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Concerts that ruled, Concerts that sucked.


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Bruce Springsteen solo in Warsaw in about 1995 (?) was one of the very best.

 

Bob Dylan in Sydney in 1978 or so was a bit hit and miss.  I was in about row 10 a the Showgrounds I think and some guy behind kept shouting out "Knocking on Heaven's Door".  This was between EVERY song and very annoying.  Bob finally did it as an encore..... as a reggae song.  At the end our man behind shouted "Now do it properly".  Can't help wondering if this was the wrath of Bob or co-incidence.

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Winners: Nick Cave at Collingwood Town Hall the week before Christmas 1994. Brutal show, the band we’re on fire and really gave me thought as to how hard he could rock.   Ministry at th

I can only really pinpoint the year of the first concert I saw. 1966, grade 6 lunchtime concert at school. Masters Apprentices. Really made a big impression on me. Countless fantastic s

I might be bias  😎 Winners David Bowie 11/11/78      Adelaide Oval David Bowie 09/11/83    Adelaide Oval David Bowie  23/02/04  Adelaide Entertainment Centre,   Losers

Nearly all of these were in the Uk, memorable ones .. from memory the years should be close 

 

1972 Man ... plus about 4 other concerts they did post this date 

1973  Budgie ... rocking it hard 

1973 Stealers Wheel .. unknown and I was about 1 of 20 turned up 

1975 Roxy Music .. Leo Sayer was the unknown support act 🤭

1976 Genesis ... mystical .. Suppers ready lives with me 

1978 Clash .. so called punk rock ..getting quality 

1981 Squeeze ..small club ripper of a gig .. Jules on the ivories 

1982 Queen .. girlfriend at the time loved Freddy ..

1983 Rolling Stones .. Keef was rocking it 

1986 Tears for Fears 

 

2018 Roger Hodgson in Sydney


lots of bands let down by poor sound quality or too large a stadium .. The Who in 1976 .. although Alex Harvey was a blast as the support, Rod Stewart in LA in 81 

 

A load of tosh 

1973 Atomic Rooster .. didn’t play was crowd was small 

1978 Stranglers .. crowd ruined it with all the fighting 

1980 Marc Almond / Soft Cell ..  right up himself .. should have put a tape on and left 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Slightly perplexed by the number of posters whose last memorable gig was in the mid 80s 😕

 

Indicative of the average age of the SNA demographic or the age when most stop attending gigs?

 

My music loving (rock snobs) circle of friends used to have a theory of the music rule of 3s. After age 23 most people bought 3 albums per year (big stuff, U2 etc) and go to a concert every 3 years (big stuff again, which was spoken of as either the greatest or worst thing ever) 😀😆

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43 minutes ago, zenikoy said:

Slightly perplexed by the number of posters whose last memorable gig was in the mid 80s 😕

 

Indicative of the average age of the SNA demographic or the age when most stop attending gigs?

 

My music loving (rock snobs) circle of friends used to have a theory of the music rule of 3s. After age 23 most people bought 3 albums per year (big stuff, U2 etc) and go to a concert every 3 years (big stuff again, which was spoken of as either the greatest or worst thing ever) 😀😆

Its odd you are perplexed as clearly you are so much better than anyone else,,,,,

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40 minutes ago, zenikoy said:

Slightly perplexed by the number of posters whose last memorable gig was in the mid 80s 😕

 

Indicative of the average age of the SNA demographic or the age when most stop attending gigs?

 

My music loving (rock snobs) circle of friends used to have a theory of the music rule of 3s. After age 23 most people bought 3 albums per year (big stuff, U2 etc) and go to a concert every 3 years (big stuff again, which was spoken of as either the greatest or worst thing ever) 😀😆

For me it post 80s it was 

marriage 

kids 

work 

becoming more of a priority.. 

you could also ask how many SNA members over 55 

a) put their hifi / Lps / cds in the spare room / shed as their kids were growing up as they had to cope with progeny trying ( succeeding) to put small toys into the video recorder or CD player ...or seeing how far  the turntable could throw their robot across the living room ( boys 😇😇

b) family life and work left little time for going to concerts ..with me going overseas 8 to 10 times / year with work iPod and iPhone were few chances to listen to music 

 

 

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Concerts that ruled:

 

Deep Purple -Auckland 1984 (Very first show of the MK II reunion world tour)

Page and Plant - Brisbane 1996

Yes - Melbourne 2003 (Full Circle tour)

Jeff Buckley - Brisbane 1996

Heart - Brisbane 2011

Suzanne Vega - Auckland 1987

 

Concerts that sucked;

 

Nirvana - Brisbane 1992

Lou Reed - Brisbane 1995 (Alternate Nation festival)

Bob Dylan - Brisbane 2001

Coldplay - Gold Coast 2001

 

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I can only really pinpoint the year of the first concert I saw.

1966, grade 6 lunchtime concert at school.

Masters Apprentices. Really made a big impression on me.

Countless fantastic shows since but my memory is a bit Hazzzy.

One that I thought was ordinary was Live at Adelaide entertainment centre, not sure what year.

Bad because it sounded really bad where I was, couldn't get anywhere near the action.

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Best concert: can't choose between the Nigel Kennedy Band playing Jimi Hendrix, The Funk Brothers in Chicago or William Barton. All had great sound and performances. Bryan Ferry at the Melbourne Blues and Music Festival (outdoors) was great but the sound not too good.

 

Worst: almost as difficult, but The Kinks in the early 80s at Festival Hall weren't too good, jut going through the motions.  Sound awful, of course.

 

Worst ever was The Shanghai Ballet: dreadful music, embarrassing Communist 'little red book' story-line, we left at interval. It was free but still bad value.  We were lucky: there  were some famous politicians including a former PM in the audience, and they couldn't leave!

 

Geoff

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Is there a category for concerts you wish you attended?

Anyway I will start.

U2, UB40, Pretenders. London late80's. Hanging out in Earls court area. Couldn't get a ticket. Never did see U2.

Paul Kelly, Apples tour. Wish I made the effort.

Tool. Melbourne.

Enough winging for now. 

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On 06/11/2020 at 6:59 PM, zenikoy said:

Slightly perplexed by the number of posters whose last memorable gig was in the mid 80s 😕

 

Indicative of the average age of the SNA demographic or the age when most stop attending gigs?

 

My music loving (rock snobs) circle of friends used to have a theory of the music rule of 3s. After age 23 most people bought 3 albums per year (big stuff, U2 etc) and go to a concert every 3 years (big stuff again, which was spoken of as either the greatest or worst thing ever) 😀😆

Indicative of my age at any rate.

 

But I did see the Wombats at Festering Hall n Melbourne a few years ago (9?).  That is pretty contemporary heh?

 

And a great band and gig by the way.

Edited by Mutatis Mutandis
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On 06/11/2020 at 6:59 PM, zenikoy said:

Slightly perplexed by the number of posters whose last memorable gig was in the mid 80s 😕

 

Indicative of the average age of the SNA demographic or the age when most stop attending gigs?

 

My music loving (rock snobs) circle of friends used to have a theory of the music rule of 3s. After age 23 most people bought 3 albums per year (big stuff, U2 etc) and go to a concert every 3 years (big stuff again, which was spoken of as either the greatest or worst thing ever) 😀😆

So let’s see this rock snobs list😀

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18 hours ago, Rocketfrogs said:

Yes - Melbourne 2003 (Full Circle tour)

 

I've always missed that Yes have been touring, so never got to see them live. And I understand that Steve Howe is not at the peak of his game any more. Still love thier live albums more than their studio ones (mostly).

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One that stands out for me is Brian Wilson with band at a small venue at the Arts Centre here in Melbourne. It was a small affair - at a guess 200 max, in about 2002. I was in my early thirties and had seen my fair share of indie, pubby type bands. Been to few big concerts but prior to turning 30, lived in Tassie. A lot of the really big names simply didn't bother. 

 

Brian Wilson stands out as I did like the beach boys as a kid and he simply had this "stardom" feel to him. At one stage Brian was starting a song on the piano and someone spilled a drink everywhere, all over the cables. Brian saw it and instead of simply drawing attention to the f-up, he stopped and decided to tell a story. He was awesome. I see on youtube his health is really declining but still touring - a shadow of his former self sadly.

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15 hours ago, keyse1 said:

So let’s see this rock snobs list😀

I did post my single best and single worst earlier in the thread. Too many others to list.

 

Though specially for you I will say that I have seen Dylan four times and never been disappointed. The best in my opinion was the 2014 theatre show I saw in Perth. Much like Neil Young shows, casual fans are often upset with the setlist or the delivery. This 2014 concert seemed to be attended by a crowd familiar with his Time Out of Mind to present catalogue and appreciated it. I heard only positive comments on the way out, with only one person whining that he didn't play "Hurricane".

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Concerts that ruled:

 

The Stooges at Festival Hall 2013 I think. Just awesome...Iggy owned it (and the sound was really good considering the venue )

 

The Cure at Rod Laver I think a couple of years ago. Played 3 hours and didn't really look like stopping.

 

Beasts of Bourbon at the palace I think when the Low Road was released. Tex menaced the crowd while the band absolutely rocked it

 

Pixies ...Waited years to finally see them...V festival was OK but caught them at a surprise gig at  Northcote Social Club...amazing
 

Leftfield with only Neil Barnes but great live percussion and a huge PA. One of those "play the album" events, but what an album!

 

 

 

Concerts that sucked;

 

Lou Reed at Sport and Entertainment Centre Melbourne 1984 ....terrible sound and he seemed bored. It think it was "New Sensations" tour which wasn't his best material. I was so excited as a 17 year old and so disappointed...

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1 hour ago, anotherdavid said:

The Stooges at Festival Hall 2013


Saw them at BDO. I was about to say it would've been around 2013. Then googled and it was 2006! Bloody hell time flies.

 

One of my most memorable festival gigs. It was awesome. Seeing Iggy and the Stooges live = another bucket list gig ticked off.

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Winners

Earth Wind and Fire - Bluesfest.  So much colour (clothes), energy and dancing - was just wonderful.

Crosby, Nash and Stills - Bluesfest - Crosby lost his voice and wanted to stop  .. Nash says we haven't been here for xx years, everyone knows the songs so lets keep going ... they did and we all sang

Blue Oyster Cult - LA hills somewhere 2004, small audience in a rambling hotel.  Buck was in scintillating form .. and his brothers just a great tight band

Roger Hodgson - Bluesfest - doing the Supertramp huge hits with a full band.  Stunning ..

Grace Jones - Bluesfest - brilliant imagery, and driving music .. magic set even if she did keep us waiting

Osibisa - Melbourne 1976 - driving African rock - such energy

Simply Red - State Theatre 2016 - went hoarse singing along with everyone .. Red was in amazing singing form ..

Crowded House - Bluesfest -went hoarse singing along with everyone

 

Loosers

BB King - Bluesfest -- so sorry to see him wheeled out on stage, tried to do his trademark solos, was well past it .. just using his name, so sad

Peter Green - Bluesfest - had a really bad afternoon set - loosing track of where he was, I walked away, was too great a player for me to watch ..  yet played a few days later in Melbourne to raving reviews

America - Melbourne 1975 - late night set - one of the core guys was so stoned, was continually smoking joints,  and he spent the entire performance tuning his guitar way to loud, wrecked the show.  I had all their albums, luv'd them .. felt totally cheated and still do 😒

Edited by Rosco8
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The Good

 

2009 – The Veils – Oxford Art Factory Sydney – just one hell of intense performance!  Finn Andrews just fully immersed in the performance – absolute standout in concert going experience

2006 - Pearl Jam - Acer Arena - Sydney– hadn’t really listened to them so went along out of curiosity….extraordinary connection between band and fans

2009 - Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds - All Tomorrow Parties festival Cockatoo Island – also my first experience of them live.  Big impact when in first coupla rows!

2019 - Underworld – Sydney Opera House – seen many a modern show at the SOH and it seems to suck the life out things – but this was just another thing altogether….

1985 – Neil Young and International Harvesters – Mar 22 Entertainment Centre Sydney …3 hour show…20 min last song (Down By the River with Springsteen walk on) amazing show….and LOUD even at back of Entertainment Centre though bloke 4 rows in front fell asleep which I thought was impressive (so did security when tying to help him leave).  A lot more intensity than concert I saw just 4 nights earlier

2012 – Radiohead – Nov 12: Seen them a few times but this show was super tight and intense….These Are My Twisted Words ; Ful Stop, with the music seemingly concentrated as the lights lowered to a high intensity ceiling over the band; Planet Telex played like some swirling 1970s psychedelic relic….best one of their shows I’ve seen

1990s  - Died Pretty and Hunters & Collectors - Selinas in Sydney - kinda recall a concert where both were playing, and the fact that it was a great night (with a few ascerbic digs at Midnight Oil by Seymour). Can't recall the date and can't find a record of it....so not sure that i am mashing 2 nights into one, but i was pretty sure they were 2 of 3 bands on the night.  It was post Ghost Nation.  

1992 – The Cure – Sydney Entertainment Centre – Wish tour….just loved it- great gig…hadn’t heard much of their back catalogue at that time but certainly headed there after…really great!

2008 – Sigur Ros – Sydney Hordern Pavilion – before the band started to erode – amazing exercise in people just standing and feeling

2005 - Dirty Three – Hyde Park Barracks Sydney – great gig in a tent!  Loud, visceral and emotive

2016 - CHVRCHES – Enmore Theatre Sydney – great sound and energy!  Really impressive show

2011 – Grinderman – Factory Theatre Sydney – what an eminent exercise in male mid life crisis swagger!

2013 – Godspeed You! Black Emperor – Enmore Theatre Sydney – now that is quite an experience (if you like that sort of thing 😊 )

2005 – The Frames – great performance, amazing audience engagement and connection by Hansard before the fame of the movie Once seemed to create a fork in the road for this band

1996 – Crowded House – Sydney Opera House Forecourt – Farewell to World….an amazing spirit

 

The Disappointing

1998 - Pink Floyd – Entertainment Centre Sydney – just a little average.  Sounded to me like Gilmour was playing just a little behind the time signature for the start of Shine On. Probably not a BAD concert, but on the whole maybe my expectations were too high.

2007 - Eric Clapton - Entertainment Centre Sydney - I think this was the last Clapton tour before you had to buy tickets by transferring real estate to Clapton's ticketing agency  ($500 tix ...really).  Derek Trucks was a stand out.  But the show just felt kinda comfortable inhabiting his own legend.  Not a patch on his 1984 show at the Hordern.

 

The Seriously Disappointing

1985 – Van Morrison - Sydney Entertainment centre – just didn’t feel like it mattered. To anybody.

2003 – Coldplay – Went along out of curiosity -Chris Martin more worried about how the crowd were behaving for the DVD (being filmed at the concert).  No bright lights on anybody other than him. Felt like an awful exercise in self aggrandisement.

2011 - Explosions in the Sky – The Metro Sydney – seemed strangely immersed in its own sameness

1986 - Dire Straits – I was a BIG fan until this show.  The rolling merchandise tour seemed a little out scale and self important.  All seemed a little grandiose and smug.  At one of the shows I attended (saw a couple) Knopfler’s guitar FM broke down just prior to the striking chord after the quiet beat in Private Investigations.  Not that he knew. Much scurrying as band played on.  Light show finished the song before they did.  Kinda funny. 

 

 

 

 

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In 2017 spent two days at the North Sea Jazz Festival (3 day event) in Rotterdam. A feast of great bands over those two days!

 

Prince's New Power Generation

Dhaffer Youssef

Kamasi Washington

Matthew Herbert's Brexit Band

Cinematic Orchestra

Chick Corea

Maceo Parker

 

and Grace Jones! By god she's still got it!!

 

 

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2 hours ago, Dilettanteque said:

The Good

 

2009 – The Veils – Oxford Art Factory Sydney – just one hell of intense performance!  Finn Andrews just fully immersed in the performance – absolute standout in concert going experience

2006 - Pearl Jam - Acer Arena - Sydney– hadn’t really listened to them so went along out of curiosity….extraordinary connection between band and fans

2009 - Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds - All Tomorrow Parties festival Cockatoo Island – also my first experience of them live.  Big impact when in first coupla rows!

2019 - Underworld – Sydney Opera House – seen many a modern show at the SOH and it seems to suck the life out things – but this was just another thing altogether….

1985 – Neil Young and International Harvesters – Mar 22 Entertainment Centre Sydney …3 hour show…20 min last song (Down By the River with Springsteen walk on) amazing show….and LOUD even at back of Entertainment Centre though bloke 4 rows in front fell asleep which I thought was impressive (so did security when tying to help him leave).  A lot more intensity than concert I saw just 4 nights earlier

2012 – Radiohead – Nov 12: Seen them a few times but this show was super tight and intense….These Are My Twisted Words ; Ful Stop, with the music seemingly concentrated as the lights lowered to a high intensity ceiling over the band; Planet Telex played like some swirling 1970s psychedelic relic….best one of their shows I’ve seen

1990s  - Died Pretty and Hunters & Collectors - Selinas in Sydney - kinda recall a concert where both were playing, and the fact that it was a great night (with a few ascerbic digs at Midnight Oil by Seymour). Can't recall the date and can't find a record of it....so not sure that i am mashing 2 nights into one, but i was pretty sure they were 2 of 3 bands on the night.  It was post Ghost Nation.  

1992 – The Cure – Sydney Entertainment Centre – Wish tour….just loved it- great gig…hadn’t heard much of their back catalogue at that time but certainly headed there after…really great!

2008 – Sigur Ros – Sydney Hordern Pavilion – before the band started to erode – amazing exercise in people just standing and feeling

2005 - Dirty Three – Hyde Park Barracks Sydney – great gig in a tent!  Loud, visceral and emotive

2016 - CHVRCHES – Enmore Theatre Sydney – great sound and energy!  Really impressive show

2011 – Grinderman – Factory Theatre Sydney – what an eminent exercise in male mid life crisis swagger!

2013 – Godspeed You! Black Emperor – Enmore Theatre Sydney – now that is quite an experience (if you like that sort of thing 😊 )

2005 – The Frames – great performance, amazing audience engagement and connection by Hansard before the fame of the movie Once seemed to create a fork in the road for this band

1996 – Crowded House – Sydney Opera House Forecourt – Farewell to World….an amazing spirit

 

The Disappointing

1998 - Pink Floyd – Entertainment Centre Sydney – just a little average.  Sounded to me like Gilmour was playing just a little behind the time signature for the start of Shine On. Probably not a BAD concert, but on the whole maybe my expectations were too high.

2007 - Eric Clapton - Entertainment Centre Sydney - I think this was the last Clapton tour before you had to buy tickets by transferring real estate to Clapton's ticketing agency  ($500 tix ...really).  Derek Trucks was a stand out.  But the show just felt kinda comfortable inhabiting his own legend.  Not a patch on his 1984 show at the Hordern.

 

The Seriously Disappointing

1985 – Van Morrison - Sydney Entertainment centre – just didn’t feel like it mattered. To anybody.

2003 – Coldplay – Went along out of curiosity -Chris Martin more worried about how the crowd were behaving for the DVD (being filmed at the concert).  No bright lights on anybody other than him. Felt like an awful exercise in self aggrandisement.

2011 - Explosions in the Sky – The Metro Sydney – seemed strangely immersed in its own sameness

1986 - Dire Straits – I was a BIG fan until this show.  The rolling merchandise tour seemed a little out scale and self important.  All seemed a little grandiose and smug.  At one of the shows I attended (saw a couple) Knopfler’s guitar FM broke down just prior to the striking chord after the quiet beat in Private Investigations.  Not that he knew. Much scurrying as band played on.  Light show finished the song before they did.  Kinda funny. 

 

 

 

 

No Bob Dylan?

I saw that Neil Young concert in Brisbane at a push bike riders field 

10 years after my obsession ended

Still had a knot in my stomach from anticipation 

And Van Morrison in Brisbane 

Absolute heaven

I read the reviews about Sydney and from memory were not good

More about him not talking to the audience 

Sublime music including Summertime in England 

One of the highlights of my life at rock n roll concerts 😀

And he had a killer sax player

Lots of comments about not talking or his small overweight look

I never noticed it but after all I’d read about Van The Man if he’d talked I would have been shocked😀

Think I’ll go listen to In The Summertime now

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3 hours ago, keyse1 said:

And Van Morrison in Brisbane 

Absolute heaven

I read the reviews about Sydney and from memory were not good

More about him not talking to the audience 

Sublime music including Summertime in England 

One of the highlights of my life at rock n roll concerts 😀

And he had a killer sax player

Lots of comments about not talking or his small overweight look

I never noticed it but after all I’d read about Van The Man if he’d talked I would have been shocked😀

Think I’ll go listen to In The Summertime now

 

Similar experience here with Van's Melbourne show.  Wife & I loved it.  The performances were superb and getting to see Pee Wee Ellis in full flight on the reeds was great.  I just accept that some artists prefer to let the songs do the talking and if they do that bit really well, then anything else is a bonus.

The friend who came with us was not impressed with his lack of engagement and wanted her money back.

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7 hours ago, keyse1 said:

No Bob Dylan?

I saw that Neil Young concert in Brisbane at a push bike riders field 

10 years after my obsession ended

Still had a knot in my stomach from anticipation 

And Van Morrison in Brisbane 

Absolute heaven

I read the reviews about Sydney and from memory were not good

More about him not talking to the audience 

Sublime music including Summertime in England 

One of the highlights of my life at rock n roll concerts 😀

And he had a killer sax player

Lots of comments about not talking or his small overweight look

I never noticed it but after all I’d read about Van The Man if he’d talked I would have been shocked😀

Think I’ll go listen to In The Summertime now

With Van I think the crowd expected to see "Last Waltz" Morrison. Man who moved. Crowd not on the whole accepting of the insular world of the carefully crafted artistic performance.  This was a city that was also getting the "eminent showman" stories coming from Springsteen's early Aussie concerts with all the marekting hype of the Born In The USA thing. And Neil Young''s 2.5+ hour concerts  starting here and rumoured from NZ.

 

Van was a "big name" and i think the hype of the touring big names and the related expectations  for him was just difficult from square 1.  But it did feel disinterested.  The "not talking" was just Van...the "not really turniung up" that night was always a classic Van roll of teh dice possibility, with a few things titling the table in that direction. 

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Reminds me also of Ron Peno and the Superstitions at the Spotted Mallard in Brunswick. The band was really cookin and Ron was flying, it was a pleasure to watch, the energy he put out felt like he was levitating.  Suspect there may have been substances involved.

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Great thread - just found it and spent half of my working afternoon not working but reminiscing and trying to remember!!

 

All concerts are generally great (except the ones that truly sucked) but my fave fave concerts were the following;

Mr Bungle, ANU Refectory 2000 – pretty much played the entire California album and then threw in the best of the best from previous albums – Techno Allah, Merry Go Bye-Bye, Egg, Quote Unquote and others. The beers flowed and the it just kept getting better with each song.

Helmet, The Manning Bar 2017 – Betty album from track 1 to 14, with added encore of ‘in the meantime’ and some new tracks. Ok it was a totally different line-up from when the album was released except for Page, but that album is just amazing and they played it with aplomb. There was only a crowd of 250-300! Crazy. Hottest merch lady I ever saw in my life. Might have been why I bought 2 t-shirts.

Wynton Marsalis, Canberra Convention Centre 2000 – I think it was the Coltrane concerts or something. I had never been to a concert with a big band, blew my mind. I took a date that I wanted to impress with some musical culture - it worked, clothes were removed.

 

Worst

Tool, Canberra Convention Centre 2002 – just too loud or too small a space and it just sucked, should’ve driven to Sydney and seen them there. Took the same date from the Wynton Concert (who had become my gf) wasn't as impressed, clothes stayed on.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 03/11/2020 at 1:50 PM, cccrchairman said:

Hit

Morphine - Annandale  Hotel (maybe 92/93 - Bughouse support act)

 

Miss

Beck - Metro (94 - Jon Spencer slayed him as support act. Love Beck. He has come along way)

I was Google searching for the date of the Morphine gig with Bughouse support and found this post. Hit!

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a concert i will never forget(well most of it)the mad dogs +englishman tour australia 1972,when joe came out on stage holding a large can of beer he rambled off a few expletive's about the australian government and then tried to sing,he was so pissed and stoned it was pathetic to watch,he stumbled to the back of the stage trying to get out but behind the curtain backdrop was only a brick wall,this was festival hall in melbourne,he went and sat in one of the base bins until he was helped off stage,the band played on for what seemed forever then joe came back on stage,hair soaking wet and let it rip the place went wild and so did joe,unbelievable show from joe and what a band,have seen him several times when he came back to oz never disappointed always great shows,he is sadly missed.

n reality, it was a storm in a teacup – similar to the furore that had surrounded the Rolling Stones in Britain a few years earlier, when a famous 1967 editorial in the Times accused the judiciary system of “breaking a butterfly on a wheel” in its sentencing of Jagger to three months in jail for the possession of four tablets of amphetamine sulphate.

Cocker believed the Australian federal government needed to distract a populace disillusioned with its awful electoral performance, and these “uncouth, dirty-haired, sloppily dressed, show business freaks” served as a handy scapegoat.

Cocker continued his tour in Melbourne, via Adelaide, to be greeted by newspaper headlines yelling “GET OUT COCKER!” Five days later he told his audience: “In five years marijuana will be legalised in Australia, and the same cat who is trying to throw us out now will be smoking it himself.” In return, his fans refused to let him go until he’d performed a triumphant Cry Me A River.

The very same evening, however, the singer was arrested after an alleged brawl with his girlfriend in the foyer of Melbourne’s Chateau Commodore hotel. He was held overnight on charges of assault and resisting arrest. This time, immigration minister Jim Forbes told him he had four hours to leave the country. Concerts were cancelled.

It caused a massive public outcry, but the view of then prime minister William McMahon was that the offended were all Labor voters anyway. Forbes’ own daughter Emma – then aged 17 – saw it somewhat differently. “Like any self-obsessed teenager, it’s probably the only thing I remember about my father’s political career,” she recalls, four decades on, to Guardian Australia. “I was so mortified that my dad had done this.”

The tour’s promoter Harry M Miller wrote in his 1983 biography My Story: “We had to cancel concerts in Brisbane and Perth. Prodded by a deportation order, Joe flew home. His legal transgressions could not be excused, but he had the misfortune to be in Australia when the conservative knee-jerk was lethal and the federal government of the time was reacting to an electorate disillusioned with its political performance.”

Joe Cocker performing at Sydney’s Enmore Theatre in 2002. Photograph: AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Despite all the furore, Cocker returned 11 more times to tour Australia – a country that clearly loves his down-to-earth bluesy demeanour – and even got rehabilitated into the establishment, when his version of Unchain My Heart was used in the Howard government’s 2000 campaign for the goods and services tax.

For this, Cocker got paid $169,000. Sounds a lot? Perhaps not, when taking stock of the US tours that were cancelled as a result of the Australian drugs debacle – and the fact the 1970s were mostly a write-off for Cocker, ravaged by alcohol and drugs and the burnout of success.

“The Australians actually owned up that they set us up,” Cocker told the Guardian’s Michael Hann in a 2013 interview. “Somebody wrote a book a few years ago saying it was a government thing, an election thing – we were just used as guinea pigs. But at the time it was real scary to be down in Australia. You didn’t have that communication thing you do nowadays.”

And for what it’s worth, Emma confirms that there is some regret on the part of her father for these events past.

Rest in peace, Joe.

 

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5 minutes ago, ray4410 said:

 

“The Australians actually owned up that they set us up,” Cocker told the Guardian’s Michael Hann in a 2013 interview. “Somebody wrote a book a few years ago saying it was a government thing, an election thing – we were just used as guinea pigs. But at the time it was real scary to be down in Australia. You didn’t have that communication thing you do nowadays.”

And for what it’s worth, Emma confirms that there is some regret on the part of her father for these events past.

Rest in peace, Joe.

 

Fun fact:  for most of my adult life I thought Joe had cerebral palsy.  But then I saw a clip of him on Rage (might have been Countdown sourced) where someone is trying to interview him and I realised he was just drunk.

 

I did feel rather foolish.

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3 hours ago, ray4410 said:

Joe's movement's on stage was him feeling the music,as in playing guitar or piano,just his unique way of expressing himself through his music.

I had tickets for the Brisbane show😀

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4 hours ago, ray4410 said:

a concert i will never forget(well most of it)the mad dogs +englishman tour australia 1972,when joe came out on stage holding a large can of beer he rambled off a few expletive's about the australian government and then tried to sing,he was so pissed and stoned it was pathetic to watch,he stumbled to the back of the stage trying to get out but behind the curtain backdrop was only a brick wall,this was festival hall in melbourne,he went and sat in one of the base bins until he was helped off stage,the band played on for what seemed forever then joe came back on stage,hair soaking wet and let it rip the place went wild and so did joe,unbelievable show from joe and what a band,have seen him several times when he came back to oz never disappointed always great shows,he is sadly missed.

n reality, it was a storm in a teacup – similar to the furore that had surrounded the Rolling Stones in Britain a few years earlier, when a famous 1967 editorial in the Times accused the judiciary system of “breaking a butterfly on a wheel” in its sentencing of Jagger to three months in jail for the possession of four tablets of amphetamine sulphate.

Cocker believed the Australian federal government needed to distract a populace disillusioned with its awful electoral performance, and these “uncouth, dirty-haired, sloppily dressed, show business freaks” served as a handy scapegoat.

Cocker continued his tour in Melbourne, via Adelaide, to be greeted by newspaper headlines yelling “GET OUT COCKER!” Five days later he told his audience: “In five years marijuana will be legalised in Australia, and the same cat who is trying to throw us out now will be smoking it himself.” In return, his fans refused to let him go until he’d performed a triumphant Cry Me A River.

The very same evening, however, the singer was arrested after an alleged brawl with his girlfriend in the foyer of Melbourne’s Chateau Commodore hotel. He was held overnight on charges of assault and resisting arrest. This time, immigration minister Jim Forbes told him he had four hours to leave the country. Concerts were cancelled.

It caused a massive public outcry, but the view of then prime minister William McMahon was that the offended were all Labor voters anyway. Forbes’ own daughter Emma – then aged 17 – saw it somewhat differently. “Like any self-obsessed teenager, it’s probably the only thing I remember about my father’s political career,” she recalls, four decades on, to Guardian Australia. “I was so mortified that my dad had done this.”

The tour’s promoter Harry M Miller wrote in his 1983 biography My Story: “We had to cancel concerts in Brisbane and Perth. Prodded by a deportation order, Joe flew home. His legal transgressions could not be excused, but he had the misfortune to be in Australia when the conservative knee-jerk was lethal and the federal government of the time was reacting to an electorate disillusioned with its political performance.”

Joe Cocker performing at Sydney’s Enmore Theatre in 2002. Photograph: AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Despite all the furore, Cocker returned 11 more times to tour Australia – a country that clearly loves his down-to-earth bluesy demeanour – and even got rehabilitated into the establishment, when his version of Unchain My Heart was used in the Howard government’s 2000 campaign for the goods and services tax.

For this, Cocker got paid $169,000. Sounds a lot? Perhaps not, when taking stock of the US tours that were cancelled as a result of the Australian drugs debacle – and the fact the 1970s were mostly a write-off for Cocker, ravaged by alcohol and drugs and the burnout of success.

“The Australians actually owned up that they set us up,” Cocker told the Guardian’s Michael Hann in a 2013 interview. “Somebody wrote a book a few years ago saying it was a government thing, an election thing – we were just used as guinea pigs. But at the time it was real scary to be down in Australia. You didn’t have that communication thing you do nowadays.”

And for what it’s worth, Emma confirms that there is some regret on the part of her father for these events past.

Rest in peace, Joe.

 

I still remember that image on the front pages of the papers in N.S.W, ray. Joe being 'escorted' by two detectives. Barefoot with maybe a t shirt and a pair of pants. What an embarrassment.

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5 hours ago, mrbuzzardstubble said:

I still remember that image on the front pages of the papers in N.S.W, ray. Joe being 'escorted' by two detectives. Barefoot with maybe a t shirt and a pair of pants. What an embarrassment.

yeah i remember that as well,poor young joe used as a scapegoat for all the old 👴 cronies,well up there's as he went on to be bigger and better in later years and made some great albums,check out sheffield steel,it rocks,
still luv ya joe.

joe.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 14/12/2020 at 7:13 AM, ray4410 said:

a concert i will never forget(well most of it)the mad dogs +englishman tour australia 1972,when joe came out on stage holding a large can of beer he rambled off a few expletive's about the australian government and then tried to sing,he was so pissed and stoned it was pathetic to watch,he stumbled to the back of the stage trying to get out but behind the curtain backdrop was only a brick wall,this was festival hall in melbourne,he went and sat in one of the base bins until he was helped off stage,the band played on for what seemed forever then joe came back on stage,hair soaking wet and let it rip the place went wild and so did joe,unbelievable show from joe and what a band,have seen him several times when he came back to oz never disappointed always great shows,he is sadly missed.

n reality, it was a storm in a teacup – similar to the furore that had surrounded the Rolling Stones in Britain a few years earlier, when a famous 1967 editorial in the Times accused the judiciary system of “breaking a butterfly on a wheel” in its sentencing of Jagger to three months in jail for the possession of four tablets of amphetamine sulphate.

Cocker believed the Australian federal government needed to distract a populace disillusioned with its awful electoral performance, and these “uncouth, dirty-haired, sloppily dressed, show business freaks” served as a handy scapegoat.

Cocker continued his tour in Melbourne, via Adelaide, to be greeted by newspaper headlines yelling “GET OUT COCKER!” Five days later he told his audience: “In five years marijuana will be legalised in Australia, and the same cat who is trying to throw us out now will be smoking it himself.” In return, his fans refused to let him go until he’d performed a triumphant Cry Me A River.

The very same evening, however, the singer was arrested after an alleged brawl with his girlfriend in the foyer of Melbourne’s Chateau Commodore hotel. He was held overnight on charges of assault and resisting arrest. This time, immigration minister Jim Forbes told him he had four hours to leave the country. Concerts were cancelled.

It caused a massive public outcry, but the view of then prime minister William McMahon was that the offended were all Labor voters anyway. Forbes’ own daughter Emma – then aged 17 – saw it somewhat differently. “Like any self-obsessed teenager, it’s probably the only thing I remember about my father’s political career,” she recalls, four decades on, to Guardian Australia. “I was so mortified that my dad had done this.”

The tour’s promoter Harry M Miller wrote in his 1983 biography My Story: “We had to cancel concerts in Brisbane and Perth. Prodded by a deportation order, Joe flew home. His legal transgressions could not be excused, but he had the misfortune to be in Australia when the conservative knee-jerk was lethal and the federal government of the time was reacting to an electorate disillusioned with its political performance.”

Joe Cocker performing at Sydney’s Enmore Theatre in 2002. Photograph: AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Despite all the furore, Cocker returned 11 more times to tour Australia – a country that clearly loves his down-to-earth bluesy demeanour – and even got rehabilitated into the establishment, when his version of Unchain My Heart was used in the Howard government’s 2000 campaign for the goods and services tax.

For this, Cocker got paid $169,000. Sounds a lot? Perhaps not, when taking stock of the US tours that were cancelled as a result of the Australian drugs debacle – and the fact the 1970s were mostly a write-off for Cocker, ravaged by alcohol and drugs and the burnout of success.

“The Australians actually owned up that they set us up,” Cocker told the Guardian’s Michael Hann in a 2013 interview. “Somebody wrote a book a few years ago saying it was a government thing, an election thing – we were just used as guinea pigs. But at the time it was real scary to be down in Australia. You didn’t have that communication thing you do nowadays.”

And for what it’s worth, Emma confirms that there is some regret on the part of her father for these events past.

Rest in peace, Joe.

 

I have vivid memories of this concert, as it was my very first big-name concert.  At the time I was in lower-2ndary school with very conservative parents.  I didn't think they would let me go, but they agreed.  I was surprised, as their belief system was so distorted that they would think that I would return a heroin addict if I sat beside someone who had smoked a joint.  Living in a rural area required us to buy tickets via the mail, I made sure to send off as soon as sales were announced to get good seats.  I was getting concerned as the concert date got closer and closer, as the tickets hadn't arrived and it had been about 8 weeks since the cheque had been posted.  They finally turned up a couple of days beforehand. 

 

The controversy did not make me happy, as it was reinforcing my parents distorted stereotypes.  It was magnified by the tabloid press (The Sun) and tabloid TV (A Current Affair).  I thought I would never get to see another concert again.  Cocker's Melbourne concerts were for the Friday (my tickets) and Saturday nights.  Due to his deportation requiring him to be out of the country by midnight Friday night, the Friday concert started early, so he could do another performance for those with the Saturday tickets before being whisked off to the airport to leave the country. 

 

When the usher showed me to my seat I realised why the tickets took so long to arrive.  My seat was in the back corner - two rows from the back wall, three seats away from the corner.  They had obviously put mail-order tickets aside so they could sell better seats for over-the-counter sales. 

 

Cocker wasn't with the Mad Dogs and Englishmen band - that was the US tour several years prior.  We got the Grease Band.  It wasn't economical to tour Australia with a big band.  I recall the performance was ordinary.  Cocker was obviously tired and exhausted from the run-in's with the police and media.  He was also probably conserving what little energy he had for the second performance (for those who had tickets from the Sat. gig).  I recall the irony of his current single - "and it's High Time We Went". 

 

I saw him again in the 1990.  This time I think at Melb's Hamer Hall.  He had a much bigger, and better band, and better acoustics than our old boxing hall.  He delivered a polished performance that night.  I was grateful he - and the Australian police - didn't bear grudges from that fateful tour in the 1970's. 

 

 

 

 

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The B52's

1980's.  Melbourne, Festival Hall. 

 

The first concert for The B52's sold out very quickly.  I had a strategy, to wait for a second concert to be announced, so I'm more likely to get better seats, and all audio problems are likely to have been resolved in the preceding performance.  So I jumped in when the second concert was announced.  Reviews were great for the first concert, so I arrived the next day with high expectations. 

 

First thing I noticed was it was open-floor dance plan.  I should have thought of that, the B52's would get a crowd on their feet easily.  Second thing I noticed was that there were only about 100 people in the audience.  The band's fanbase was big enough to sell out one concert only.  And this 100 looked tiny in a hall designed to accommodate 1,000's. 

 

Given this situation, the band could still have come out and given a fantastic performance, to really give the small audience value for money and something to talk about.  However, they took a different approach.  They were pissed off that they had to do a gig to such a small audience, and went through the motions of their set.  No attempt to hide this from the audience. 

 

Now the audience took advantage of the fact that it was an intimate performance.  All were gathered around the stage, and had the opportunity to interact with the band.  It would have been the perfect opportunity for the band to interact, however, they didn't want to have anything to do with the audience.  They ignored the many well-intentioned attempts to communicate with them, and remained aloof and peeved. 

 

Over the course of the gig this started to annoy the audience - and quite rightly, in my opinion.  So towards the latter part of the gig some in the audience started yelling things at the band, trying to get some - any - recognition that the audience existed.  Someone yelled at the band "What brand of toothpaste do you use?!".  This finally brought the first - and only - reply from the band - "Does it really matter?".   They went through the charade of an encore, and left. 

 

I do have some sympathy for the band, they probably lost money on the night, and it would have been a let-down for them.  They also probably thought that Melbourne was on the other side of the world, and not doing a good gig wouldn't affect their career, and word of it wouldn't get out.  They didn't know the internet would make the world a smaller and more connected place, and those in the audience wouldn't forget. 

 

 

 

 

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Hundreds of gigs were excellent - particular faves were WISHBONE ASH, JETHRO TULL, PROCAL HARUM, RUSH, U.F.O, YES, NEIL YOUNG, CLASH, GRACE JONES, KINKS, RICKIE LEE JONES, STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN, URIAH HEEP etc.

Seldom heard an Aussie  or kiwi band)artist who did not deliver.

Worst - take a bow Frank Zappa and The Mother's at Festival Hall. Exhibiting apparent disinterest and distain for the audience, I will never forget the sight of dozens of people streaming out from the 30 minute mark. I lasted 50 minutes before adjourning to join the growing crowd in Dudley Street for a debrief/ doobie before heading for the tram. It must have been a little sobering for Frank as the next concert, in Sydney, was recorded and eventually released as ' FZ/ OZ' - generally well regarded. 

Was anyone at this concert who has a happier memory them me?

Billy

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  • 4 weeks later...

Great rock n roll bands I’ve seen in un rock n roll places

Blondie

from CBGBs to downtown Lismore

Johnny Thunders 

A real live New York Doll In Coolangatta 

The Go Betweens

In Surfers Paradise the dullest ugliest place I’ve ever been

Grant down on the ground begging over and over I gotta know is my apology accepted

Some nutter shouting to play rawk n roll !

Should have been quarantined

the world would be a less dumb place😀

Chris Wilson

In Surfers Paradise started with 50 odd people or so and ended with a private show for just the 4 of us

The Ramones one of the greatest rock n roll bands ever 

At midday in San Francisco hiding from the sun behind sunglasses 

A 40 minute blast😀

 

 

 

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