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Ordered a set of 125mm orbital sander pads, need a 2000 grit to wet polish the polyurethane.  comes in 80-3000 grit, 8 pieces each.  Should make general sanding much faster.

 

Work order ahead (getting my thoughts down in writing):

1. Drill holes in bracing panels

2. Cut rebates for horizontal bracings in side panels.

3. Glue boxes.  I have only a rough idea how i'm going to do this, seems like i need to glue, top/bottom, sides and braces in 1 go, faaarrrkk.  Troels said he starts with sides and bracings, but then i'm worried that the top and bottom wont be a good fit, and if i'm clamping them on too without glue just to ensure they're straight, then i may as well be gluing.  Also need to glue in felt, tweeter enclosure, and speaker wires for mid and tweeter (sealing holes once run through).  The Sika PVA glue i purchased (couldn't find any titebond 3) says it starts to dry in 10 minutes, i wont have a lot of time to get the boxes together.  this part's concerning me.

4. Test front baffle fitment, adjust if needed.

5. Construct grill frames.

6. Drill grill frame and front baffle for grill plugs and driver holes.  drill rear baffle for binding posts.

7. Dye front baffles and poly then polish.  spray rear baffles matte black.

8. Vinyl sides, top and bottom.

8. Glue rear and front baffles.

9. Plug and play baby!

 

I can't drill for the front grill frames, nor the driver holes until i've glued the boxes together, i need to check front baffle fitment once they're glued in case the front baffles need trimming.  Would be crap to end up with the drivers and grills off centre due to a need to trim.  I have next Friday off and am going to take next Thursday afternoon too.  Once the boxes are glued together, i can bring them back to my aunt's empty apartment to finish off.  I need the orbital sander for the front baffles though, so i may bring them home to allow me to do a coat of poly a few times a day (aiming for 15 coats), then take them back to sand and polish.

I guess i can glue the front baffle in just using some felt, blocks and bricks for weight at home.  how much pressure do you put on with clams, would the weight of a few cinder blocks suffice?

 

Any comments/suggestions/corrections MUCH appreciated.

 

Thanks all!

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Woohoo!!   for reference, that’s a 60 inch TV.  It’s a bit difficult to get a perspective on that photo.  The entertainment unit is 2m wide.  

Howdy folks, ordered and paid yesterday for the tweeters, crossover components and various bits and pieces from Jantzen Audio, I went for the more basic kit with fabric tweeters and the lower (but sti

Well, the wood screws provided appear to be a slightly narrower head diameter than the holes on the 15" woofer.  Enough to have a listen, but a couple have just screwed straight through flush on the w

Good to see your thoughts - surely helpful for other builders to follow.

 

Without giving "Brian's entire theory on bracing", I'd still like to reiterate a wish to see you leave more weight in the bracing. Simply put, this means to make the holes a little smaller, and stay away from the edges more.

 

The short reason is that bracing adds both mass and stiffness, so having more mass against the box walls is good, and having more substance in the strut parts reduces the possibility of the struts themselves resonating. There's no downside to this - there's enough holes to allow free air movement.

 

If you're going to all the trouble that this bracing causes, you might as well maximize its effectiveness.

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With routing the holes, it looks like you're doing the full depth in one cut? I can only see one slight burn mark, but if so, this puts a lot of strain on the tools, and may explain why you broke a bit.

 

I use the depth gauges a lot, cutting less than 1 mm in the 1st round, then only 2-3 mm in each following cut. Staying sensitive to the machine struggling, never letting the revs drop.

 

The end of the last cut is the moment of terror, where the centre piece is no longer holding the tool in place. It's good to stay ultra still at that moment, or move slightly towards the inside, until the router stops spinning.

 

Routing the driver holes is much more critical of course, so it's good to have all the practice with the bracing. Troels talks about only doing about 0.2 mm (!) in the first cut, sanding the edge, then progressively going deeper.

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Hi Brian, thanks (as always :) ) for the comments. 

 

I did give this some thought, and ended up back at wanting to stick as closely to Troels' plans as possible.

Even with the large cutouts, the bracing panels are extremely stiff, hopefully no unwanted resonances!

 

Aris has kindly offered to run through with me on the phone how he glued them, i should have more confidence in how to do it after discussing with him.

 

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Yes i did the entire depth in 1 go. I'll try going at it in a more progressive way like you've described.

I imagine i'll spend a bit of time sanding the edge of  the circles cut for the drivers, no matter how good i get at it they're unlikely to be perfect.

 

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You might not need them with the Aris Method, but if buying, make sure the straps are long enough!

 

With the glue thing - if you need more time, do consider epoxy. You get up to an hour. Last time I hit this problem I had to fit 10 major pieces together in one sitting, so was very glad of it.

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If you plan on covering the out side face with either paint, vinyl or a veneer screwing all the joints together works well. Gives good clamping for the glue and helps locate panels. I would advice removing screws and filing with bog once all the glue joints are set. 
 

 

325998DC-CA4B-43A6-BB95-3E39ADAE9DD6.thumb.png.b3802d1adf88149fcb27c0a287b47f54.png

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Thanks, I tested the Sikabond PVA glue today and was able to work it for about 15 minutes, I think it’ll be ok.  I reckon it’s unlikely I’ll need longer than that to get the panels clamped in place.  

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2 more Thursday 3hr sessions, 2hrs tonight and 4-5hrs this Friday to go until i wrap up at the workshop.  I can probably squeeze in 2hrs next Monday too.  This is tight!

 

I need to finish the bracing holes tonight, it'll take me 2hrs for sure.

Thursday: bracing rebates and commence gluing cabinets.  Cut driver holes and port holes in front baffles (instructor is back Thursday and will bring his router jig).  Cut and glue tweeter box. (remember to take a tweeter, mid and bass drivers + ports for measurements)

Friday: Construct grill frames first thing, glue them, then drill front baffles for grill frame plugs after they dry.  Continue gluing cabinets.  Drill bottom panel for castors IF they arrive by then.  Take front baffles home to dye and poly at my aunts. 

Monday: Continue gluing cabinets if needed.

Thursday: Bring front baffles to workshop to finish the poly with their orbital sander.  Take everything home, cabs get a coat or two of poly before vinyl wrap.  How do i attach the mesh cloth to the speaker grills, looks like some kind of woodworking staple gets used.  I have a feeling the cloth will take a while to attach, i may need to get this done at the workshop if they have a woodworking stapler.

 

I'm going to need another full day in the workshop I reckon, until now i've failed to complete all tasks on my nightly lists.  Once i've the glued cabinets together i can take them back home to do the vinyl, front baffles glued in, and driver installation .  Probably take a week after the workshop finishes to complete the build.

 

The Sikabond glue is strong, i tested it on Saturday and this morning it's rock solid.

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On 03/12/2020 at 11:25 AM, Janus77 said:

Updated

 

26B64B14-083A-4631-876A-1F397EF17736.jpeg

 

Brian you'll be pleased to know i've decided to extend the grills down below the port holes.  It will look uneven if i end them above, as there isn't room to have equal spacing above and below the port holes.  There's 6cm from the bottom of the port hole to the bottom of the cabinet, less 10mm or so for the leading edge of the bottom panel, if i cut the bottom spar of the grill frame slightly narrower (say 25mm), i'll have 25mm of red showing at the bottom when the grill frames are on..

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I think it'd look good either way - I like the red.

 

But practically, with (kids and other) creatures, it's good to cover the vents. (And best not to tempt certain Forum members into entertaining any connection of vents and dinosaurs 🙂).

 

My concern would be more about bowing of the grill frames - the longer you make them, the more they can be be pulled in by the cloth tension. It's a pity the tweeter's in the middle: the tweeter sound is most likely to be affected badly by grill frames in close proximity, but it's where the frames need to be widest in section, unless you can put a small strut or 2 across as compression members, and keep the grille frames relatively small.

 

Maybe struts could be cut from those fibreglass tent poles, or garden stakes? (Stiff, weighty, non-resonant, easy to just drill into your frame, and could stop the twisting force).

 

 

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16 minutes ago, BioBrian said:

I think it'd look good either way - I like the red.

 

But practically, with (kids and other) creatures, it's good to cover the vents. (And best not to tempt certain Forum members into entertaining any connection of vents and dinosaurs 🙂).

 

My concern would be more about bowing of the grill frames - the longer you make them, the more they can be be pulled in by the cloth tension. It's a pity the tweeter's in the middle: the tweeter sound is most likely to be affected badly by grill frames in close proximity, but it's where the frames need to be widest in section, unless you can put a small strut or 2 across as compression members, and keep the grille frames relatively small.

 

Maybe struts could be cut from those fibreglass tent poles, or garden stakes? (Stiff, weighty, non-resonant, easy to just drill into your frame, and could stop the twisting force).

 

 

The frames will be 40mm wide 18mm birch sides and top, bottom i might cut slightly narrower, should hopefully be wide enough to avoid bowing.  When attached (most of the time), they'll be held from bowing by the plugs.  See how it goes :).  If no luck i might try a fibreglass tent pole as you suggest across the top line of the bass driver to hold the side frames from bowing in.

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OK, it all depends on the lightness and tightness of the grill cloth, but 40 mm with a 45 degree chamfer and rounded corners is pretty light-on, over that large distance.

 

The dowel or pole idea won't be possible to fit after the cloth is fixed.

 

Maybe cut a side piece, and do a bending test?

 

Another possibility is cutting them in a slight curve - "pre-stressed", so the cloth makes them straight again. (And you could still be "in by Christmas"!).

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Thanks Brian i'll do some testing before attaching the cloth.  The ply seems pretty strong generally with the cross grain lamination.

I'm pretty sure i have some folding tent poles from an old hiking tent which bit the dust if needed for additional support.

Gluing in some triangular corner supports might also help i guess, i could fit them to the bottom part of the frame where there's more room and not close to the tweeter.

Few options anyway :)

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On 04/12/2020 at 3:22 PM, Janus77 said:

Buying a couple of these is quite appealing

 

 

strap clamp.jpg


Packing tape works well as it is stretchy, less expensive too. I’d just be careful of using it on any prefinished surfaces though.

 

 

Re the grille cloth, if there is enough room, rout a thin channel around the perimeter of the grill on the inside and use fly wire spline. The spline also means it is easy to redo if needed.

 

(reaches over to subwoofer next to seat...)

FF0FF2D0-A315-4206-8C4D-16AC5E0E83F9.thumb.jpeg.bf082705489561f15a04dc21cdcb3879.jpeg
 

oh, and I do use currently use fly wire for my grille cloth... kids make it a necessity 🙂

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True to form, I didn’t manage to cut all the holes, but I gave it a red hot go!   Not too many holes left, feeling pretty handy with the router.  
 

broke another bit I think I was using too small a bit, better off with the largest diameter.  

the vertical B braces, I drilled the centre hole for each circle, and then it was time to pack up.  

 

3601BBCE-649E-4553-8FEF-E493D0707088.jpeg

E5F90515-B6AD-4192-BBBC-0E6C552B0E86.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Sub Sonic said:


Packing tape works well as it is stretchy, less expensive too. I’d just be careful of using it on any prefinished surfaces though.

 

 

Re the grille cloth, if there is enough room, rout a thin channel around the perimeter of the grill on the inside and use fly wire spline. The spline also means it is easy to redo if needed.

 

(reaches over to subwoofer next to seat...)

FF0FF2D0-A315-4206-8C4D-16AC5E0E83F9.thumb.jpeg.bf082705489561f15a04dc21cdcb3879.jpeg
 

oh, and I do use currently use fly wire for my grille cloth... kids make it a necessity 🙂

That looks like an excellent solution!

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Castors and orbital sander pads arrived.  

 

Any advice what sort of screws to use to attach the castors, what gauge?  The panel's 24mm thick, if i get a 3-4mm wood screw that goes in 20mm, will that be enough, or should i glue in an extra piece of wood in each corner to drill a longer screw into?

The vertical B braces, one of them bowed slightly, I’ve clamped them together until Thursday when I’m back in the workshop, hopefully it straightens out.   Otherwise I guess I can suspend it by each end and leave a weight on top to try and straighten it out.  

 

153C812E-0C61-4D3F-973D-D9A6054DF49A.jpeg

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I'd use at 10 ga self-tappers as a minimum. Bunnings have had 12 ga, which would be preferable. Or longer 10 ga, if you use backing pieces.

 

You lose 2 mm of length going through the castor plate, and another 3 or 4 as the end tapers, so I'd go with  minimum 25 mm long.

 

The problem is  that you'd have to drill right through, so if you ever lose a screw or replace them and forget, you'll have air holes. That would be my first reason for the backing pieces - so you don't have to drill right through. (Not to mention that you might want more attractive feet at some stage).

 

BTW I've found 12 ga screws just right for some woofer mounting. But only silver - always end up having to paint the ends, not a huge drama.

 

The warping sounds completely normal to me - that's the real world! Pity it's such a vital component though, one that you'd want to rely on to make everything nice and square. Rebates would tame it - I doubt clamping it straight overnight will help. In the finish it will be "pre-stressed" and hold your box tighter and stiffer, if that helps 🙃.

 

Having a super-flat bench for the glue-up will be even more critical.

 

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Thanks Brian, i'll do some backing pieces in 18mm ply for the castors.  In reality they wont need to be large, only the screw on the inside will need it as the others will all screw into the side panel and front baffle.  I'll want the castors right in the corners for best stability. 

I'll ensure i pre drill so i don't split the wood.

 

Thursday I'll finish remaining bracing holes and cut the rebates.  I might take a few hours off so i can log 5hrs - hopefully that'll allow me to start gluing too.  Then Friday i can cut driver holes, construct the grill frames, and drill the front rebates for the grill clip sockets and commence gluing.  that'll allow me to take the front baffles home to dye and poly for the week leading up to Thursday's final class. 

If i'm short on time coming into next week, i'll try and take Tuesday or Wednesday off work.

 

I had a proper sweat going last night, mad scramble at this point!

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Janus77 said:

I'll ensure i pre drill so i don't split the wood.

 

Definitely! "Self -tapping" is very misleading. I'm always surprised at how large the pilot holes need to be. It should be comfortable to screw them in by hand.

 

You've set a blistering pace for this build - don't know how you do it! I'd need a fresh start for the first gluing session, just the right amount of time after the morning espresso, phone off, all planets aligning, etc etc. There's a lot concentrated into that moment.

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Just realized my son has an orthodontist appointment Friday at 11am (i might need to sell the speakers to fund this one ;) ), so Friday is likely to be only 2-3hrs or so in the workshop.  Dangit.  I also need to go and collect a drum kit Friday morning.  Bah, life getting in the way!

 

Ona Coffee have opened a cafe around the corner from the workshop, they're from the ACT.  The owner was the world barista champion 8-10 years ago from memory.  Very nice coffee to drink while i build :)

 

The blistering pace is fueled by 5-6 days in between each workshop session planning my next visit, has resulted in a very clear vision of what to do each time.  If i were in the workshop more often i'd probably have made more mistakes or just taken a lot longer thinking and planning instead of cutting.  Few practice folds of the vinyl on corners has yielded good results, i'm fairly hopeful/confident the speakers are going to be reasonably well finished.  Hoping!

 

 

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3 hours ago, Janus77 said:

Castors and orbital sander pads arrived.  

 

Any advice what sort of screws to use to attach the castors, what gauge?  The panel's 24mm thick, if i get a 3-4mm wood screw that goes in 20mm, will that be enough, or should i glue in an extra piece of wood in each corner to drill a longer screw into?

The vertical B braces, one of them bowed slightly, I’ve clamped them together until Thursday when I’m back in the workshop, hopefully it straightens out.   Otherwise I guess I can suspend it by each end and leave a weight on top to try and straighten it out.  

 

153C812E-0C61-4D3F-973D-D9A6054DF49A.jpeg


I got these when I was thinking of using castors. 

Aris

 

B78B710B-84BA-4640-A9B6-478E3B15E416.jpeg

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On discussion with Aris, have come up with the following glue plan:

1. Glue a T with one side panel lying down, and the large vertical brace sitting up perpendicular.  I'll glue in 1 or 2 of the horizontal braces to ensure it's square - using the horizontal panel which seals the mid box to ensure it's butted up firmly in line with the front baffle rebates so that the mid box gets a good seal when the front baffle goes on.

2. Glue remaining horizontal braces in.

3. Glue opposing side panel on.

4. Glue top and bottom panels.

 

From here i can take the cabinets home to finish them.  I'll glue the rear panel on first, i think i'll leave the felt off until after it's glued, then i'll add some additional PVA glue around all internal seams for the mid box and inside of exterior panels to ensure it's sealed up nicely.  Then once dried i glue in felt.  Will remember to drill and run the driver wires before felt (per Aris advice).

 

Feeling much more confident after our discussion, thanks Aris.

 

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List of tasks up to completion, anyone notice anything missing?

image.png.7bbcc685d09105ec497b326edc58603c.png

 

I'm starting to think i can see the finish line on the build.

 

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1 hour ago, Janus77 said:

I'm starting to think i can see the finish line on the build.

 

 

Always an exciting time. Plenty of hours left but being so close is its own motivation 

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Hi Hugh,

1/4" rounding bit to bracing holes? (One of the most quick and satisfying jobs, but not sure you have enough wood left in some).

Chamfering of inside of baffle for mid-driver!

Chamfering inside grill frame, also at 45 degrees. (Drill for strut first, if doing that).

Fitting of tweeter box? Need front baffle in temporarily, to align.

Cross off the Paradigm one - everyone'll be ordering plywood to build some of these 🤣.

Also, I'd suggest rounding the vents a little after fitting - even a tiny bit would help. Feels good, looks nice, and might help prevent choofing at extreme excursion.

I'd use a dry fit of top and bottom panels at the moment you glue the 2nd side to the braces, so you can sleep well over alignment for later.

Going well!

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Thanks Brian, all good pick ups!

 

I brought the bracings home on Monday and have sanded them so they’re pretty smooth.  
Do the 1/4# rounded edges have any impact on speaker performance?  I guess it marginally increases volume.   I think I can round most of them (maybe leave a few spots where the cuts are close.  
I know your advice was to think about leaving more mass in the braces, they’re definitely not strong torsionally now, however they remain strong for any push or pull along the length or breadth, which to my mind is the main function.   I think they’ll still work well.  Also looking at Troels construction pics, some of his 1/4# rounded edges were so close the thickness of the plywood was reduced between the circles.. (of course he didn’t build them to live with forever)

 

thanks again,

 

I spent some time going over your build threads today, quite a set up! did you pull apart the DTWQTDDQT (sorry can never remember the acronym) to build the pyramid looking speakers?

 

Ive started daydreaming about building one of the bottlehead SET amps next.  the 300b looks pretty awesome, 8 watts would be unbearably loud at 96db efficiency.  
need to see this project through first though, I don’t see myself spending any more money on hifi equipment for a while after this.  

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1 hour ago, Janus77 said:

 

great job btw. I have been enjoying following your project. 

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2 hours ago, Janus77 said:

Do the 1/4# rounded edges have any impact on speaker performance?

 

TBH, no. But it takes all the daggy edges off in a couple of seconds, and as I said, it's very fulfilling. The router's not nearly as frightening, doing such an easy task.

 

2 hours ago, Janus77 said:

looking at Troels construction pics, some of his 1/4# rounded edges were so close the thickness of the plywood was reduced between the circles..

 

My thoughts, too. And very easy to change, but it's history now, unless you want to do them again, haha

 

2 hours ago, Janus77 said:

I spent some time going over your build threads today

 

You do have a lot of stamina!

 

No, my DTQWT-12s are intact - I just borrowed the 8" drivers for a month or two. They (I call them DTs when feeling lazy) are as Troels designed, except for using 24 mm ply in outer parts, as you did. Even the decorative baffle side fillet angles are exactly to his measurements. They're my main house speakers.

 

The pyramids have one pair of large woofers, and I have 2 pairs of upper lots now, needing more woofers to match. Hard to know when to stop in this game.

 

3 hours ago, Janus77 said:

Ive started daydreaming about building one of the bottlehead SET amps next.  the 300b looks pretty awesome, 8 watts would be unbearably loud at 96db efficiency.  

 

I don't believe 8 Watts would be anything like enough for your speakers. If Troels says 400 W, we should "sit up and take notice", though that's more what they can take, rather than what listeners can take.

 

I'm sure I'm not the only one extrapolating how insightful and saintly your wife is, we love her a lot, after her comment about needing an amplifier after all this. I was thinking a nice Luxman L-509x would integrate seamlessly with these speakers, and I'm sure there'd be dozens queueing up to help you make other choices. I'm sure she'll support how important it all is, when she's in a swoon over your amazing achievement. So we don't want any more of this unprecedented nonsense about 

 

3 hours ago, Janus77 said:

I don’t see myself spending any more money on hifi equipment for a while after this.

 

Please consider our needs 🤪😉😅

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Great post Brian, made me chuckle.

 

Back to the workshop tonight!  Goals:

1. Finish drilling all bracing holes, 1/4 inch rounding bit for clean finish.

2. Cut rebates into side panels (will use the table saw for this - thinking i set limits with the parallel rip fence, and the stop on the perpendicular one.  definitely doing test cuts first!)

3. Cut driver rebates, holes and port holes.

 

That's the minimum I hope to get done, and probably all i'll get done based on past sessions.

If i complete steps 1-3, i'll work on constructing the grill frames, so they're ready to drill on Friday.

I'll give it some more thought, maybe i change item 3 to be construction of the grill frames - i definitely need them drilled for the front baffles tomorrow.  If i don't get them glued tonight i could be in trouble though i guess at a pinch i can clamp each frame length onto the front of the mocked up boxes and drill them, then glue them later.

 

7-8hrs workshop time between tonight and tomorrow, and probably 2hrs Monday and then the final session on Thursday.  I need the front baffles drilled for grill frames and drivers to take home tomorrow, as i have to bring them back to the workshop to use the orbital sander to finish the poly, so this bit's probably most critical to get done - i'll need 5 days to get the coats of poly on (3 per day and some cure time).  Do I need the sides glued as a minimum in order to dry fit them for drilling?  So tight for time!

 

I reckon the wood screws I received from Jantzen will probably do for the castors too, they're about 25-30mm, 4 per castor they should be strong enough - actually just worked out i wont have enough (50 in the pack), there's a box of odd assorted wood screws at the workshop, i'll figure something out.

 

Fun fun, leaving work at 3pm today, that'll give me a solid 5hrs, which i know will fly by!

 

Another pair built: http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/Faital-3WC-15_Hans-Kristian.htm

 

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Thanks for your forgiveness!

 

I worry about you losing too much time over the grills - would rather see 'all stops out' on the box build. Would it not be possible to finish the boxes - poly, polish and vinyl - and drill for the grills last, at home? (If the alignment didn't work out, how do you correct the hole placement?). I don't know how you're fixing them, but imagine it being easier to do baffle surfaces without the holes filling up and needing re-drilling, etc. (??)

 

Not sure what you mean about doing the rebates on the table saw. Troels has found an efficient way that suits him, but we were talking about 18 mm wide slots? If these can't be done in one cut, I'd rethink the need for them.

 

For brace B you could set the router fence/guide to run off say the back edge of all 4 sides and 4 ends; use an 18 mm bit, and they're all identical.

 

For the shelf brace slots, you could maybe clamp all 4 side pieces together (inner side up), clamp something from that steel rack across the lot, and run the router along that.

 

Just chucking in some ideas again - sure you'll get there fine. But simple is more reliable; I've tried cutting rebates with a saw, and it wasn't fun.

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17 minutes ago, BioBrian said:

Thanks for your forgiveness!

 

I worry about you losing too much time over the grills - would rather see 'all stops out' on the box build. Would it not be possible to finish the boxes - poly, polish and vinyl - and drill for the grills last, at home? (If the alignment didn't work out, how do you correct the hole placement?). I don't know how you're fixing them, but imagine it being easier to do baffle surfaces without the holes filling up and needing re-drilling, etc. (??)

 

Not sure what you mean about doing the rebates on the table saw. Troels has found an efficient way that suits him, but we were talking about 18 mm wide slots? If these can't be done in one cut, I'd rethink the need for them.

 

For brace B you could set the router fence/guide to run off say the back edge of all 4 sides and 4 ends; use an 18 mm bit, and they're all identical.

 

For the shelf brace slots, you could maybe clamp all 4 side pieces together (inner side up), clamp something from that steel rack across the lot, and run the router along that.

 

Just chucking in some ideas again - sure you'll get there fine. But simple is more reliable; I've tried cutting rebates with a saw, and it wasn't fun.

 

Issue with the router table is the table and guide are too small for the panels i need to rebate.  I like your idea of clamping all in line across the table with a guide rail and using the hand router.  I'm not sure if i have an 18mm bit though, will check.  i'm also a bit concerned the hand router depth guides can drift a bit, i was getting that cutting the bracing holes.

 

i'd hate to damage the front baffle finish drilling through the poly, that's why i want to do it first.  You might be right though, given the time frame it's a compromise i may have to make.  see how much i get done today.

 

Thanks for the comments as always. 

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13 hours ago, PKay said:

 

great job btw. I have been enjoying following your project. 

 

Thanks PKay, i'm following your advice in using fine steel wool between coats of poly, worked a treat on the test piece.

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8 minutes ago, Janus77 said:

i'm also a bit concerned the hand router depth guides can drift a bit

 

Doesn't your router have a depth clamp lever on the side? This should lock it. The depth stops are only a rough guide (my Makita looks very similar to the one you're using). Do the test runs on scrap to get the depth you want, then do all cuts to that. (No plunging).

 

I thought you might say that about the guides being too small...   You could make up a guide, eg a piece of ply of the right width (and very parallel), with an edge that can sit over the edge of each panel. Just need the measurement from (any) guide to the edge of cut by testing, then all's the same for the rest of the build.

 

My router has holes for twin 12 mm rods which clamp in - it just might be time-effective to make a fence guide using these, if the bits are just over there on the wall.

 

$40? for an 18 mm bit is a good investment I reckon - and get the 1/2" shank version if your router takes them natively - much stronger for about the same $.

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