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Briz Vegas

Tesla Model S

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If you had $70k US for a new sedan why wouldn't you buy one?

- best crash test of any road car ever tested in the US

- 250 mile range, as tested by an auto magazine, not government figures

- less than $10 dollars to fill up

- Jeremy Clarkson won't test it.

- rides and handles well

- faster than an M5 in a drag race

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vvHTN0Yi1t4&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DvvHTN0Yi1t4

- super quiet

- sells better the equivalent sized BMW and Merc in US

The only doubt would be the batteries cost of replacement at the end of their life, but I'm sure that's answered somewhere on the web. I know they have shown a battery swap in 1/2 the time it takes to fill a conventional car.

So the only thing to hate.......is their product release events. They are so Apple you want to puke, and I have Apple stuff.

I think there are interesting times ahead for the automobile.

Edited by Briz Vegas

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I find this car inspiring in the application of new technology in a market that is very slow to change.

If cars were evolving as fast has computers, imagine what would be in your driveway today.

 

Edited by ssgp2

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I would buy one if the recharging infrastructure was in place. 

 

124237-full.jpg

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The exciting additional story with the continued evolution of electric cars is the merger with smart technology in households, implications for energy storage with ongoing development of battery technology and links to renewable energy - a perfect storm of advanced technologies that will change our futures dramatically :-)

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Guest JohnA

do we know what the pricing in Aus is????

 

the only report i have seen is between $100-$200k with a waiting deposit of $40k for the S 

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what is cheaper in Australia?

70 litres of petrol say using 15 litres per 100km

Electricity required to fully charge a Tesla for the equivalent petrol usage at home?

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Guest JohnA

what is cheaper in Australia?

70 litres of petrol say using 15 litres per 100km

Electricity required to fully charge a Tesla for the equivalent petrol usage at home?

 

at the price point of said car, i doubt running costs would be an issue, so doubt the owner would care what it would cost to fully charge or fill with 98 ron  :)

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250 mile range ? That is 400 kms.

 

I suppose it is getting there but is still of little use in this country.

 

According to their website 1 hour of charge gives 3 hours of range. Useless on a road trip that a full size car like this is likely to take.

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The range is something to consider and I would agree that it's not the right car for a road trip.

That being said, how many of you will put more than 400Km in a day , going for work and run errands.

The technology and style is impressive, the performance are better than most sport cars in that price range.

No more oil/air filters change, transmission problems,etc.

I am afraid to ask how much the batteries cost to replace, but by the time you need to, I'm sure the replacement will give more range and a faster recharging time.

 

I think its a great car because it's everything a Prius isn't

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Yes, it had to happen some time and someone had to take the bait when the media made a headline of it.

Each year there are 150,000 car fires in the United States. Tesla has had one.

If you read the companies initial response it seems highly unlikely that Tesla has an issue. Unlike VW they are not running from the incident, in fact they have already contacted the owner and he is keen to get another Tesla. The company says it appears the car performed exactly as it was engineered to perform in this inevitable scenario. The level of engineering is no less than you would expect in an expensive car.

http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/model-s-fire

The Telsa is safer than any car you can buy on the Australian market. It is also inherently much less likely to catch on fire. I think your concerns are misplaced Stumpy.

Edited by Briz Vegas

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So, we are now up to 3 Tesla fires after a big prang. Run of bad luck, too many hoons buying them? I am watching with interest but remain a fanboi for now. The 3 owners were fine all keen to get another.

Other interesting Tesla news........What's wrong with conservative politicians? They hate any change .......unless they are also hoons.

How Tesla electric cars won over N.C. lawmakers

By Julie Bykowicz and Angela Greiling Keane

Bloomberg News

Posted: Thursday, Nov. 28, 2013

WASHINGTON Tesla Motors was in trouble in North Carolina. Prohibited from opening showrooms there, it was on the way to being unable to sell cars at all when the state Senate voted unanimously to block online auto sales.

Then Tesla turned out a lobbying weapon that, in the home state of stock-car racing’s hall of fame, spoke louder than money: It parked a Model S at the Capitol and invited lawmakers and Gov. Pat McCrory to take it for a spin.

“When you accelerate it, it was the same sort of feeling I got when I test-drove a Mustang Boss back when I was probably 23 years old,†Republican House Speaker Thomas Tillis, 53, told the (Raleigh) News & Observer.

So ended the anti-Tesla legislation. Tillis’ chamber never voted on it.

Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk’s strategy of selling his $70,000-and-up electric car directly to customers through the Internet or company galleries has pitted him in at least seven states against franchised dealers who view Tesla’s marketing and sales models as threats to their existence.

Tesla delivered about 5,500 Model S in the third quarter, more than twice as many as it did in all of last year. It said it plans to deliver “slightly under 6,000†this quarter with Musk saying demand exceeds supply. Its sales depend on access to customers, which it reaches through showrooms modeled on those of tech companies.

The fight with dealers isn’t the company’s sole challenge. Tesla also faces a threat in Washington, where its Model S is under U.S. investigation after three battery fires, and three workers were injured Nov. 13 at its only assembly plant in an industrial accident.

At both the state and federal level, the Palo Alto, Calif.-based company is running a risk Microsoft faced in the 1990s, when it found itself in the midst of a government antitrust action without an experienced advocacy team to shepherd it through the system and build allies for the future.

Musk is putting his star power against one of the best connected and most experienced U.S. lobbies, which has outspent Tesla by multitudes in state capitols and often has some of their own serving as legislators.

Dealers spent $86.8 million on state election races across the U.S. between 2003, when Musk created Tesla, and last year, according to the National Institute on Money in State Politics, a nonprofit in Helena, Mont. They’ve also pumped $53.7 million into federal campaigns, the Center for Responsive Politics found.

Tesla’s investment in state and federal politics was less than $500,000, those same sources show.

“The challenge we face, of course, is that the auto dealers are very strong and very influential at the state level, among the legislatures,†Musk told shareholders in June. Dealers, he said, are “making it harder to get things done.â€

.

Outside of N.C.

New York’s Assembly this year scrapped a bill that would’ve stopped Tesla sales in that state. Virginia granted Tesla one showroom license after initially turning it down amid threats from auto dealers to sue.

The showmanship that worked in North Carolina failed in Texas, where dealers spent nine times more than the company on 2012 elections and lobbying. Employees at Tesla’s Texas galleries can’t sell cars, offer test drives or discuss prices after legislation to repeal those restrictions failed to come to votes this year.

“The only people who are opposed to Tesla are the dealers,†said Massachusetts state Rep. David Linsky, a Democrat whose district includes the company’s only gallery in the state. “Every legislator has auto dealers in their district, and they’re out in force.â€

Tesla’s strategy hinges on its sales model, said Colin Rusch, a senior analyst with Northland Capital Markets.

“They have direct control over their brand and their consumer relationships,†said Rusch, who’s based in New York and rates Tesla shares “buy.†“They’re able to put their products in the best light and there aren’t competing interests.â€

Dealers counter their model is better for consumers, by giving them a consistent place to go for service, and for automakers, by taking sales costs off their balance sheets.

“With factory-owned stores, if the factory goes out of business, so does the store,†said Tim Jackson, chief executive officer of the Colorado Auto Dealers Association, citing the examples of General Motors Co. brands that ended when the company was restructured in bankruptcy.

“If and when Tesla falls on hard times and shuts down, all of the service centers shut down at the same time because they are all factory-owned,†he said.

Battling bills, dealers

In North Carolina, the anti-Tesla bill was sponsored by Sen. Tom Apodaca, a Hendersonville Republican and one of three lawmakers to receive the North Carolina Automobile Dealers Association top gift of $8,000 in 2012. That year, the group spent $152,000 in campaign contributions, mostly to Republicans who control both chambers of the legislature, campaign records show.

On March 14, Apodaca filed legislation to block all automakers from selling cars over the Internet. The bill sailed through committee hearings and hit the Senate floor May 13, where it passed unanimously.

Within a week, Tesla added three North Carolina lobbyists, including former Raleigh Mayor Tom Fetzer, the state Republican chairman in 2010 when the party for the first time in 100 years won control of both chambers of the state house.

The company loaned a car to Leilani Munter, a self-described “vegetarian hippie chick†who races cars on developmental circuits for the Nascar and IndyCar leagues.

She wrote a Huffington Post essay May 23 calling the state’s legislation an encroachment “on the fundamental right of every American to choose what they want to drive,†and talked up Tesla to lawmakers during a capitol visit.

The Model S, recipient of this year’s highest performance ratings from Consumer Reports and top crash-test scores from U.S. regulators, then took the starring role.

Tillis, another recipient of an $8,000 check from the dealers, gave the Model S a solid review, as did Rep. Tim Moore, R, who described himself in an interview as “a car guy.â€

“There were people here who didn’t even know there was such a vehicle as this,†Moore said.

His colleagues didn’t act on the Senate bill because “we just realized we needed to have more of a conversation about what was best for consumers,†he said.

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