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Remove lettering from turntable


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Before anything...HAPPY NEW YEAR !

My post is to ask , recently I acquired a Thorens TD 150  and looks like one of the previous owners put the speeds on the cover plate and they are starting to peel off, Is it safe to use Isopropyl alcohol to remove the rest of it ? Or is the plate cover on some kind of lacquer that could be damaged? Thanks for any info/ help.

PS. Would it be look as sacrilegious to fit a Grace G840F to it? ( no arm atm)

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I don't link that there is any lacquer on the top plate. Eucalyptus oil might work better than Isopropyl alcohol. 

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If it's adhesive lettering, citrus is the best.  De-Solv-It, at Bunnings.  Also good for removing adhesive stickers on CD cases and paper, it won't stain or leave a residue, or damage plastic surfaces.  I've never had any problems with it on metal. 

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3 hours ago, Telecine said:

I don't link that there is any lacquer on the top plate. Eucalyptus oil might work better than Isopropyl alcohol. 

So I did it ,it came easily but left a bit of a shadow where the number were, don't want to go crazy with the rubbing so will leave it like that maybe is going to desapear but better than having those half numbers. Cheers.

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6 minutes ago, southern_tango said:

So I did it ,it came easily but left a bit of a shadow where the number were, don't want to go crazy with the rubbing so will leave it like that maybe is going to desapear but better than having those half numbers. Cheers.

 

You could trying cleaning the whole top plate with the liquid form of Bar Keepers Friend Cleanser & Polish 340g - $8 at Woolies.

 

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A long time ago :o I had, and loved for quite a few years, a TD150 AB—and finally upgraded to a Linn. The table was great, the arm was OK—better after I added an anti-skating weight. 

The Grace arm should be an excellent match.

I'd love to see some pictures when it's all up and running, and let us know how it sounds!

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Will do,at the moment I have to decide what timber to use for the armboard (or maybe just veneer the one it has , have some walnut veneer) ,sand and oil the plinth .

Interesting fact is that it came with acrylic base and silicone feet...

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I love my 150.

The top plate is not laquered so any reasonable solvent is OK.

The original plinth is too light and ideally should be replaced.

Simple mods are:

Under body deadening paint on the sub chassis.

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20 minutes ago, Colin Rutter said:

I love my 150.

The top plate is not laquered so any reasonable solvent is OK.

The original plinth is too light and ideally should be replaced.

Simple mods are:

Under body deadening paint on the sub chassis.

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Will try that ( if nothing was than as it looks it had some work done , acrylic base,MKI cover plate)

About the plinth may keep it as I found a cover that is the perfect size

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If you keep the plinth, you could give it more mass and rigidity by fixing some thick hardwood ply internally - glue and screw it to the existing so it has a strong bond.  If you can't get thick ply, use several layers of it. 

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So... armboard been veneered in walnut (1970's iron on veneer still works) and after checking measurements for the tonearm,the 840 having a longer than usual counterweight overhangs at the back not allowing the use of the dust cover...bummer ( washer is on one possible location)

Another issue is the position of the connector ,hope that it could clear the base and how do you attach the RCA wires so they don't disturb the suspension?

( So far I wish I had a 707 but they are valued as gold)

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Turntables are best played without the lid.:)

I suppose you could cut the lid to allow the counterweight to protrude. It might make the lid hard to remove, although 'up' is second best to 'off completely'.

Thought—are there short counterweights available for the Grace? They were modded extensively in the past.

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14 minutes ago, GregWormald said:

Turntables are best played without the lid.:)

I suppose you could cut the lid to allow the counterweight to protrude. It might make the lid hard to remove, although 'up' is second best to 'off completely'.

Thought—are there short counterweights available for the Grace? They were modded extensively in the past.

No Idea but the center pivot is thicker than the normal ones I've seen ( a bit dusty but this is the one I am going to use)

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So been busy at work ,so today I have the chance to dig a bit on the Thorens ,removed the acrylic base ,looks nicely made  but looks like it is missing the middle hole for the spindle guess it touches when loosing the springs.

Thinking to replace the feet for some stainless steel and rubber I should have somewhere.

Plinth looks very poor but I am scared to death to remove the thin cover to get to the screws.

Btw is it normal that the cover looks a bit concave?

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And my result was ,how to say it??? Crappy maybe?

After quite a few attempts and thinking the armboard was lined up it finished croocked  , the arm location was as stated in the plan but it finished too much forward with the headshell overhanging the plinth .

still have to relocate the arm wires as they push the armboard up and after further inspection realized the cover plate is full of little chips.

So all in all a bit of a catastrophe...

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I think the technique to get the armboard straight is to put thin strips of wood in the cracks when fixing it, then remove it when the armoard is fixed.  You could use a rasp to move the arm hole back so it can be relocated in the correct position.  So all in all maybe not a completecatastrophe, more of a work in progress.

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51 minutes ago, audiofeline said:

I think the technique to get the armboard straight is to put thin strips of wood in the cracks when fixing it, then remove it when the armoard is fixed.  You could use a rasp to move the arm hole back so it can be relocated in the correct position.  So all in all maybe not a completecatastrophe, more of a work in progress.

I did that ,had to make a few to match the closest to the gap but when springs move back in position things get ugly.

Is there a way to loc the sub chassis in place?

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Remember that it's the cartridge overhang at the spindle that counts. Moving the arm hole is no big deal. 

Getting the armboard straight can be difficult. On Linns the final work is done by rotating the springs and ensuring a correct 'bounce'. I've seen a few that bounced right but weren't centred.

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6 minutes ago, GregWormald said:

Remember that it's the cartridge overhang at the spindle that counts. Moving the arm hole is no big deal. 

Getting the armboard straight can be difficult. On Linns the final work is done by rotating the springs and ensuring a correct 'bounce'. I've seen a few that bounced right but weren't centred.

Looks like this uses that same principle  ,good idea the person that did the base count that in the design.

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