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Angkor Wat - Cambodia

We had some good thunderstorms during the week.

damselfly hitching a ride on a turtle - I thought it was a radio-tracking antenna at first!       cheers   mick

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i looked for moon tonight.. but was well hid behind the clouds. just peaking out now... but far too high and small now :(

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Two classic looking builds a did a few years back. As a kid I was called "The Mad Scientist", not much has changed. I still have both really beautiful sounding amps. An 807 (Luciano) and a 300B (The Silver Dragon) giant killer.

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i looked for moon tonight.. but was well hid behind the clouds. just peaking out now... but far too high and small now :(

 

Was perfect in outback WA! Camera back in Perth though... :rolleyes:

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Was perfect in outback WA! Camera back in Perth though... :rolleyes:

Well that's bit much use ! We want outback shots :)

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I've been busy with the camera of late...

 

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That's my take on the "supermoon"

 

This is a Eastern Great Egret:

 

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the image has had some heavy cloning done to remove really bad branches and crap and has been cropped too.  I had a split second to get this shot, with lots of trees in the way to muck with AF.  And since it was a reflex shot, my exposure wasn't set up for it, so I had to rescue the raw...still, the final image is OK I think.

 

A Willie wagtail:

 

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And a Black shouldered Kite:

 

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cropped, and I've had to do some cloning work for those dreaded branches...still, quite happy with this shot.  Exposure compensation was +1 stop, but that still wasn't enough to properly expose the bird imho.  f5, 1/3200, ISO 500, handheld 300mm F4 IS and 60D.

Edited by valvelover
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very nice valvelover,

 

even though winter, we visited our favourite gardens in the hills today and came across a few things to photograph along the way :)

 

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its amazing how quickly the light changes there, just within even an hour...

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shall pop back there come early spring am sure :)

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Nice pics al & valve.

I really like the moon.

I love photographing birds but don't do it very often. Here are a few from the mornington peninsula

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Edited by buddyev
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lovely shots of the birds buddy, caught them well. not somethign ever tried. maybe should give a shot sometime :)

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lovely shots of the birds buddy, caught them well. not somethign ever tried. maybe should give a shot sometime :)

 

yes do so!  it's very relaxing.  I'm spoilt - in my little secret resort, I have at least one Nankeen Kestrel, and 2 BSKs breeding, and spotted a larger Whistling Kite on Wednesday arvo.  3 raptor species in less than 300m is damn well awesome.  

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I'm not a serious bird photographer at all, but it is fun now and again.

Haven't tried with my olympus yet but looking forward to it.

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Al, I reckon seagulls are a gift to bird photographers. No one photographs them because they aren't very exotic but they are fantastic flyers and the fact that they are so easy to find means that you can spend really good intense time practising your technique on them without having to chase them around too much.

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Al, I reckon seagulls are a gift to bird photographers. No one photographs them because they aren't very exotic but they are fantastic flyers and the fact that they are so easy to find means that you can spend really good intense time practising your technique on them without having to chase them around too much.

 

Wholly agreed.  

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Wholly agreed.

We can't all have raptors in the back yard - wish we did!

I love gannets and I've spent hours on the end of Rye pier on the Mornington peninsula trying to get good diving shots - never really managed it. Last time I was down there a school of dolphins were just of the beach rounding up a school of fish and hundreds of gannets were diving into the water all round them. It was really spectacular and very close - no bloody camera!

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Al, I reckon seagulls are a gift to bird photographers. No one photographs them because they aren't very exotic but they are fantastic flyers and the fact that they are so easy to find means that you can spend really good intense time practising your technique on them without having to chase them around too much.

 

yeah, my 70-200 is maybe a bit short for birding, but should take along wiht me in anycase to practice. we have a park and a little sanctuary short bike ride away, where some seaguls, ibis, and occasionally a pelican or two hang out. could spend a couple of hours there easy I reckon, would be very relaxing indeed :)

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I used to use a 70-300 on my D90 - that's 450 equivalent and that was probably a minimum for birds in flight. A 200mm on full frame will be a little short but you'll be able to crop in tighter afterwards in pp.

Pelicans are great to photograph because they are big and a bit slow and lumbering on the ground but they are wonderful in flight.Getting the eyes sharp and the feathers properly exposed is critical - white feathers can be a bit of a challenge.

I've got a 75-300 on my olympus - 600mm. I'm not expecting great things from it to be honest, but they are bringing out a 300mm prime next year which I will certainly buy and I'm sure it will be excellent.

Edited by buddyev
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I used to use a 70-300 on my D90 - that's 450 equivalent and that was probably a minimum for birds in flight. A 200mm on full frame will be a little short but you'll be able to crop in tighter afterwards in pp.

Pelicans are great to photograph because they are big and a bit slow and lumbering on the ground but they are wonderful in flight.Getting the eyes sharp and the feathers properly exposed is critical - white feathers can be a bit of a challenge.

I've got a 75-300 on my olympus - 600mm. I'm not expecting great things from it to be honest, but they are bringing out a 300mm prime next year which I will certainly buy and I'm sure it will be excellent.

 

yep I walked past the sigma 150-500 in jb hifi of all places the other day and was tempted to see what it was like. reasonably sized and affordably priced to. spearmint I know uses it to good result. maybe if I get seriously into it this kind of photograpy maybe something might check out :)

 

could try my eos m in the mean time too with its aps-c for 1.6x crop. the place close to me even has a "bird hide" close to the lake so I might be able to get pretty close up to those big birds :)

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Those big sigmas are supposed to be pretty good - I've seen some very sharp bird photos from it - it would be fantastic on your 5d. I suppose you'd need a monopod with it - or get to the gym pretty regularly.

I think you'll find it very difficult doing birds in flight with the eos because you need to be on the move all the time following the line of flight - pretty tough without an eye level viewfinder.

Edited by buddyev
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Sigma 150-500 is what I use and I'm happy with it  - you can check out some of my bird photo results on this thread.

 

Cheers

 

mick

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The raptors, Mick? That's a recommendation. And its a reasonable price for such a monster.

Edited by buddyev
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We can't all have raptors in the back yard - wish we did!

I love gannets and I've spent hours on the end of Rye pier on the Mornington peninsula trying to get good diving shots - never really managed it. Last time I was down there a school of dolphins were just of the beach rounding up a school of fish and hundreds of gannets were diving into the water all round them. It was really spectacular and very close - no bloody camera!

 

hahaha I don't have raptors in my backyard.  I wish I did :(

 

yeah, my 70-200 is maybe a bit short for birding, but should take along wiht me in anycase to practice. we have a park and a little sanctuary short bike ride away, where some seaguls, ibis, and occasionally a pelican or two hang out. could spend a couple of hours there easy I reckon, would be very relaxing indeed :)

 

too shot imho.  300mm minimum.  Like with women, longer is better.  Most birds simply won't let you approach close enough for a 200mm to be effective.  For BIF, I'm finding that in most cases, I'm having to crop a fair bit with a 300mm.  200mm will only be worse.  

 

yep I walked past the sigma 150-500 in jb hifi of all places the other day and was tempted to see what it was like. reasonably sized and affordably priced to. spearmint I know uses it to good result. maybe if I get seriously into it this kind of photograpy maybe something might check out :)

 

could try my eos m in the mean time too with its aps-c for 1.6x crop. the place close to me even has a "bird hide" close to the lake so I might be able to get pretty close up to those big birds :)

 

I'm considering the Tamron 150-600 f5-f6.3 - it's getting some cracking reviews.  It's not a pro prime lens killer, but for the price, it's very good.  AF is generally very good, resolution is better than both Sigmas and demonstrably sharper from what I've seen.  In some cases, I've seen the 600mm end as sharp as the Canon 600mm f4 at f8.  It's apparently very sharp up to around 400mm, and then resolution drops off a bit.  With 500mm still being highly usable, and 600 reasonably usable, providing you stop down.  The IS is apparently exceptionally good by all accounts.  The test images that I've seen taken with this lens have convinced me that it's worthwhile, for the price that it's going for ($1200 AUD or thereabouts).  There's a good warranty too, at least in the US - it's 6 years.  Not sure on Australia.  Build quality is OK, not pro lens quality, but what do you expect for its price?  It's not too heavy (1.9kg), which makes it manageable and mostly hand holdable.  

 

Just some food for thought :)  

 

caveat: I don't own one yet.  

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yep I walked past the sigma 150-500 in jb hifi of all places the other day and was tempted to see what it was like. reasonably sized and affordably priced to. spearmint I know uses it to good result. maybe if I get seriously into it this kind of photograpy maybe something might check out :)

 

could try my eos m in the mean time too with its aps-c for 1.6x crop. the place close to me even has a "bird hide" close to the lake so I might be able to get pretty close up to those big birds :)

 

Assuming you have a Nikon setup with 70-200 f/2.8

 

Don't soil your camera bag with a Sigma, get a TC-20E teleconverter for your 70-200 making it a 140-400mm F5.6. It will be faster and sharper than the Sigma.

 

Found this page, some good info on Nikkor lenses for wildlife photography.

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Those big sigmas are supposed to be pretty good - I've seen some very sharp bird photos from it - it would be fantastic on your 5d. I suppose you'd need a monopod with it - or get to the gym pretty regularly.

I think you'll find it very difficult doing birds in flight with the eos because you need to be on the move all the time following the line of flight - pretty tough without an eye level viewfinder.

The bird hide is perfect for resting the camera lens, prob only catch the birds on the ground for starters. Yeah the eos m might be interesting how it goes :)

Assuming you have a Nikon setup with 70-200 f/2.8

 

Don't soil your camera bag with a Sigma, get a TC-20E teleconverter for your 70-200 making it a 140-400mm F5.6. It will be faster and sharper than the Sigma.

 

Found this page, some good info on Nikkor lenses for wildlife photography.

Hi earl, no ..canon setup but yeah the 70-200 f2.8 is also well regarded as the Nikon equivalent. I like the idea of the 2x tele. That way don't have to find a spot to keep another large lens and utilises one already have. Cheaper option too I suspect. Will look in. Yep would be 400mm equiv. plus if used on my aps-c crop eos m it would be 640mm equiv. which is getting plenty for zoom would think :)

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I've been busy with the camera of late...

 

A Willie wagtail:

 

14881728386_6bb452d380_c_d.jpg

 

 

 

I do like this one in several regards, not least being the expression!

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Well that's bit much use ! We want outback shots :)

 

Not outback shots - will have to wait until I fly back to work (and bother to take the camera, of course...). But for now:

 

"Sailing" down at the local park (Jackadder Lake).

 

 

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Assuming you have a Nikon setup with 70-200 f/2.8

 

Don't soil your camera bag with a Sigma, get a TC-20E teleconverter for your 70-200 making it a 140-400mm F5.6. It will be faster and sharper than the Sigma.

 

Found this page, some good info on Nikkor lenses for wildlife photography.

 

ok 2x tele ordered for the canon, thinking that might bring much more versatility across my canon gear :)

 

Those big sigmas are supposed to be pretty good - I've seen some very sharp bird photos from it - it would be fantastic on your 5d. I suppose you'd need a monopod with it - or get to the gym pretty regularly.

I think you'll find it very difficult doing birds in flight with the eos because you need to be on the move all the time following the line of flight - pretty tough without an eye level viewfinder.

 

so what did you use for your bird shots buddy ?

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ok 2x tele ordered for the canon, thinking that might bring much more versatility across my canon gear :)

so what did you use for your bird shots buddy ?

You don't mess around do you, Al!. Where did you order it from? I hadn't thought of a tele converter but its a really good idea and a better option than another big single purpose lens. I reckon you'll have a lot of fun with it. A lot of the serious bird photographers on ausphotography use them to great effect.

I used the Nikon 70-300 on my d90 - which I just sold. Its not ideal for birds but I did get some pretty sharp shots and I don't do enough bird photography to justify better gear.

I've just got the olympus 75-300 - I haven't done much with it apart from a few test shots yet but it seems okay. It's a bit plasticky compared to the better Oly lenses, but its light enough to carry around with me all the time. The Oly 300mm prime due next year I'm sure will be the lens to get.

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You don't mess around do you, Al!. Where did you order it from? I hadn't thought of a tele converter but its a really good idea and a better option than another big single purpose lens. I reckon you'll have a lot of fun with it. A lot of the serious bird photographers on ausphotography use them to great effect.

I used the Nikon 70-300 on my d90 - which I just sold. Its not ideal for birds but I did get some pretty sharp shots and I don't do enough bird photography to justify better gear.

I've just got the olympus 75-300 - I haven't done much with it apart from a few test shots yet but it seems okay. It's a bit plasticky compared to the better Oly lenses, but its light enough to carry around with me all the time. The Oly 300mm prime due next year I'm sure will be the lens to get.

 

hi buddy I ordered from digi direct, local shop and do good local pricing for local stock, where tend to be buying from lately, gets promptly delivered and 2 weeks no questions asked refunds etc, which is all handy. they price match too and even retrospectively as I found out recently when got the 16-35 4L 

 

yeah much cheaper option than another lens and be small enough to slip in the kit I was thinking. plus expands the use of the 70-200 as well am thinking which is great as love that lens :)

 

anyways lets see how goes.

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I do like this one in several regards, not least being the expression!

 

Thanks - it's a slight crop, but beggers can't be choosers.  I'm not keen on the man made "branch" though.  I was lucky, was driving along looking for some good opportunities, spotted this, slowly got out of the car and opened up the back door, turned on the camera and got one shot off before it flew away just a bit further.

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