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Feel free to add any pics or stories on any cars of interest.

Got a few iphone snaps of Rock n Roll George's beast today. I've seen the car cruising the city since I were a lad, and then lived in West End for 20 years and saw him every other day. Brissy has of course decided to adopt the vehicle as an icon of something or other since the departure of George, and it now lives at the Qld Museum.

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OK--it's not a "random car" exactly; but it sure is "of interest" 'cause it's come to live with me!   2017 Porsche 718 Boxster.   At the dealer's, taking delivery. Notice the grin.

A workmate drove his GT in today. Unrestored and in his possession for around 40 years. Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

The Mornington Car Show on New Years Day was another well attended show. There were so many cars, many were parking in the streets, and adjoining car parks.   Anyway these Auburns looked interesting

Thats a 1982 Ford Falcon XE ESP 351, captured my imagination as a 12 yr old. A good one is very rare now and mildly collectible.

Edited by mondie
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Thats a 1982 Ford Falcon XE ESP 351, captured my imagination as a 12 yr old. A good one is very rare now and mildly collectible.

Always lusted after one and ended up with an FE LTD as a compromise.

I'd have settled for the 4.1 litre variant............no need for the 351.

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this is a car of particular interest,

has been seen acting rather provocatively at various motor shows including Paris and Geneva, enticing grown men to act irrationally and is well known to the IDP ( international dream police )

a warrant has been issued for its immediate arrest and extradition to Australia on charges of sexiness without a helmet

2012-Alfa-Romeo-4C-Front.jpg

Alfa-Romeo-4C-Cherry-Red-Metallic-Concorso-dElegance-Villa-dEste-2012-rear-ns-1024x682.jpg

Alfa-Romeo-4C-Cherry-Red-Metallic-Concorso-dElegance-Villa-dEste-2012-NS-1024x682.jpg

Alfa-Romeo-4C-Concept-front.jpg

it is described as wearing a carbon fibre chassis approximately 4 metres long with a 2.4 metre wheelbase weighing 850k,

last seen carrying a 1750 petrol turbo 4 cylinder engine with a top speed of 250kph and can accelerate away from you in less than 5 seconds

a reward of $60,000 has been issued for this car, anyone who plans capturing one themselves should approach with caution as this car can BITE!!!!

C U O R E heart.png S P O R T I V O

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Thats a 1982 Ford Falcon XE ESP 351, captured my imagination as a 12 yr old. A good one is very rare now and mildly collectible.

Not many left in perth now hardly seen on the road (parked in the garage going up in value)

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More like a Chevy Monza.

To the best of my knowledge, the VB and probably later models were based on the Opel.

Just grabbed this from Wikki

The VB Commodore was loosely based on the 1977 Opel Rekord E bodyshell but with the front grafted on from the Opel Senator to accommodate the larger Holden six-cylinder and V8 engines, giving it a similar appearance to the Opel Commodore. Overall, the body was strengthened substantially to withstand the harsh conditions of the Australian outback. Total cost of development is reported to be over A$110 million

Mr Brock did modify an Opel coupe by fitting a 5 litre and calling it a Monza but it never saw production due to costs to meet ADR's

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TOADRACER

The Mazda Roadpacer was a comedy of errors , but no-one laughed.

roadpacer.jpg

If you took an ill-handling, overweight and out-dated Australian land barge and lumped it with a highly strung rotary motor, you'd have a heinous pile of chrome-bumpered, vinyl-roofed sh1t. You could also call it the Mazda Roadpacer AP.

Back in March 1975, the otherwise innovative Japanese manufacturer got a rush of blood to the head and hopped in bed with The General (GM). The "Toadracer" was their ham-fisted, gimp-like offspring.

The reason behind the get-together was that GM USA wanted information on Mazda's rotary (for the stillborn quad-rotor Corvette), in exchange of which they "donated" a boatload of GM cars. A slab of stale light beer would've been a bettertrade after the damage this car did to Mazda's image.

They saw the "free" family-size body shells as a way to cash in on the burgeoning luxury car scene ruled by V8 behemoths like the Toyota Century and Nissan President and the four-banger Mitsubishi Debonair. It was a good idea poorly executed.

Mazda took a god-awful HJ-series Holden Premier and exchanged the 3.3-litre "Red" straight-six for a 100kW 13B rotary. The purpose was mainly to escape a Japanese engine-capacity tax, a move that turned the car from simply bad into something a sado-masochist wouldn't drive leather-clad.

The problem, apart from woeful dynamics and quality, was that the land-barge HJ tipped the scales at 1575kg, but the frantic rotor only had 187Nm of torque, only available at the noisy end of the rev range.

The 13B was hooked up to a three-speed auto as the target market of diplomats and business fat cats didn't shift their own gears. This compounded the inadequacies of the 1.3-litre motor as the gearbox didn't like high-rpm applications and the twin-rotor only came alive near the right-hand side of the tacho.

People soon worked out the equation that big car plus small, thirsty engine equal expensive running costs, and that the Roadpacer was a shocker. It guzzled as much and sometimes more fuel than the Aussie five litre bent eight.

After all that, the punchline for everyone except Mazda - was the price. The rotary powered Kingswood cost twice what the car maker's top-of-the-tree Cosmo RE LTD luxury sports coupe retailed for, and the Cosmo could outrun a geriatric with two busted hips; the "Toadracer" couldn't.

In the end, it took Mazda two years to sell 800 of the lead-tipped arrows to gullible Japanese big wigs. It was meant to be a quick-fix money spinner; instead, it ended up humiliating Mazda and has become a mythical joke of the Japanese automotive industry.

Edited by Willow
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My brother owns a fairly rare Mazda Eunos Cosmo, twin turbo 3 rotor 20b. Goes like stink, but geez doesn't it chew the petrol!

[stock pic.]

eunoscosmojc.jpg

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One of my all time faves. The Jensen Interceptor. From the original.....

post-109782-0-28765600-1350556050_thumb.

To the one apparently due for launch in 2014...

post-109782-0-04808300-1350556086_thumb.

Back in the day, my ol'man had a Mk III Interceptor and my recollection was of him spending more time under the bonnet than behind the wheel! :P Still a beauty to my eyes.

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One of my all time faves. The Jensen Interceptor. From the original.....

post-109782-0-28765600-1350556050_thumb.

To the one apparently due for launch in 2014...

post-109782-0-04808300-1350556086_thumb.

Back in the day, my ol'man had a Mk III Interceptor and my recollection was of him spending more time under the bonnet than behind the wheel! :P Still a beauty to my eyes.

Sweet, probably my fave car when I were a lad. From memory it was the fastest production car in the world for a time. But according to James May it's a right POS.

The new one should be interesting!

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TOADRACER

The Mazda Roadpacer was a comedy of errors , but no-one laughed.

roadpacer.jpg

If you took an ill-handling, overweight and out-dated Australian land barge and lumped it with a highly strung rotary motor, you'd have a heinous pile of chrome-bumpered, vinyl-roofed sh1t. You could also call it the Mazda Roadpacer AP.

Back in March 1975, the otherwise innovative Japanese manufacturer got a rush of blood to the head and hopped in bed with The General (GM). The "Toadracer" was their ham-fisted, gimp-like offspring.

The reason behind the get-together was that GM USA wanted information on Mazda's rotary (for the stillborn quad-rotor Corvette), in exchange of which they "donated" a boatload of GM cars. A slab of stale light beer would've been a bettertrade after the damage this car did to Mazda's image.

They saw the "free" family-size body shells as a way to cash in on the burgeoning luxury car scene ruled by V8 behemoths like the Toyota Century and Nissan President and the four-banger Mitsubishi Debonair. It was a good idea poorly executed.

Mazda took a god-awful HJ-series Holden Premier and exchanged the 3.3-litre "Red" straight-six for a 100kW 13B rotary. The purpose was mainly to escape a Japanese engine-capacity tax, a move that turned the car from simply bad into something a sado-masochist wouldn't drive leather-clad.

The problem, apart from woeful dynamics and quality, was that the land-barge HJ tipped the scales at 1575kg, but the frantic rotor only had 187Nm of torque, only available at the noisy end of the rev range.

The 13B was hooked up to a three-speed auto as the target market of diplomats and business fat cats didn't shift their own gears. This compounded the inadequacies of the 1.3-litre motor as the gearbox didn't like high-rpm applications and the twin-rotor only came alive near the right-hand side of the tacho.

People soon worked out the equation that big car plus small, thirsty engine equal expensive running costs, and that the Roadpacer was a shocker. It guzzled as much and sometimes more fuel than the Aussie five litre bent eight.

After all that, the punchline for everyone except Mazda - was the price. The rotary powered Kingswood cost twice what the car maker's top-of-the-tree Cosmo RE LTD luxury sports coupe retailed for, and the Cosmo could outrun a geriatric with two busted hips; the "Toadracer" couldn't.

In the end, it took Mazda two years to sell 800 of the lead-tipped arrows to gullible Japanese big wigs. It was meant to be a quick-fix money spinner; instead, it ended up humiliating Mazda and has become a mythical joke of the Japanese automotive industry.

These were a bizzare concoction, I have anarticle in an old Australian Muscle Car mag on these, very few left these days. Slugs too apparently.

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These were a bizzare concoction, I have anarticle in an old Australian Muscle Car mag on these, very few left these days. Slugs too apparently.

Slugs = no torque + lots of weight...Rob

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A friend of mine has an R33 gts-t Skyline. It's around 340kw at the rear wheels. He took me round the track at Sandown at a club day.

We sat up the backside of a Porsche GT3 for 2 laps before deciding to back it off a bit.

Cost so far is $15k for stock import and about the same in mods. Most cars when you work them to this extent become a hand grenade with the pin out, but these Skylines seem to be bulletproof.

Video of a 1000hp one from Japan, as driven by JC on top gear.

http://m.youtube.com/?reload=3&rdm=m6y2kw5xe#/watch?feature=related&v=Yis0KSKsWF4

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Jonkheere-bodied Phantom 1 Rolls Royce - absolutely beautiful. :thumb:

One of he best looking cars I have ever seen. :love It makes MANY OF today's luxury cars look like the bland boxes they really are

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One of he best looking cars I have ever seen. :love It makes MANY OF today's luxury cars look like the bland boxes they really are

Yeah, there's something magic about the 1930's Art Deco aesthetic IMO. I just love the wooden cabin cruisers and speedboats of that era too.

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Yeah, there's something magic about the 1930's Art Deco aesthetic IMO. I just love the wooden cabin cruisers and speedboats of that era too.

We are definitely like minded Tony. Art Deco is my all time favourite style period and the only boats that I like are slow ones that are made from wood.....preferably varnished teak. I remember as a child going with my father and a mate of his who owned a Halvorsen cruiser made of teak wood and it had a real cabin. We would often go cruising,fishing and swimming along the Hawksbury River north of Sydney. :)

Apparently one is best advised not to swim or fish there anymore due to urban development on the foreshores.

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Followed this up the freeway. Sad thing was I had to slow down to 100 to see what it was and it was going so slow I couldn't hear it.

post-110889-135163292307_thumb.jpg

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More like a Chevy Monza.

No surprises that they are all similar.

General Motors Holden.

General Motors Chevrolet.

General Motors Opel.

Cheers, Earle.

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