the NRA continues to dominate when playing hard sung vocals at high volumes.  There is a slightly less exciting feel to the NRA when compared to the other two amps but that polished, slightly laid back shine is just a joy to listen to.

When used via its integrated inputs the NRA gains detail and impact, this works well at lower volume levels but if you crank it up past about 10 o'clock it starts to get a bit peaky and harsh.  Too much gain in the system I expect.  I've only had it up to 3 o'clock via the "power amp direct" inputs but it doesn't get harsh at all, just louder, full bodied and amazing.

 

So which one is the winner?  Good question!

I'm leaning towards the Zeus as a general all round winner but if I get the urge to take an extra-long trip down female vocals lane I think I'd change over to the Sansui.  The ACT does not exactly disappoint, I've happily had it running in the system for a week or so prior to yesterday, but it does lose out (even if only just) on sheer power delivery to the Zeus and on the quality of the final finish to the Sansui.

 

So there you have it, Zeus first, Sansui 907 NRA second and ATC SIA2-150 third.  Close enough that if it was a horse race only the people seated on the finish line would have known who won without the assistance of a photo finish.

 

There is more to come, but it belongs elsewhere.

 

Edited by Cafad

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d5f18572c48086af4acb4b578fd09c11.jpg
The Zeus has actually got 8 of these 22000uf 100v caps in it. Total of 176000uf in the power supply. And another 2000uf each on the amplifier boards.

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Terribly sorry, make that 88,000 uF filtering capacity per channel for the Zeus.  So almost 4.5 times the capacitance of the ATC, not 'only' 2.2 times.

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      Item Condition: As New
      Reason for selling: Someone elses turn to have a listen. Your ears will love you for it.
      Payment Method: Cash, Paypal, Bank Transfer, COD
      Extra Info:
       
       
      Purchased in August 2018, Australian Model, Accuphase warranty is 5 years.
      Includes all original double boxing, remote control, manuals, power cables .
      Willing to ship at buyers expense, boxed up it is around 30kg.
       
      Links: 
      Amp : http://www.accuphase.com/cat/e-470_e.pdf
       
      Reviews
      https://audiofi.net/2018/09/accuphase-e-470-integrated-amplifier-one-for-a-lifetime/
       
      Photos:
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

    • By stoobleh
      Item: Pro-Ject Stream Box RS + Amp Box RS (both with high spec linear power supplies and tube upgrades)
      Location: Sydney
      Price: $2400 (pick up) / $2450 (shipped) 
      Item Condition: Excellent !!! (no marks or scuffs)
      Reason for selling: $ (hence the sharp price)
      Payment Method: Direct transfer, PayPal (friends), Pickup - Cash (Alexandria or Caringbah)
      Extra Info: Used very lightly. Ace condition. Not a mark on them. Smoke free, pet free. All those good things.
       
      This combo is great for the minimalists out there or as Darko would say Kallax fi.
      For those of you who have a high end set up already this pair would make a great second system. 
      I have tested the amp with Focal floor standers and it handled the test with ease. 
      The free app from Pro-ject works really well. Tidal and Spotify integration.
       
      Both Streamer and Amp have original boxes for shipping.
       
      Whats included:
      - Pro-ject Stream Box Rs (inc remote but I only used the iPhone app)
      - Pro-ject Amp Box RS
      - Linear Power supplies for both components inc IEC's
      - DC link cables to linear PSU's
      - Genelex Gold Lions x 2(Cryoset)
      - Reflektor 6H23P x 2 (Tube Store)
      - Electro Harmonix x 4
       
      Streamer pre amp uses the renowned Burr Brown DAC and a tube output stage (6992's). 
      Was purchased new from Apollo Hi-Fi in Sydney.
      Has analog input to feed a turntable (via phono stage) or CD player straight in.
      Streaming from your computer does not sound like this!
      Tidal and spotify integration using the free Pro-ject app on iphone or iPad is good.
       
      Streamer includes switch mode psu and custom linear psu from Swagman with Nuvotem transformer. Certainly makes a difference!
      Cost around $300 from memory. 
       
      The Amp linear power supply is crazy good build quality. Great components and provides a lot of extra output from the amp.
      Bass control is sublime with this amp PSU combo. The tubes add a lovely rounded finish to to the sound.
      The Amp power supply is worth $650 alone (I know, but it provides a lot of extra output for amp) 
       
      I've taken the lid off both units to show how clean and well kept the units are.
      Taken loads of photos for you:
       










       



       
      Edited July 13 by stoobleh








         
    • By WagonWheel
      Item: Primare i22 integrated amplifier with optional DAC
      Location: Melbourne
      Price: $700
      Item Condition: Good see pics
      Reason for selling: Upgraded to an active system.
      Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only
      Extra Info:
      Bought this off another member a bit over a year ago, used lightly since then. Have driven my Dynaudio speaker’s beautifully.
       
      This 80W Primare punches out loud bass effortlessly and for a class D amp it is surprisingly smooth, detailed and quiet. Have loved having it but it is no longer needed as I’ve moved to an active system.
       
      It has a very decent on-board DAC that can also to be bypassed. 
      Comes with original remote.
       
      The previous owner had a couple of scratches on the top rear panel, the photos makes it worse as it's hard to notice normally.  I've priced this unit quite low with this in mind.
       
      Local pickup preferred but I can also ship on your expense.
       
      A few reviews:
      http://www.tonepublications.com/review/the-primare-i22-integrated/
      http://www.hifichoice.co.uk/news/article/primare-i22-integrated-and-and-cd22-cd-player-pound;1250-ea/8868
       
      Specifications:
      Output Power 2x80W/8, 2x160W/4
      Analogue Inputs 4 pair RCA (L & R)
      Optional DAC Board:
      1x USB-B input
      1x Digital Optical input (1 TOSLINK)
      1x Digital Coaxial input (1 RCA jack)
      Analogue Record Output 1 pair RCA (L & R)
      Pre Out 1 pair RCA (L & R)
      Frequency Response 10Hz – 20kHz, -0.5dB
      THD + N < 0.05%, 20Hz – 20kHz
      Signal to Noise -95dB
      Power Consumption Standby: 0.3W; Operate: 19W
      Dimensions (wxdxh) 430 x 420 x 106 mm
      Net weight 10 kg
      Gross weight 12.5 kg
       
      Photos: Advertisements without photos of the actual item will not be approved.



    • By Max Headroom
      Item: NAD C 375BEE Integrated Amplifier including OPTIONAL DAC and Phono stage - Does not include C 275BEE power amp in pic, see separately listed sale
      Location: Williamstown VIC 3016
      Price: $999 Now $900
      Item Condition: Excellent
      Reason for selling: I'm so impressed that I'm looking to move up to the NAD Master Series
      Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only
      Extra Info:
       
      Update no other c375 sold on StereoNet has had the phono card and dac card installed - you’re getting a whole digital/phono integrated solution in one. Great value for this level of sound quality, power and convenience!
       
      What can I say to express how good this amp is? Probably that I am so impressed I am looking at buying into the NAD Master Series once I sell this amp. Just to give you an idea of how good these amps are and how impressed I am, my other amps are Audio Research. 
       
      This integrated has lots of trickle down technology from the NAD Masters Series M3 Amplifier. These include application of Bjørn Erik Edvardsen’s Distortion Canceling Circuit in the output stage and BEE Clamp in the power supply, with distortion and noise reduced down to unprecedented levels. Distortion and frequency response figures are very impressive – midband distortion staying in the region of 0.001 per cent even at 200 watts output. That's not a trivial thing to achieve!
       
      I need to have Solid State amps to use when
      a: I feel like a change
      b: I'm listening but I'm working or being distracted and I don't want my valve amps going for nothing
      c : I need some serious power!
       
      https://nadelectronics.com/product/c-375bee-integrated-amplifier/
       
      Ignore what some of the reviews on here and around the net say, this amp is refined, powerful and musical. (Seriously, the What HiFi reviewer must've been smoking something). BUT to get quality out of this amplifier you need to get rid of the standard metal jumpers between the pre-power sections of this amp and use some decent interconnects. THEN you really get to hear this amp... I don't know why anyone or any reviewer would bother with the standard jumpers, they really downgrade the sound and hurt the reviews. This amp really responds to having high quality and revealing interconnects used with it, especially as the link between the pre-power sections. I used some silver/copper Aurealis cables as the jumper cables and the sound was superb (they're not expensive at all). Putting better cables in place of them only improves things.
       
      Inside this amp its full of high quality components and also a couple of completely enclosed 'class A gain modules', which are evidently NAD's answer to the ubiquitous op-amp.
       
      And this amp has power to spare, and can drive loads down to 2ohms without breaking a sweat. The official figures are: 250W, 410W, 600W IHF Dynamic power into 8, 4 and 2 Ohms, respectively. But in the real world the 8ohm power is closer to 200 watts according to various reviews online.
       
       
      Reviews:
      From Stereophile:
      "The 150Wpc C 375BEE offers five line-level outputs, two sets of preamp outputs, a front-panel minijack for portable music players, a built-in headphone amp, and an optional phono stage. Like models in NAD’s Masters Series, the C 375BEE uses PowerDrive technology to maximize the dynamic power sent to the speakers. ...the C 375BEE’s overall sound was tight, dynamic, and fast, with crystalline highs and well-extended bass. “A competition crusher,” concluded Sam. Though he admits the NAD belongs in Class B, he’d choose it over many of the amplifiers in Class A. “So good, for so little money, that few are willing to believe it. Are you, JA?” he asks. (Vol.32 No.10)
       
      From TechRadar:
      "Faced with a powerhouse like this, there's a strong temptation to load up a noisy disc at the outset, wind the volume control up high and settle back for some good old aural abuse. We did exactly that, but were rather taken aback by the results. We've used high-powered NAD amps before and always found them enjoyable, if not always well controlled or revealing at high power. This one breaks that tradition, for it offers some of the best control we've heard at anything like the price.
       
      We weren't exactly using the world's easiest speakers, either. The Bowers and Wilkins 803S is a fairly tricky load and needs a firm hand to keep the bass precise, but the 375Bee proves more than ready for the challenge. even when delivering peaks close to the 200 watts threshold (which was louder then we were comfortable with) there was no sense of strain, nor of the shift of focus that often occurs when amps start to run out of puff – loud bass making the midrange and treble wilt, and vice-versa.
       
      As a result, we spent a lot of time revelling in the classy combination of power and control which the amplifier offers.
       
      As we've mentioned before in these pages, classical music tends to have wider dynamics than most other styles and hence benefits most from high power output, and indeed we found ready use for the power in uncompressed symphony orchestra recordings. Bass drum and timpani rarely sound so vivid!
       
      There is also a lot to admire and enjoy at more modest volumes. Another break with early high-power NAD amps is in the high degree of neutrality across the midrange. Previously, we've had some limitations about the degree of naturalness in voices, but on this occasion we find it very hard to pick fault in this area.
       
      This is accompanied by some excellent resolution of detail, making it very easy to separate the different lines within a multi-layered piece of music. As usual, stereo imaging follows where detail leads, and although we have heard just a shade more image depth (from amps costing considerably more than a grand, mind you) we have hardly heard better imaging stability.
       
      In a well-recorded oratorio recording, for instance, we found the placement of the voices absolutely consistent irrespective of the accompaniment behind them. An excellent result.
      By this point, you're probably waiting for the big 'but'. Frankly, there isn't one."
       
      Not only does this amp sound refined, musical and powerful, it is just so adaptable and convenient.
       
      Full remote control, which even controls switching between speaker a and speaker b. 
       
      Minijack for portable music players and headphone socket on the front of the amp.
       
      TWO tape inputs/outputs.
       
      For when you can never have enough power: TWO pre outputs, one with a level control to allow exact matching with an external power amp, if you want to bi amp! (see my other ad for the matching NAD power amp!!!)
       
      The amp can be bridged if you really need 500 watts or so of output, in the company of a matching 275 power amp similarly connected!
       
      ALSO INCLUDED in the price is the PP375 phono module and the MDC DAC USB Digital Analogue Converter.
       
      Every other sale of this amp on StereoNET in the past generally is missing these optional extras, but you get them here, which just ups the convenience. You don't need extra cables, interconnects, power supplies etc - everything is built in so this amp can also be the musical hub of a really high quality setup. Just plug in your streamer or turntable, put some suitably revealing and high quality speakers on these amps, sit back and try wiping the grin off your face.
       
      Comes with the manual, box, remote, original crap jumpers, some reasonable cable jumpers (which I dont use as they dont do the amp justice).
       
      This amp will drive just about any speakers you can throw at it, and do so while playing music in a gloriously large fashion. If this amp isnt enough for you, add the matching C275BEE power amp for an incredibly powerful and musical combination... I'm sure I can do a special price for anyone who buys both!
       
      One final note - I suspect some early production run of this amp was not up to the usual NAD build standard and there were some reliability issues. I haven't had any problems at all, so I suspect my amplifier is from a later production run. I've played this amp at all volumes, left it on continuously (its better for the amp as you're not constantly surging power into the amp on startup and temperature remains stable), and basically enjoyed the hell out of it, and it hasn't skipped a beat, shut down, gone into soft clipping mode, or done anything but play music reliably. I've had book shelf speakers, different floorstanders on it and my Monitor Audio PL300ii speakers, single speaker cables, bi-wired etc, and never an issue.
       
      I prefer pickup - but can send by courier if you are really keen
       
      Photos: Advertisements without photos of the actual item will not be approved.


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