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Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil (Music Matters 33rpm)

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Ahmed Abdullah & The Solomonic Quintet 

Featuring Charles Moffett

 

Ahmed Abdullah  trumpet, fluegelhorn, voice
David S. Ware  tenor saxophone, stritch
Masuhjaa  el. guitar
Fred Hopkins  bass
Charles Moffett  drums

 

 

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I downloaded and burnt this wonderful album to disc.

 

Liner Notes

First impressions of Ahmed Abdullah's Solomonic Quintet: the deftly shifting rhythms of the dance, the soulful inflection of the song, and, always, clarity and balance. At first it was the Solomonic Quartet – trumpet, tenor, bass and drums, a drier, more brittle sound. But the essentials were there. Charles Moffett's crisply articulated drumming, soft shoe pitter-pat circling in a ring dance inside your head, pivoting on the earth-bow throb of Fred Hopkins' bass. Ahmed Abdullah's trumpet, the clean bright call of shining brass echoing the proud lineage of Lee Morgan, Clifford Brown, Fats Navarro, but singing of today. The gruffer linearity of the tenor, played by Chico Freeman at those early gigs, then the passionate but deliberately paced talespinning of David S. Ware. A band chanting the ancient wisdom of African diaspora with the immediacy of today's media-saturated, computer-linked global dialogue.
If you hear the horns as voices, and the bass and drums as impulse and motion, then Masujaa's electric guitar is the spark that jumps from synapse to synapse, resonating the voices and the motive rhythms, facilitating dialogue and dance. It's the most recent addition to a music that's been germinating awhile now, and it has brought further clarification, a sense that each element has found its proper place. The music of the Solomonic Quintet is still volatile, still ripe with discovery, but there is also a sense of setting, a certain hard-won sufficiency. The musicians and the music sing as one voice now. One voice with many stories to tell, many points of view.
Each of these musicians has tempered his training and inclinations and God-given talent in working situations where one is consistently called on to play at or beyond one's peak capacity, where the impulse to transcend becomes internalized, if not routine. Ahmed Abdullah's trumpet has been heard in big bands and small groups led by some of the most celebrated and discerning composer-players on the New York scene. Most recently, he has been a motivating force in The Group, a cooperative unit that also includes Marion Brown, Sirone and Andrew Cyrille. But he has been heard to best advantage with his own bands, which have consistently been characterized by balance, directness, and sense of purpose; the present Solomonic Quintet brings his gifts as a composer and improviser into even sharper focus.
David Ware, playing both tenor and stritch in this context, is a former member of the ensembles of Andrew Cyrille, Milford Graves and Cecil Taylor. Masujaa, notable for the breadth of his musical interest, recorded with Ahmed Abdullah in the early 70s on a section of Douglas Records' Wildflower Series. He has recorded more recently with Ronald Shannon Jackson's The Decoding Society, and currently plays with his own group, X Factor. Fred Hopkins has appeared on more than 60 recordings, always bringing warmth and wit to a unique style of playing bass, which is both percussive and richly melodic. This, delivered with an extraordinary exactness of timing, can be heard to great advantage here on El Canto.
Charles Moffett grew to musical maturity in Fort Worth, Texas, where he played in teenage bands alongside future giants such as Ornette Coleman, Dewey Redman, and Prince Lasha. Some years later, he helped Coleman and bassist David Izenson redefine the most basic notions of group playing, in a trio documented most enduringly on the two Blue Note LP's "Live at the Golden Circle," recorded in Stockholm. Any account of his subsequent contributions would have to include the raising of a very musical family that includes his son Charnett, now a recording artist in his own right. Charles Moffett is the creator of a unique approach to polyrhythmic percussion, combining dexterity, precision, and heart. Each part of the drum kit has its own role to play in a shifting, mercurial, light-handed, sure-footed dialogue of rhythms. At the same time, all the parts cohere, so that Moffett's drumming speaks with brisk, sharply-defined authority.
The Solomonic Quintet manages to be more than the sum of its very considerable parts, and that in itself is no small achievement. But the most impressive thing about this music is the way it feels. The depth-of-field you find in the blues is wedded to the improvisational freedoms of jazz and the plainspeaking-but-highstepping immediacy of African and Caribbean rhythms and song forms, all without a hint or artifice or strain. The music is sinewy, substantial, easy to listen to and hard to forget. It satisfies on every level, and that is rare indeed.


Robert Palmer

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Masabumi Kikuchi: Wishes/Kochi

Like a Japanese mix of ******* Brew and Dark Magus (including some of Miles Davis' mid-70's personnel) with Terumasa Hino on trumpet sounding much like Davis himself.

A-list Kozmigroove, and very highly recommended.

 

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Whole album can be heard on Youtube here, but don't be put off by the first three and a half minutes that sounds like traditional Japanese music. :) :

 

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I haven't been playing records much lately for various reasons, but have bit of time home alone this afternoon so I thought I would (literally) dust off the turntable and spin some jazz.

Paul Bley - Ramblin' (1966 - LP)

Trio with Mark Levinson on bass and Barry Altschu on drums. The record is a little noisy - needs a better clean - but the music is spacious and soothing.

post-129330-0-71281300-1454556953_thumb.

Edited by Monty

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Basement Sessions-vol 3: The Ljubljana Tapes

CD

Part of an order I received today from Squidco, although this is a Clean Feed release. Recorded live at 54th Ljubljana Jazz Festival before the public concert in July 2013.

 

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A blurb about it:

 

At the third volume of its “Basement Sessionsâ€, the Jonas Kullhammar / Torbjorn Zetterberg / Espen Aalberg trio brings a fourth element to the “mutated hardbop†concept they’ve been putting to practice: Jørgen Mathisen. The Norwegian tenor saxophonist is the perfect match to Kullhammar’s twin sax – he has a similar power drive and the same connection to the tenor jazz tradition (the one going through Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane) than the Swedish musician. Finding them together in this live recording at a very special session before the audience got in, for their appearance at the Ljubljana Jazz Festival is a joy for the ears. Side by side they improvise inside (and out) everyone’s compositions (plus a surprising rendition to Marilyn Mazur’s Fresk Baglæns) and topping one of the most propulsive rhythmic sections in Europe today, provided by the always surprising Zetterberg and Aalberg. If you thought, by listening to Mathisen’s work with Shagma, The Core and Zanussi Five, he was a Kullhammar’s rival in the Scandinavian scene, think again: here they are in a collaborative set, never indulging in a “who blows more and play faster†combat. The music sounds old school, mixing references of the years when hardbop transitioned to free jazz, but make sure: what you find here isn’t a passive reproduction of the Fifties. 

Edited by soundfan

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@@soundfan, a very worthy recommendation.

 

Pity my cover has a 14cm crease in it :(

 

Sorry to hear that. Are you going to seek a replacement? IIRC mine was packed pretty well, and fortunately arrived in great nick.

Edited by soundfan

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Masabumi Kikuchi: Wishes/Kochi

Like a Japanese mix of ******* Brew and Dark Magus (including some of Miles Davis' mid-70's personnel) with Terumasa Hino on trumpet sounding much like Davis himself.

A-list Kozmigroove, and very highly recommended.

 

R-3583068-1337475882-4831.jpeg.jpg

 

Whole album can be heard on Youtube here, but don't be put off by the first three and a half minutes that sounds like traditional Japanese music. :) :

 

i freakin' need this!!

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Sorry to hear that. Are you going to seek a replacement? IIRC mine was packed pretty well, and fortunately arrived in great nick.

 

Yes, will get it replaced. The rest of the LPs and both inner and outer packaging had no damage, so it must have been packed that way.

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600x600-182.jpg

 

One of the very best jazz albums I have heard released in the last couple of years, and a great way to get the day underway.

 

Clean Feed are having a super sale at the moment and this album can be had for $7 US.

 

https://cleanfeed-records.com/?product_cat=%3F%28superstockoff%29%2C%28stockoff%29&mc_cid=65f693bbfe&mc_eid=642f4ff3bf

Edited by soundfan

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I read about this album on a jazz bog, and am listening to it now through Spotify.  It's very good, and I see that vinyl reissues are available on discogs. Tempted.

 

Joe Haider: piano/fender rhodes

Isla Eckinger: bass

Allen Blairman: drums

 

1973

 

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EDIT: Purchased a vinyl reissue.  :)

Edited by soundfan

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600x600-182.jpg

 

One of the very best jazz albums I have heard released in the last couple of years, and a great way to get the day underway.

 

Clean Feed are having a super sale at the moment and this album can be had for $7 US.

 

https://cleanfeed-records.com/?product_cat=%3F%28superstockoff%29%2C%28stockoff%29&mc_cid=65f693bbfe&mc_eid=642f4ff3bf

 

I'm guessing these are CDs, and not downloads or LPs, as there's no indication of format that I can see anyhow?

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I'm guessing these are CDs, and not downloads or LPs, as there's no indication of format that I can see anyhow?

Yeah, the sale items are CD's. Don't let the format put you off though, a ton of great jazz these days only gets a CD or download release.

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Yeah, the sale items are CD's. Don't let the format put you off though, a ton of great jazz these days only gets a CD or download release.

 

I know, unfortunately! ;)

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Satoko Fujii Sextet: Past Life

Another cracking album from Fujii and co.Her husband Natsuki Tamura is once again on board, on trumpet and percussion.

post-103759-0-24682500-1454664359_thumb.

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Guest Misterioso

Myra Melford - Life Carries Me This Way (2013, CD)

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Carl Riseley - the whole The Rise Album. esp This Guys in Love.

 

If you havent listened, do. 

 

If you dont know his background, listen then listen before you look it up, like i did. 

 

Appreciate any other tips on similar quality.

Edited by JPete9

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Guest Misterioso

Satoko Fujii Sextet: Past Life

 

Inspired by this:

 

Satoko Fujii / Myra Melford - Under The Water (2009, CD, 386/500)

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Kohsuke Mine Quintet: Daguri

 

Another brilliant album, all killer no filler, found via a jazz blog. Pity is, there (to my knowledge) has only ever been the one release of this album, and that was on vinyl. Pity that prices start at $150 on discogs.

 

Album can be heard in full here:https://youtu.be/F_f6QQncSH8

 

Or download an MP3 version here: Click on the link.  http://www.mediafire.com/?3rrpk0z5ve8kr85

 

Kosuke+Mine+-+Daguri+A.jpg

Edited by soundfan

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