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History of RIAA vs early filesharers


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How new tech can upset the status quo over time :)

 

 

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There's nothing like a knee-jerk reaction that sets things in motion for failure. 

It looks like a major contributor to the RIAA's decline in revenue was the enormous amount of money they wasted in unconsidered legal opinions and trials. 

 

All of this may have had a good side if the RIAA were shown to do what they pretend to do - protect the artists.  However, it appears that their priority has been to protect their own revenues, at the expense of the creatives (eg. later selling-out an artist's reasonable royalty/compensation with the streaming agreements). 

 

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One of the best articles I've read from an artist's point of view was written in 2002 by Janis Ian, a folksinger who started her recording career in the 1950/60's, with considerable success in the 1970's.

She speaks common sense.  The bullet points at the end of the article explaining how the recording contracts control and tie-up an artists career were very revealing. 

 

"The Internet Debacle: An Alternative View"

https://www.janisian.com/reading/internet.php

She also wrote and provides a follow-up article in 2002 to this called  "Fallout: A Follow Up To The Internet Debacle". 

https://www.janisian.com/reading/fallout.php

 

She also provides many intelligent articles on the industry, and helpful advice articles for music performers (I think they should be provided in music schools as required reading, but that's a lay-person's opinion). 

 

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2 hours ago, audiofeline said:

One of the best articles I've read from an artist's point of view was written in 2002 by Janis Ian, a folksinger who started her recording career in the 1950/60's, with considerable success in the 1970's.

She speaks common sense.  The bullet points at the end of the article explaining how the recording contracts control and tie-up an artists career were very revealing. 

 

"The Internet Debacle: An Alternative View"

https://www.janisian.com/reading/internet.php

She also wrote and provides a follow-up article in 2002 to this called  "Fallout: A Follow Up To The Internet Debacle". 

https://www.janisian.com/reading/fallout.php

 

She also provides many intelligent articles on the industry, and helpful advice articles for music performers (I think they should be provided in music schools as required reading, but that's a lay-person's opinion). 

 

Always liked Janis Ian from when I heard the haunting melody Societys child  and can understand where her protest song ethos is the real deal :x As she says its easy to manipulate soft statistics without knowing peoples reasons .

 

  1. Quote

    Control the consumer who wishes to use it, and the legislators and laws that are supposed to protect that consumer.

    A quote that encapsulates why hdmi is now the standard for hifi not coincidentally ? 

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I didnt know what eventuated from those lawsuits. I know they went after a few everyday ppl to make an example but i didn't know that dispite all noise not much happened when bankruptcies come into the picture 

 

I thought there would b more mention of the mp3 tech, n ripping these from CDs you already purchased. It seemed to me once the iPod legitimised the mp3 it was the sharing of these and not necessarily via p2p platforms that really drove the nails in, for example, you could rip a few hours on to a single CD or even dvd and feed that into your car stereo. P2p just industrialised what was already happening. 

I'd like to kno how youtube fits into the mix - i see plenty if ppl at work (b4 Covid) with both crappy earbuds or fancy wireless noise cancelling cans streaming their fav old time classics. Is yt converting the odd add into revenue for the music's owners? 

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Not withstanding the RIAA's role in all of this... I remember being somewhat bemused at the hypocrisy of Lars Ulrich in his stand on Napster... for those of you who don't know, Lars was huge into tape trading (across the world in fact) in his teenage years & yet there he was very vocal in his opposition to the more modern equivalent now that he was a 'famous rockstar'...... no double standards there now was there??

 

I wouldn't mind the furore & court cases if the artist themselves really saw a tangible benefit... but, they don't.. they get paid a pittance in royalties from each song & it's the corporates that rake in the real profits... 

 

It's interesting to see both some old & bold artists, as well as new ones who are releasing their music online & asking fans to pay what they can afford if anything at all.... some of them are 'cutting out the middleman'... surprised the RIAA & worldwide equivalents aren't screaming about that... well, they probably are but, can't sue anyone for doing something they say is wrong... 

 

On a semi related topic... I remember Australian artists opposing a reduction in cost for CD's in this country... hmmm, maybe 20 years ago... & yet, when I visited the US at that time, I could buy their CD's from the same factories for half the price.... it's a bit like now with the cost of vinyl vs the CD... it's ridiculous & pure profiteering... tis the way of our wonderful world I guess... why settle for a reasonable profit when you can gouge the f... out of punters...

Edited by FNQ Outcast
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24 minutes ago, FNQ Outcast said:

It's interesting to see both some old & bold artists, as well as new ones who are releasing their music online & asking fans to pay what they can afford if anything at all.... some of them are 'cutting out the middleman'... surprised the RIAA & worldwide equivalents aren't screaming about that... well, they probably are but, can't sue anyone for doing something they say is wrong... 

Ime sure they would love to get some compensation ; maybe theyve realised they cant sue everybody .  The boy with his finger in the dyke is an analogy ; only the dam broke ? Dont even need the mp3 codec any more ; lossless flac on a increasingly cheaper hdd storage solution shows technology waits for no RIAA :)

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2 hours ago, FNQ Outcast said:

...On a semi related topic... I remember Australian artists opposing a reduction in cost for CD's in this country... hmmm, maybe 20 years ago... & yet, when I visited the US at that time, I could buy their CD's from the same factories for half the price.... it's a bit like now with the cost of vinyl vs the CD... it's ridiculous & pure profiteering... tis the way of our wonderful world I guess... why settle for a reasonable profit when you can gouge the f... out of punters...

I recall those ads, from memory it was artists like Jimmy Barnes and Darryl Braithwaite.  Their line was it was going to ruin the local music industry, and there would be not more local artists recording any more, and blah, blah, blah!  I remember wondering if there was anyone who would fall for such rubbish.  I must have clairvoyant ability, because my prediction that the local music industry would continue to thrive when we got cheaper CDs came true.  And also guess what happened.  When the price of CDs became more reasonable, I bought more!

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