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"For an electric car, which would help the brand comply with tightening environmental regulations, Porsche is targeting a range of more 500 kilometers (310 miles) before needing to recharge, which shouldn't take longer than a normal stop on a motorway, he said."

 

quite a target there from porsche on their electric car,

 

http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/porsches-tesla-rival-20150316-1m03tj.html

 

but thats whats really needed I think for electric cars to take of in this country…whether porsche's target  is more aspirational…well thats another thing. and am sure will have a price to match. but its good as there will be trickle down and being part of the VW group will get down to even quite budget models eventually e.g. the polo and Up ! and such one day...

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Easy to claim but I'd like to see Porsche produce it at an affordable cost. I don't think that people need instant charging for EVs to become mainstream. What's needed is extensive home and workplace charging infrastructure. Long trips require a realistic range of 400-600kms and a realistic recharge period. Most long trips are punctuated with fuel, food and toilet breaks, as long as recharge can occur within 20 minutes that provides sufficient time without a noticeable delay.

Elon Musk claims that people approach him regularly with new battery designs that come with amazing claims of performance, durability and recharge performance. When he asks to see a working commercial sample he never hears from them again. He says that Tesla could easily produce batteries with greater range but that they wouldn't be affordable. I think that Tesla has quite a lead over traditional cr companies in this area.

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from this article electric cars are very much a different proposition overseas....charging infrastructure, the cars available....and the price you can buy it at...

 

http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/government-policy-putting-the-brakes-on-electric-cars-renault-20150702-gi2t1x.html

 

not great outlook here by comparison...

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from this article electric cars are very much a different proposition overseas....charging infrastructure, the cars available....and the price you can buy it at...

 

http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/government-policy-putting-the-brakes-on-electric-cars-renault-20150702-gi2t1x.html

 

not great outlook here by comparison...

Do you reckon that we should subsidise half the cost of electric cars as in France? An interesting policy topic.

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They have their own industry to subsidise eg the home made Renault ...

... We have nothing of the sort ... So would've subsidising a foreign owned company for half their product cost. Not sure how well that will go down ... As with the very different power source we have here vs Europe as mentioned in the article. It does bring up some good points. ReAlity is we aren't here locally anywhere like overseas when cones to electric cars ...

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Posting the contents of an article from Drive .com - http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/government-policy-putting-the-brakes-on-electric-cars-renault-20150702-gi2t1x.html

Government policy putting the brakes on electric cars: Renault

Renault Australia boss Justin Hocevar has held up the delivery of the Renault Nissan Alliance's 250,000th electric car as evidence the Australian government has the wrong approach to motoring.

The partnership sold the landmark car, a Renault Zoe hatch, to French resident Yves Nivelle, who took advantage of a €10,000 ($14,500) subsidy to buy a €21,990 ($31,885) car for little more than half its retail price.

"The government's environmental bonus was a big factor in my decision to get an EV," Nivelle says.

The French subsidy encourages drivers to trade in older diesel models for a new electric car.

For customers who aren't prepare to pay cash for the car, other French subsidies allow drivers to lease an electric Renault for just €99 ($145) per month.

Australian drivers miss out on the Renault Zoe as tawdry charging infrastructure and a lack of rebates provide little incentive for people to choose electric cars.

"The lack of support for electric vehicles certainly impacts the business plan for Renault to introduce electric vehicles to Australia," Hocevar says.

"Currently electric vehicles in Australia carry a price premium over their internal combustion engine counterparts and in such a competitive and price sensitive market; this does make it difficult for us to look at introducing product."

Asked whether the Federal Government would consider subsidising electric cars, a spokesman for Ian Macfarlane, Minister for Industry and Science, says the main encouragement for people to consider green cars lay in the Green Vehicle Guide website that helps consumers compare cars "based on greenhouse and air pollution emissions".

The government also charges less in luxury car tax to prestige vehicles that use less than 7.0L/100km, however that threshold (set at $75,375) hasn't changed in four years.

Minister MacFarlane is on the record as saying electric cars are "an idea, not a solution", and that he is more interested in hydrogen-fuelled cars than machines that primarily use coal-sourced electricity.

That's not a notion supported in Norway, where government subsidises have pushed electric car sales to around one in five of all models. More than 50,000 electric cars are on the road in Norway, where battery-powered motorists benefit from reduced taxes, toll-free use of motorways, free parking and the use of public transport lanes.

Hocevar says "it would be fantastic if we could emulate this support in Australia", but "at this stage we don't believe there is a plan for the government to introduce support in the near future".

"The lack of support for electric vehicles in Australia is disappointing," he says.

The difference between Australia and Norway is that the majority of local power comes from coal, whereas the Scandinavian nation relies on hydroelectric energy. Yet plenty of other federal, state and local governments around the globe provide strong incentives for green cars, and Hocevar isn't the only Australian executive to criticise the government's approach to electric machines.

BMW Australia boss Marc Heinrich-Werner is on the record as saying the government shows "a complete lack of interest as far as e-mobility is concerned", while Nissan chief executive Richard Emery made headlines in April for a strident critique of government policy surrounding what he described as a frustrating "lack of understanding" surrounding the success of electric cars.

"The two barriers to its local acceptance are the same two it has faced everywhere else in the world, and they aren't marketing or so-called 'range anxiety': they are the lack of publicly available battery recharging infrastructure and the absence of government-driven incentives for consumers to buy a zero-emissions car," he says.

"These two facilities are behind the success of electric vehicles in Europe, the USA and Japan. And we need them here."

While Nissan and the Federal Government are likely at odds over who is responsible for implementing changes that could encourage people to buy electric cars, a spokesman for MacFarlane's department says a study commissioned by the government arrived at a similar conclusion to the car company in that "electric vehicles have a number of advantages over conventional vehicles that can be realised if their upfront cost continues to come down and infrastructure challenges can be overcome".

Edited by Full Range

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Do you reckon that we should subsidise half the cost of electric cars as in France? An interesting policy topic.

 

We Adelaidites are waiting for more info on a proposed plan to build an Electric Car

(near present GMH Factory in Elizabeth).

 

They will need Gov Financial Assist naturally !

(very sketchy plans so far, but was told an overseas manuf can/will supply Floorpans)

Can only hope that local content is as large as practically possible.

 

Totally different planned sales, based on TESLA, having Offices in Shopping Centers all over Aust.

 

3 body types envisaged, Sedan, SUV, & ?????(Ute, Van etc)

 

ElectrifiedJeffers

Edited by jeffl

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I hear that we are in the advanced stages of product development and will soon release a new environmentally friendly and locally produced vehicle. Here is a picture of the current prototype.

 

26dc24d3baed48fc1e266bbbc61e1994.jpg

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They have their own industry to subsidise eg the home made Renault ...

... We have nothing of the sort ... So would've subsidising a foreign owned company for half their product cost. Not sure how well that will go down ... As with the very different power source we have here vs Europe as mentioned in the article. It does bring up some good points. ReAlity is we aren't here locally anywhere like overseas when cones to electric cars ...

 

Good points.

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We Adelaidites are waiting for more info on a proposed plan to build an Electric Car

(near present GMH Factory in Elizabeth).

 

They will need Gov Financial Assist naturally !

(very sketchy plans so far, but was told an overseas manuf can/will supply Floorpans)

Can only hope that local content is as large as practically possible.

 

Totally different planned sales, based on TESLA, having Offices in Shopping Centers all over Aust.

 

3 body types envisaged, Sedan, SUV, & ?????(Ute, Van etc)

 

ElectrifiedJeffers

 

I sure as hell that comes off…this is the kind of thing ideal for australian car building…niche low volume and possibly good profit margin. not always an easy proposition though…as posted fiat was loosing 1/2 the cost of a electric fiat 500 for everyone sold so even big companies can struggle to make a go at it ...

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Looks like just the thing for Tony and co. Meanwhile Tesla continues to roll out its recharging station network...

I hear that we are in the advanced stages of product development and will soon release a new environmentally friendly and locally produced vehicle. Here is a picture of the current prototype.

 

26dc24d3baed48fc1e266bbbc61e1994.jpg

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Its always easy to come up with reasons to sit on your arse and do nothing.

So, what is the problem that needs to be solved?

1. People and goods need to get from A to B

2. CO2 emissions from cars, microfines from diesels, and air pollution of all sorts from coal powered power stations impact on the air we breathe and the way that heat is retained in our atmosphere and oceans.

Barriers to change

1. People like doing things they have always done. Only about 10% of journeys are on public transport. Their days - jobs, child care, shopping , recreation, where they live etc. are designed around private transport.

2. Apart from your house your car is your second biggest status symbol. A big truck says f you, i made it, don't mess with me. Its what " everyone" aspires to. Yes, some inner city kids are rejecting this, but once you have kids you need a hummvee to carry the nappys.

3. People don't like being told what to do. They do like solar oanels however as it allows them to say f you to the man who sends them a power bill.

4. Everyone has a budget. Any change is likely to be costly initially- new infrastructure, new cars, new non- car options,

5. The liberal national government are fundmentally opposed to anything green unless there is a tourist dollar to be made or if it is offshore, like whales. Tony is more likely to ban EVs than support them.

6. Electric cars are not a viable plug and play solution just yet. Batteries are expensive and there isn't a swap station or supercharger at Bunnings.....yet. Electric engines are cheap, are brilliantly efficient, reliable, have great longevity and crap on petrol engines in NHV, simplicity, torque cuves, sound emissions, pollution from the vehicle. They are basically brilliant. Feeding them juice harder, lets call it a work in progress.

7. Australia does not have anything to sell, or particularly to export. The ..............individuals in corporate land do not stand to make a killing out of the transition to something like EVs or at least they are already making a killing out of the status quo.

So, the solution is unlikely to be a simple one.

Our only hope is a disruptive business model that flys under the radar long enough for it to get entrenched before the big end of town sees it coming. Roof top solar is an example of this. Once affordable

batteries start hitting the market its gonna get ugly i reckon. There is alot of capacity on our roofs right now and alot of it is in the poorer suburbs as well.

Just maybe the electric car might become more affordable with the right range and with the right image at the right time. Add an oil supply problem and you are half way there.

I don't think government is gonna help however, not unless the writing is on the wall. Government backs the status quo regardless of how unsustainable it is, until it has no choice.

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Our only hope is a disruptive business model that flys under the radar long enough for it to get entrenched before the big end of town sees it coming. Roof top solar is an example of this. Once affordable 

batteries start hitting the market its gonna get ugly i reckon. There is alot of capacity on our roofs right now and alot of it is in the poorer suburbs as well.

 

http://www.teslamotors.com/en_AU/powerwall

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The Tesla car business model is disruptive through the market segments that it is targeting. Although its worldwide sales will only reach 50,000 this year, it's targeting the prestige high margin end of the market and stealing big profits from the German manufacturers in particular. Not only is the Model S as good and arguably better, its also cheaper than German equivalents. Audi A6/8, Panamera and BMW 5/7 sales have taken a hit in the USA because of this. The Germans are not ignoring this and are about to release BEVs of their own. This will shift the perception of BEVs from cheap and glorified golf carts towards something desirable. Then the Tesla III will arrive at US$30,000 and if Tesla can successfully scale they will be eagerly desired. Tesla are already the only auto manufacturer with no advertising budget, the cars will sell themselves. This is a much more disruptive strategy than starting at the budget end of the market where they will never succeed in establishing themselves against the experienced big players who can afford to price them out of the market.

Tesla will do the same with stationary batteries, start at the top end of the market but offer a compelling price/performance ratio product.

 

This is a business strategy that Australian manufacturers of all products just don't grasp and persist in chasing the bottom end of the market where local manufacturers can't compete. If only Blade had converted BMWs instead of Diahatsus they might still be in business. If only the COAL-ition in all their coal loving glory could see a predominantly EV fleet as a national security issue (giving us more oil independence) rather than just through a green technology hating lens then we might get some real incentives to encourage change and have similar results to Norway.

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