Jump to content

Bottlehead Crack


Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, gypr1961 said:

Hi 

 

Has anyone with no previous electronics building experience built a Bottlehead Crack amp. 

 

 

If you have, how did you find the process ?

 

Cheers

From building four of the kits I’d say you want good basic experience with tubes and have done lots of assembly and soldering. But instructions are very good. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, mwhouston said:

From building four of the kits I’d say you want good basic experience with tubes and have done lots of assembly and soldering. But instructions are very good. 

Thanks I have zero of the above :)  The articles say no experience necessary and the instructions are clear, but I havent soldered anything in 30 years and remember it took a while to do it well, so I think I'll pass

 

Thanks for the info

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, gypr1961 said:

Thanks I have zero of the above :)  The articles say no experience necessary and the instructions are clear, but I havent soldered anything in 30 years and remember it took a while to do it well, so I think I'll pass

 

Thanks for the info

That's not the attitude!

 

Soldering is easy. Watch a couple videos and you pick it up real quick.

 

Haven't read anyone, with no experience, building the Crack and regretting it.

 

@barbz127 Just finished one too.

Link to post
Share on other sites


20 hours ago, gypr1961 said:

Hi 

 

Has anyone with no previous electronics building experience built a Bottlehead Crack amp. 

 

 

If you have, how did you find the process ?

 

Cheers

 

The Bottlehead Crack is a simple amplifier using point to point wiring.

If you follow the instructions carefully you should have no problems.  Just be mindful that you are working on a project that involves mains (240v) and high d.c. voltages inside the chassis.  These are potentially lethal and I advise you exercise care when working on this kind of gear.  Electrolytic capacitors in tube circuits can hold a lethal charge for some time even after the power has been switched off.

 

Contrary to popular misconception good soldering is an art.  By all means watch a few YouTube videos but just be aware that YouTube land is full of  so called "experts" who have NFI what they are doing.   I recommend Mr. Carlson's Lab, eevBlog, Blueglow Electronics as these guys know what they are talking about. 

 

I recommend a soldering iron of at least 48 watts rating equipped with a chisel faced tip.  You won't need any fancy electronic temperature controlled iron.  For point to point work I often use my old Weller TCP-W series iron.  It uses Currie Point temperature control and delivers plenty of heat to tag strips and large ground planes so the dwell time is reduced. Avoid those tiny irons which whilst good for those tiny surface mount components is really not likely to deliver the good results you want on tag strip point to point wiring. 

 

Second bit of advice is use good old fashioned leaded 60Sn/40Pb solder with a flux core.   I don't recommend lead-free solder.  IME, it's more difficult to get a good result with, requires a higher soldering temperature and unless you are building or repairing a RoHS compliant device not required.  Please, please avoid those cheap nasty Chinese solder products you see advertised on Ebay.   Stick to a well known brand like Ersin Multicore.  You'll get very good results.  A 200 - 250g roll of say 0.81mm to 1mm size solder will last the average hobbyist a very long time. 

 

If you haven't soldered in quite a few years I recommend that you visit your local electronics parts store and buy a couple of tag strips, a 5 pack or two of 1W carbon resistors and a metre or so hookup wire to practice your soldering skills with.  An inexpensive way to refresh those old and possibly rusty skills.

 

P2309 9 Way Terminal Tag Strip - Altronics

R7225 100R 1W 5% Carbon Film Resistor PK 5 - Altronics

 

Last but by no means least, get some good hand tools if you don't already have them - flush diagonal cutters, small needle nose pliers, screwdrivers, box spanners etc.

 

If you don't have one already, an inexpensive digital multimeter in case you need to fault find or verify the values of resistors.

 

Happy DIYing.

 

Cheers,

Alan R.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Monkeyboi said:

 

The Bottlehead Crack is a simple amplifier using point to point wiring.

If you follow the instructions carefully you should have no problems.  Just be mindful that you are working on a project that involves mains (240v) and high d.c. voltages inside the chassis.  These are potentially lethal and I advise you exercise care when working on this kind of gear.  Electrolytic capacitors in tube circuits can hold a lethal charge for some time even after the power has been switched off.

 

Contrary to popular misconception good soldering is an art.  By all means watch a few YouTube videos but just be aware that YouTube land is full of  so called "experts" who have NFI what they are doing.   I recommend Mr. Carlson's Lab, eevBlog, Blueglow Electronics as these guys know what they are talking about. 

 

I recommend a soldering iron of at least 48 watts rating equipped with a chisel faced tip.  You won't need any fancy electronic temperature controlled iron.  For point to point work I often use my old Weller TCP-W series iron.  It uses Currie Point temperature control and delivers plenty of heat to tag strips and large ground planes so the dwell time is reduced. Avoid those tiny irons which whilst good for those tiny surface mount components is really not likely to deliver the good results you want on tag strip point to point wiring. 

 

Second bit of advice is use good old fashioned leaded 60Sn/40Pb solder with a flux core.   I don't recommend lead-free solder.  IME, it's more difficult to get a good result with, requires a higher soldering temperature and unless you are building or repairing a RoHS compliant device not required.  Please, please avoid those cheap nasty Chinese solder products you see advertised on Ebay.   Stick to a well known brand like Ersin Multicore.  You'll get very good results.  A 200 - 250g roll of say 0.81mm to 1mm size solder will last the average hobbyist a very long time. 

 

If you haven't soldered in quite a few years I recommend that you visit your local electronics parts store and buy a couple of tag strips, a 5 pack or two of 1W carbon resistors and a metre or so hookup wire to practice your soldering skills with.  An inexpensive way to refresh those old and possibly rusty skills.

 

P2309 9 Way Terminal Tag Strip - Altronics

R7225 100R 1W 5% Carbon Film Resistor PK 5 - Altronics

 

Last but by no means least, get some good hand tools if you don't already have them - flush diagonal cutters, small needle nose pliers, screwdrivers, box spanners etc.

 

If you don't have one already, an inexpensive digital multimeter in case you need to fault find or verify the values of resistors.

 

Happy DIYing.

 

Cheers,

Alan R.

 

Thanks for the info, gives me something to think about

 

Cheers

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...