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Warren M.

What features do I need in an AV receiver for my imminent JTLi Oppo BDP-95 3D and anticipated 3D HD TV?

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I have a complex system based primarily around my music system. I'll try to explain it as it stands and how I want the Oppo to be integrated into it.

Music system:

  • My music system runs off its own tube integrated amp (JTLi KT-88) into my front speakers (Totem Arro) and powered sub (REL T-3).
  • The JTLi-enhanced OPPO BDP-95 will replace my current CD/SACD player for music, with analogue RCA connections to the JTLi KT-88 amplifier (CD input).
  • Various other music sources including phono (records) and tuner (FM radio)
  • The OPPO will be used both as a source of disc-based music and hard-drive-stored music (and eventually cloud-based) music

A/V system (current configuration):

  • Marantz SR-4300 5.1 Receiver
  • 46" Plasma TV, to be replaced some time in the next few months probably
  • Foxtel
  • DVD will be replaced by JTLi OPPO BDP-95, connected via HDMI to the new AV receiver
  • The OPPO will be used both as a source of DVD/Bluray-based video and hard-drive-stored (and eventually cloud-based) video
  • Direct output from AV amp to centre and rear speakers
  • Front output (with bass component) via analogue RCA connections to the JTLi KT-88 amplifier (AV input) to feed front speakers and sub (see music system above)
  • The REL-3 sub facilitates independent connection from the AV receiver (in addition to its connection to the Stereo Amp), but, to date I have not done that. I expect to do that in the new configuration.
  • I may go to 7.1 but I do not expect to go 7.2

My questions are:

Does the AV receiver need to support 3D, in order to pass 3D output from the OPPO through it to the 3D TV?

Are there non-stratospherically-priced receivers out there which allow the front-speaker output to be passed to the amplifier with minimal analogue processing?

What AV receivers out there have the type of flexibility I need for this setup and sufficiently musical sound quality that I will not hate the sound coming through the AV receiver (as distinct from the sound coming through the valve amp)?

Do modestly priced AV receivers allow control via a PC connection (LAN or wireless)?

Cheers

Warren

Edited by warrenmmmmm

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Does the AV receiver need to support 3D, in order to pass 3D output from the OPPO through it to the 3D TV?

Yes.

Are there non-stratospherically-priced receivers out there which allow the front-speaker output to be passed to the amplifier with minimal analogue processing?

No.

What AV receivers out there have the type of flexibility I need for this setup and sufficiently musical sound quality that I will not hate the sound coming through the AV receiver (as distinct from the sound coming through the valve amp)?

Yes but you might want a significant budget. Think Theta, Integra, upper end Denon, Sony or Yamaha.

Do modestly priced AV receivers allow control via a PC connection (LAN or wireless)?

No but Apple TV should do most things that you want/need.

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I would consider separates:

Processor:

http://shop.emotiva....s/products/xmc1

and a 5-ch amp:

http://shop.emotiva....s/products/xpa5

Very interesting. Thanks. Given the size of my listening environment, their modestly priced 80W Per Channel 5-channel amp looks like it is all the power I'll need for my centre and surround speakers. The pre/sound-processor looks like a winner, but it aint released yet!

Edited by warrenmmmmm

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I have a complex system based primarily around my music system. I'll try to explain it as it stands and how I want the Oppo to be integrated into it.

Music system:

  • My music system runs off its own tube integrated amp (JTLi KT-88) into my front speakers (Totem Arro) and powered sub (REL T-3).
  • The JTLi-enhanced OPPO BDP-95 will replace my current CD/SACD player for music, with analogue RCA connections to the JTLi KT-88 amplifier (CD input).
  • Various other music sources including phono (records) and tuner (FM radio)
  • The OPPO will be used both as a source of disc-based music and hard-drive-stored music (and eventually cloud-based) music

A/V system (current configuration):

  • Marantz SR-4300 5.1 Receiver
  • 46" Plasma TV, to be replaced some time in the next few months probably
  • Foxtel
  • DVD will be replaced by JTLi OPPO BDP-95, connected via HDMI to the new AV receiver
  • The OPPO will be used both as a source of DVD/Bluray-based video and hard-drive-stored (and eventually cloud-based) video
  • Direct output from AV amp to centre and rear speakers
  • Front output (with bass component) via analogue RCA connections to the JTLi KT-88 amplifier (AV input) to feed front speakers and sub (see music system above)
  • The REL-3 sub facilitates independent connection from the AV receiver (in addition to its connection to the Stereo Amp), but, to date I have not done that. I expect to do that in the new configuration.
  • I may go to 7.1 but I do not expect to go 7.2

My questions are:

Does the AV receiver need to support 3D, in order to pass 3D output from the OPPO through it to the 3D TV?

Are there non-stratospherically-priced receivers out there which allow the front-speaker output to be passed to the amplifier with minimal analogue processing?

What AV receivers out there have the type of flexibility I need for this setup and sufficiently musical sound quality that I will not hate the sound coming through the AV receiver (as distinct from the sound coming through the valve amp)?

Do modestly priced AV receivers allow control via a PC connection (LAN or wireless)?

Cheers

Warren

Hi Warren

What is the difference between the regular Oppo BPD 95 and the JTLi enhanced version?

Regards

Sam

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Hi Warren

What is the difference between the regular Oppo BPD 95 and the JTLi enhanced version?

Regards

Sam

Hi Sam.

There are many internal changes and it is a beast to work with apparently, as it is very complex, packed very tight into its chassis, and even minor mods tend to make it overheat.

The single biggest change that Joe makes to any SACD player or universal player is the incorporation of the "Terra Firma" clock, which aims to eliminate sub-1hz jitter! Sounds like complete horse-feathers doesn't it! The amazing thing is it is real, quantifiable (scientific papers published in the UK) and clearly audible as "digital sound" in double-blind tests. That is one of the mods he has been doing for a few years (even before there was scientific evidence of the nature of the problem), with resulting feedback such as "Whatever Joe comes up with after this [Terra Firma], nothing he will ever do will be as good as this."John Wines, NSW, Australia

In the case of the Oppo 95 there are multiple dependent clocks, so the management of the problem is made vastly more difficult.

Another thing that gets done in the Oppo 95 and other players which use "voltage" output DACs (which he believes to be inherently superior to "current" DACs) is he goes totally passive, using an outstanding transformer and eliminating all transistors and op amps from the output stages. Given the very tight space available in the 95, doing this without overheating requires some pretty clever work.

I'm no electronics engineer, so I really can't throw light on all the other things which get done in the modification. But considering that Joe charged me $200 to upgrade my JLTi KT-88 valve amp from Mk1 to Mk2, including changing from 12AX7 input tubes to 12AT7s (requiring major changes to the circuitry), I can tell you that his modest charges are much lower than the value he adds.

It took Joe over 6 months to find a way through all the issues which were stopping others from modifying the Oppo BDP-95, but he indeed overcame them in late 2011, resulting in a player he describes as "easily the best player I have heard!" - he has worked on SACD players costing many thousands of dollars so that is quite a statement (Joe is really not one for hyperbole and does not tend to sing his own praises, but clearly this is a special exception).

Cheers

Warren.

Edited by warrenmmmmm

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That is one of the mods he has been doing for a few years (even before there was scientific evidence of the nature of the problem), with resulting feedback such as "Whatever Joe comes up with after this [Terra Firma], nothing he will ever do will be as good as this."John Wines, NSW, Australia

Cheers

Warren.

Terra firma clock i had one back in 2008.....

Edited by kajak12

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OK back to the question.

If I understand it, you listen to music 2 ch - via the system set out above - you want to integrate with HT and new TV and have ability to do 3D ( heavens knows why I hate it but each to their own)

IF - you do not listen to 5.1 SCADs or DVD As or if you do occasionally but do not place a high priority on this - then just get a good quality midrange receiver ( a just superseded - Yamaha / Pioneer / Onyko ) around the $2k mark

These are all you will ever need for HT in a situation like yours in my view - they sound fantastic with movies and will drive most sensible speakers to very high levels, they have great bass management and room EQ.

Any money saved spend on the 2ch system or more records

IF - you want high quality 5.1 music via SCAD / DVD A - then that’s going to cost - save an get the best analogue Pre Pro / amp you can afford hook it all up in analogue - do not worry about 3D - just send the video straight to the TV via HDMI

the best bet here is to look second hand some great stuff that was mega bucks comes up cheap as - especially if pre HDMI ( remember with your OPPO it will do all the processing so you do not even need decoding in the pre pro !)

hear is one example of an amp that is for "Audio First"

http://www.rio.com.au/product/0/33/706/audiolab-8000x7-and-8000ap/

For me I would be looking for a second hand Sony 9000 system - see them come up every now and then - you would like them as they are 100% Massively over engineered !!!!

http://www.hometheater.com/content/sony-str-da9000es-av-receiver

Last and most purist - get a quality analogue pre / pro and 3 more valve amps

:)

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If I understand it, you listen to music 2 ch - via the system set out above - you want to integrate with HT and new TV and have ability to do 3D ( heavens knows why I hate it but each to their own)

I never said I liked it - I said I would be going that way - I'm not the only person in my household, and I need to balance what I want against what I can get away with! My family want 3D. I want to keep my family members happy enough that that they don't complain too loudly when I spend a small fortune on hi-fi.

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I never said I liked it - I said I would be going that way - I'm not the only person in my household, and I need to balance what I want against what I can get away with! My family want 3D. I want to keep my family members happy enough that that they don't complain too loudly when I spend a small fortune on hi-fi.

Fair enough.

any way one easy way to get 3D via HDMI and still have a good "analogue" sounding HT Reciever or Pre Pro is ti just connect from OPPO to TV direct and tye analogue out from the Oppo to the reviever, in thins case it need not be the "latest and greatest" . if you use a Logitec remote it easy to keep it simple for all the family to use.

For many ( myself included ) this is not viable as I use many sourses, but in your set up where the OPPO seems the main sourse, all good

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This is indeed a complicated system. When choosing a receiver, I'd look for one with:

1) A good room-eq system such an Audyssey XT32. This is very good for accurate movie audio and good bass.

2) Needs to have pre-outs for connection to your separately amped front speakers.

3) HDMI 1.4 for your 3D.

Someone has mentioned that you can feed one of the Oppo's 3D HDMI outputs directly to your TV. In my experience this has been unreliable i.e. often I'd have EDID/sync issues with the other HDMI feed to my receiver. YMMV. Better to have everything just feed directly to your receiver.

What's your budget and what are you trying to achieve with the PC connection?

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What's your budget and what are you trying to achieve with the PC connection?

My budget - the least I can get away with. Seriously not sure but the Emotiva separates above, once the processor/preamp is released, looks very attractive and probably at my budget point.

The PC connection? I must have been drunk when I wrote that! Any PC connection would be to the Oppo, to connect external music/video sources to it.

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Hi Warren

You could connect the Oppo via optical link directly to your current receiver for audio, and HDMI direct to the TV for video. This should work no need for a new AV Receiver. Leave the rest of your system as is.

http://www.oppodigit...5-Features.aspx

Hope this helps..

Ultimate Convenience:

  • Dual HDMI Outputs – The BDP-95 is equipped with two HDMI output ports and offers the most versatile installation options. You do not have to upgrade your A/V receiver to a 3D model in order to enjoy 3D. One HDMI output of the BDP-95 can be connected to a 3D TV and the other can be connected to a pre-3D HDMI v1.1-v1.3 A/V receiver. For projector users, you can connect one output to a projector for home theater use and the other to a TV for casual viewing. For a multi-room installation the BDP-95 can output audio and video to two 3D or 2D TVs simultaneously.
  • eSATA Port – The BDP-95 features an eSATA interface on its back panel. Customers can take advantage of this fast interface to play contents from external hard drives and enclosures which contain audio, video and photo files.
  • Wireless & Ethernet – Using the included wireless-N adapter or the built-in RJ45 Ethernet port, users will be able to interact with BD-Live content, watch instant streaming programs from provides such as Netflix, Blockbuster etc., playback contents stored on their home network, and keep the BDP-95 up-to-date with firmware release to ensure maximum Blu-ray compatibility.
  • Dual USB Ports - Two USB 2.0 high speed ports are provided, one on the front panel and one on the back. Users can enjoy high definition video, high resolution photos and music directly from their USB drives.
  • PAL/NTSC Conversion - The BDP-95 supports NTSC and PAL systems for both disc playback and video output. It can also convert content of one system for output in another. (Subject to DVD and BD region restrictions.)
  • Back-lit Remote Control - The BDP-95 comes with a fully back-lit remote control for ease of use in dark home theaters. With its ergonomic button layout and clear labeling, operating the Blu-ray Disc player is easier than ever.
  • World Power Supply - The BDP-95 features a world power supply that is compatible with AC power from all regions. Voltage range from 100V-120V and 200V-240V can be selected by flipping a switch on the back panel.
  • External IR - For integration into home theater control systems, the BDP-95 provides external IR IN port to use with an IR distribution system.
  • RS232 Control - For custom installation, the BDP-95 offers an RS232 control port with a rich control and communication protocol. Installers can easily program their favorite control systems to operate the BDP-95.
  • HDMI CEC - HDMI Consumer Electronics Control simplifies the home theater by allowing a single remote control to operate multiple devices.
  • DLNA Certified - Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) Digital Media Player (DMP) compliance enables wired or wireless access of audio, picture, and video files stored on DLNA-compatible digital media servers such as a computer or network storage device (NAS). More details on BDP-95's wiki page.

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Samman is right. By connecting the oppo to the receivet via optical, you just need to set the Oppo to output PCM. The Oppo will then take care of decoding lossless formats.

The only thing to gain from a new receiver is improved usability and marginally better sound quality depending on which receiver/processor you choose to go with.

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I disagree

Hook the Oppo up via analogue 5.1 with 6 interconnects , the 95 has superb DAC and analogue output stages

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