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Post some pics thread...

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4 hours ago, hired goon said:

 

46471099782_28a3df358f_b.jpg

 

Sunrise at the jetty yesterday morning. Shooting into the sunlight washes out the colour so I went for an old-timey look (inspired by @awty).

 

Nikon D750 camera + Tamron 70-200 lens @ 200mm, f/11, ISO 100, 1/640 sec. 

 

--Geoff

Great shot mr HG - all the right elements - awty should be chuffed!

 

cheers

mick

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Just got home from spending Christmas with the family in WA. I managed to get a few days in photographing some of the sights. 

 

During our wander around Fremantle I was intrigued with the apparent random yellow lines across several of the buildings. When we got to the end and looked back all was revealed.

 

#1

45807972674_ab9e36ee89_b.jpg

 

#2

46479708912_08fef066d0_b.jpg

 

#3 Looking back reveals the image. The mini with the stripes was a bonus :)

46479709282_b4f1995f57_b.jpg

 

Some info from the web:

 

"Stretching from the tip of the Fremantle Town Hall clocktower to the foot of the Roundhouse, odd scraps of yellow have been appearing on the historic buildings of High Street.

The pieces appear jagged, random and become denser towards the Roundhouse — Western Australia's first convict-built prison.

Climb the Roundhouse stairs and the image suddenly snaps into focus."

 

 

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1 hour ago, Spearmint said:

Just got home from spending Christmas with the family in WA. I managed to get a few days in photographing some of the sights. 

 

During our wander around Fremantle I was intrigued with the apparent random yellow lines across several of the buildings. When we got to the end and looked back all was revealed.

 

#1

45807972674_ab9e36ee89_b.jpg

 

#2

46479708912_08fef066d0_b.jpg

 

#3 Looking back reveals the image. The mini with the stripes was a bonus :)

46479709282_b4f1995f57_b.jpg

 

Some info from the web:

 

"Stretching from the tip of the Fremantle Town Hall clocktower to the foot of the Roundhouse, odd scraps of yellow have been appearing on the historic buildings of High Street.

The pieces appear jagged, random and become denser towards the Roundhouse — Western Australia's first convict-built prison.

Climb the Roundhouse stairs and the image suddenly snaps into focus."

 

 

Whats the point of it? Think this is ok in a modern setting, but it annoys me to see in a historical place or in a national park, whats wrong with the way it is?

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15 hours ago, hired goon said:

 

46471099782_28a3df358f_b.jpg

 

Sunrise at the jetty yesterday morning. Shooting into the sunlight washes out the colour so I went for an old-timey look (inspired by @awty).

 

Nikon D750 camera + Tamron 70-200 lens @ 200mm, f/11, ISO 100, 1/640 sec. 

 

--Geoff

Ha! very nice. Been working on my extra "old-timey" camera, still a lot to sort out, but will be able to 14x17 olden day pictures.

Sorry for the water marks, just negative scans.

 

20181231_090414.jpg

20181231_090453.jpg

IMG_20181228_182250.jpg

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51 minutes ago, mwhouston said:

I like the second shot. 

 

Thanks, I would've liked more time to explore the area, hopefully next trip. 

 

 

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On 30/12/2018 at 7:00 PM, hired goon said:

I thought that the didymium filters were for astrophotography to reduce yellow/orange light typically from city light ... so interesting to see it used for a scene with nothing but city light :lol:

 

Without the filter the street lights would be a different colour?

 

--Geoff  

 

Yes.  Sodium lighting. Lots of it used in the CBD. Results in those orange/brown nightime shots you see of the city.

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On 31/12/2018 at 8:20 AM, Spearmint said:

Just got home from spending Christmas with the family in WA. I managed to get a few days in photographing some of the sights. 

 

During our wander around Fremantle I was intrigued with the apparent random yellow lines across several of the buildings. When we got to the end and looked back all was revealed.

 

#1

45807972674_ab9e36ee89_b.jpg

 

#2

46479708912_08fef066d0_b.jpg

 

#3 Looking back reveals the image. The mini with the stripes was a bonus :)

46479709282_b4f1995f57_b.jpg

 

Some info from the web:

 

"Stretching from the tip of the Fremantle Town Hall clocktower to the foot of the Roundhouse, odd scraps of yellow have been appearing on the historic buildings of High Street.

The pieces appear jagged, random and become denser towards the Roundhouse — Western Australia's first convict-built prison.

Climb the Roundhouse stairs and the image suddenly snaps into focus."

 

 

https://www.yarracity.vic.gov.au/news/2018/11/02/3d-pedestrian-crossing

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Posted (edited)
On 31/12/2018 at 9:51 AM, awty said:

Whats the point of it? Think this is ok in a modern setting, but it annoys me to see in a historical place or in a national park, whats wrong with the way it is?

Cue discussion of theories of aesthetics, but my take is that it's about culture, where culture uses the Brian Eno definition of "the extra stuff you do that isn't necessary". Following with the point that the extra stuff has a cost to it and therefore a value placed on it. For example, a cup of tea can be made without a Japanese tea ceremony. That Freo streetscape can be built equally adequately using tilt-up concrete slab construction, which would deliver a completely different aesthetic and cultural effect, and would send a different set of messages about what is valued (such as valuing efficiency and low cost over the play of light and shade, and that providing an urban landscape that is interesting to humans is not important, for whatever reason).

 

That Fremantle streetscape of buildings all of the same type clearly comes together as a unit so the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, and so the neighbourhood buildings are worth preserving together (even though the roads, signage, street lighting and street furniture have changed since the first build). The artwork makes the same point, and adds a layer of "we can have some fun while also making this point." Which leads to the next question, somewhat challenging, which is "what is it about a historical place that says you shouldn't have some fun with it?" One of the purposes of art is to ask challenging questions, and the artwork successfully asks you to look at the streetscape from the point of "fun" as well as of "nice" "beautiful" "historical/ good" etc.

 

Here in Melbourne our State Government has a theory of aesthetics which basically says "f**k you" the further away you travel from the monied part of town.

 

Here is an example from the Western Suburbs. The story goes like this: first find a good example of the urban rail station building style. Note that even though it's a public building, the designers put some nice shoulders and hips into the roofscape, and varied the brickwork for the play of light and shadow, the overall effect is interesting even though there wasn't a lot of scope to introduce the elements that push the "that's interesting" button in the human brain.

 

4873398293_1e919692e4.jpg

 

Curiously, the station was built in 1985, and the look is very similar to the styles of the stations built in the 1920's in the leafy inner-city suburbs, to give a sense of a metro-wide integrated rail network. Culture.

 

Now cue the need to renovate because terrorism, the decisions to remove conductors, and to have inspectors who carry guns but don't meet the qualifications to get into the Police force. The message is that the amenity of the people with guns is more important than other considerations, such as aesthetics. So a box has been added to the station, in a way that takes into account all the shapes, lines and proportions of the original builders and ignores them completely.

 

It reminds me of the Douglas Adams quote:

 

“The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don't.”

 

 

F117_0892.jpg

 

Geelong is much further down the railway line, in the direction away from Spring St. In a recent visit I counted one empty shop for every two occupied shops. Things are pretty bad. As a result the Geelong voter is a swinging voter. The State Government has a regional development campaign to encourage local employment and get money into the local economy, and part of that is to relocate state government agencies. A new building has been built in the middle of the city to house the public servants.

 

The big blue building has been built to a surprisingly similar theory of aesthetics:

 

image.thumb.png.abf67a0bfa05b136cd61dca59e31ff78.png

 

Some would view this building as a Sign of the Future and indeed for its inhabitants the building offers best-in-class sustainability and environmental ratings as well as a lottery system for the workers to get a desk each morning. What about for those people who will never go inside the doors? The building is hard to ignore, and at least one reading has it as being a big blue middle finger pointing up to the sky, saying in effect to the citizens of Geelong, "If you can somehow manage to ignore this and don't vote for us, here's our message to you."

 

In these Victorian examples, it would be quite a challenge for an artist to create something that would ask "can you look as these artifacts from a fun point of view as well?"  Because the "as well" builds on an aesthetically positive integration with the local environment that in these examples simply doesn't exist.

 

(Not my images. Credits to WorkSafe Victoria and RailGeelong.com)

Edited by ThirdDrawerDown

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Posted (edited)

Young Brown Goshawk ignoring an agitated Satin Flycatcher

 

cheers

mick

Edited by mickj1

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17 hours ago, ThirdDrawerDown said:

Cue discussion of theories of aesthetics, but my take is that it's about culture, where culture uses the Brian Eno definition of "the extra stuff you do that isn't necessary". Following with the point that the extra stuff has a cost to it and therefore a value placed on it. For example, a cup of tea can be made without a Japanese tea ceremony. That Freo streetscape can be built equally adequately using tilt-up concrete slab construction, which would deliver a completely different aesthetic and cultural effect, and would send a different set of messages about what is valued (such as valuing efficiency and low cost over the play of light and shade, and that providing an urban landscape that is interesting to humans is not important, for whatever reason).

 

That Fremantle streetscape of buildings all of the same type clearly comes together as a unit so the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, and so the neighbourhood buildings are worth preserving together (even though the roads, signage, street lighting and street furniture have changed since the first build). The artwork makes the same point, and adds a layer of "we can have some fun while also making this point." Which leads to the next question, somewhat challenging, which is "what is it about a historical place that says you shouldn't have some fun with it?" One of the purposes of art is to ask challenging questions, and the artwork successfully asks you to look at the streetscape from the point of "fun" as well as of "nice" "beautiful" "historical/ good" etc.

 

Here in Melbourne our State Government has a theory of aesthetics which basically says "f**k you" the further away you travel from the monied part of town.

 

Here is an example from the Western Suburbs. The story goes like this: first find a good example of the urban rail station building style. Note that even though it's a public building, the designers put some nice shoulders and hips into the roofscape, and varied the brickwork for the play of light and shadow, the overall effect is interesting even though there wasn't a lot of scope to introduce the elements that push the "that's interesting" button in the human brain.

 

4873398293_1e919692e4.jpg

 

Curiously, the station was built in 1985, and the look is very similar to the styles of the stations built in the 1920's in the leafy inner-city suburbs, to give a sense of a metro-wide integrated rail network. Culture.

 

Now cue the need to renovate because terrorism, the decisions to remove conductors, and to have inspectors who carry guns but don't meet the qualifications to get into the Police force. The message is that the amenity of the people with guns is more important than other considerations, such as aesthetics. So a box has been added to the station, in a way that takes into account all the shapes, lines and proportions of the original builders and ignores them completely.

 

It reminds me of the Douglas Adams quote:

 

“The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don't.”

 

 

F117_0892.jpg

 

Geelong is much further down the railway line, in the direction away from Spring St. In a recent visit I counted one empty shop for every two occupied shops. Things are pretty bad. As a result the Geelong voter is a swinging voter. The State Government has a regional development campaign to encourage local employment and get money into the local economy, and part of that is to relocate state government agencies. A new building has been built in the middle of the city to house the public servants.

 

The big blue building has been built to a surprisingly similar theory of aesthetics:

 

image.thumb.png.abf67a0bfa05b136cd61dca59e31ff78.png

 

Some would view this building as a Sign of the Future and indeed for its inhabitants the building offers best-in-class sustainability and environmental ratings as well as a lottery system for the workers to get a desk each morning. What about for those people who will never go inside the doors? The building is hard to ignore, and at least one reading has it as being a big blue middle finger pointing up to the sky, saying in effect to the citizens of Geelong, "If you can somehow manage to ignore this and don't vote for us, here's our message to you."

 

In these Victorian examples, it would be quite a challenge for an artist to create something that would ask "can you look as these artifacts from a fun point of view as well?"  Because the "as well" builds on an aesthetically positive integration with the local environment that in these examples simply doesn't exist.

 

(Not my images. Credits to WorkSafe Victoria and RailGeelong.com)

Ha!, you nearly lost me with the Eno reference but I persevered. Governments need to seriously adjust there criteria in employing who chooses buildings aesthetics.

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Ye olde "fuzzy-wuzzy" picture

14"x17" pinhole negative, contact printed on cotton rag with Vandyke Brown emulsion.

 

Sea Shells.

 

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Posted (edited)

 

E-M1MarkII    OLYMPUS M.17mm F1.2    17mm    f/1.2    1/8000s    ISO 100

pier.jpg

 

E-M1MarkII    OLYMPUS M.40-150mm F2.8    70mm    f/2.8    1/6400s    ISO 200

fishing early morning.jpg

 

E-M1MarkII    OLYMPUS M.40-150mm F2.8    150mm    f/2.8    1/800s    ISO 200

early morning walk.jpg

Edited by soundfan

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Pic received today from my daughter - staying at future in-laws' beach shack.

Good luck to them.  Says it all.

 

Civilised.jpeg

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