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Hey everyone. 

I am in the market for an entertainment unit to house a very deep receiver (470 ish mm), game console, amp  as well as a center speaker. The main issue I have is that the cabinet cannot be too wide (roughly 170cm max.) From what I have seen there is basically nothing on the market thats even close to 47cm deep at this width ( ideally more as I need room for cables and proper ventilation). Can anyone recommend any retailers that might meet these specs? Trying to avoid custom but if you know anyone please drop a recommendation! I am Melbourne-based. 

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5 hours ago, BrokeEnthusiast said:

Hey everyone. 

I am in the market for an entertainment unit to house a very deep receiver (470 ish mm), game console, amp  as well as a center speaker. The main issue I have is that the cabinet cannot be too wide (roughly 170cm max.) From what I have seen there is basically nothing on the market thats even close to 47cm deep at this width ( ideally more as I need room for cables and proper ventilation). Can anyone recommend any retailers that might meet these specs? Trying to avoid custom but if you know anyone please drop a recommendation! I am Melbourne-based. 

I ran in to same issue of having to find an AV cabinet which was not too wide and not too tall as it was housing the center channel and few equipments.

 

I went with keeping the existing cabinet for center channel and moving the equipments in a corner on IKEA rack. 

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I did a similar thing, ie. used Bunnings 600mm wide 560 deap kitchen cabinets and doors, cut the back out for ventilation and skinned the sides and top in timber.

 

JDH

A4B8DA93-2723-460F-A978-A236413F6A3E.jpeg

C1B5232E-B167-486C-B561-6AD6766FCCC0.jpeg

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  • 1 month later...
12 hours ago, ericmiles said:

Can you recommend how to convert av to hdmi for N64?

There are some cheap converters available on Ebay although lots of them have some funky limitations.  Of the few I have tried some had serious audio conversion issues (lots of hissing noises instead of high frequencies etc).  Something like this from Amazon does the trick but isn't nice.

 

The one I was using for a while was a "Neoteck" AV CVBS to HDMI up scaler.  Was restricted to 1080p only and I was using it for a Laserdisc player, although I have stopped using it and gone back to using an S-Video cable direct to the TV.  Major problem with the Neoteck is that you have no way of adjusting the aspect ratio, so it was useless for my rubbish projector (for example) that doesn't have enough scaling modes to allow a proper wide screen view on a letterboxed laserdisc.  On the up side, the conversion quality was excellent and the analog audio conversion really good, much better than the cheaper versions of these dongles.

 

In the end, the two best converters I owned were either the TV directly, or an ancient Sony RDR-HXD780 DVD Recorder that has a fantastic scaling chip in it that works well with the projector, but I don't use it when using the TV.  Mostly that old warhorse is in the cupboard because I use it to grab DV tapes from camcorders as it has a firewire port and a great picture.

 

Some of the more expensive AVRs used to have great composite scaling capabilities but I never bought one, in retrospect I probably should 🙂

 

 

 

 

Edited by Old Man Rubber
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  • 2 weeks later...

A bit late, but I found the TITAN units from this distributor: Tauris

 

The 1200 and 1500 are 520mm deep and the 1800 and 2100 are 550mm deep. They are flat pack, but that also means I can buy the white one, and later on, I'll be replacing the top of the unit with a blond wood panel and veneering the sides and base to make it look similar to this (Ava 1800 Oak) unit.

 

P.S. It's not arriving until next week. I saw them at Harvey Norman's (they are no longer stocking them, so they're being cleared) and needed somethign to upgrade to which will do the same as our current, much modified, 1650mm dark wood cabinet.

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On 19/09/2020 at 8:30 PM, DrSK said:

$150 of timber at Bunnings, oil, paint and a few bricks sorted me out. Completely adjustable. 

Hi DrSK,

Absolutely loved it!

Would you mind sharing  the complete list of items needed to build this, including the tools. ?
I am very much interested in building something like this myself, but I have never tried my hand on carpentry before :( 

 

Thanks

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4 hours ago, nirmal1988 said:

Hi DrSK,

Absolutely loved it!

Would you mind sharing  the complete list of items needed to build this, including the tools. ?
I am very much interested in building something like this myself, but I have never tried my hand on carpentry before :( 

 

Thanks

What tools, it's timber panels stacked on top of bricks - no carpentry needed.

You can get everything at Bunnings and they will cut the panels to size if needed (at $1 per cut the last time I used them)

 

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6 hours ago, nirmal1988 said:

Hi DrSK,

Absolutely loved it!

Would you mind sharing  the complete list of items needed to build this, including the tools. ?
I am very much interested in building something like this myself, but I have never tried my hand on carpentry before :( 

 

Thanks

 

Thanks! 

 

No worries, here is are some details which assume no knowledge based on some of my extended family members.

 

Step 1, figure out how you'll get the cut sheets home from Bunnings. I have racks on my wagon which I spaced extra wide for my 2.1m lengths. 

 

Step 2, get Bunnings to cut the sheets to the finished sizes. Let them know they will be the finished edges. The sizes I needed were 3 of 2100mm by 405mm. I ended up with 4 as I needed 2 sheets to get the 3 shelves. My timber is 30mm thick. Also buy 120 grit sand paper and sanding block, black semi gloss enamel paint that cleans up in water, paint brush, untinted oil, masking tape. My bricks were under the house left over from when it was built in the 1970s. 

 

Step 3, grab some corrugated cardboard boxes from Bunnings, flatten and place on your racks to protect the timber. Once timber is on your car, use some more to protect the timber edges where the rope/straps puts pressure on the timber. You'll need 4 layers or so. 

 

Step 4, light sand to clean up any saw marks on cut sides using sanding block. Be very careful on the ends as you are end grain to the timber and it can split. Best to always sand towards the middle of the board, not an edge when end grain, otherwise always go with the grain. Then sort the edges (where it will go from timber to black finish), gently sand along length of edge to give about a 1mm radius so not sharp. 

 

Step 5, mask the top and bottom faces along the edges so black paint won't get onto the faces from the sides too much when you paint them. Stick about 40mm down and then pull about 600mm sections  tight and stick along edge. Pulling tight should give you a nice straight line. If you cut the tape, you want the next bit to line up perfectly. I overlap and on the bottom layer I have it back from the edge for the last 20mm and use the second top layer to create the masking to avoid a jagged line. 

 

Step 6, place board on some blocks etc, to raise off the floor so you can paint the whole edge. You'll need about 3 coats. When dry peel off tape. 

 

Step 7, some paint will have bled through. If dry, gently sand off the top and bottom surfaces. I then very gently ran the sanding block along the length of each edge at a very slight angle out of plane to the top and bottom surface. Ie just along the start of the 1mm radius. This creates a nice defined edge/line between the black and timber finish and deals with small bleeds. 

 

Step 8, you'll need about 3 coats of oil.

 

I'd recommend doing one shelf at a time. And you'll probably find the last one is the best one after the practice and is the one for the top shelf. 

Edited by DrSK
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9 hours ago, DrSK said:

 

Thanks! 

 

No worries, here is are some details which assume no knowledge based on some of my extended family members.

 

Step 1, figure out how you'll get the cut sheets home from Bunnings. I have racks on my wagon which I spaced extra wide for my 2.1m lengths. 

 

Step 2, get Bunnings to cut the sheets to the finished sizes. Let them know they will be the finished edges. The sizes I needed were 3 of 2100mm by 405mm. I ended up with 4 as I needed 2 sheets to get the 3 shelves. My timber is 30mm thick. Also buy 120 grit sand paper and sanding block, black semi gloss enamel paint that cleans up in water, paint brush, untinted oil, masking tape. My bricks were under the house left over from when it was built in the 1970s. 

 

Step 3, grab some corrugated cardboard boxes from Bunnings, flatten and place on your racks to protect the timber. Once timber is on your car, use some more to protect the timber edges where the rope/straps puts pressure on the timber. You'll need 4 layers or so. 

 

Step 4, light sand to clean up any saw marks on cut sides using sanding block. Be very careful on the ends as you are end grain to the timber and it can split. Best to always sand towards the middle of the board, not an edge when end grain, otherwise always go with the grain. Then sort the edges (where it will go from timber to black finish), gently sand along length of edge to give about a 1mm radius so not sharp. 

 

Step 5, mask the top and bottom faces along the edges so black paint won't get onto the faces from the sides too much when you paint them. Stick about 40mm down and then pull about 600mm sections  tight and stick along edge. Pulling tight should give you a nice straight line. If you cut the tape, you want the next bit to line up perfectly. I overlap and on the bottom layer I have it back from the edge for the last 20mm and use the second top layer to create the masking to avoid a jagged line. 

 

Step 6, place board on some blocks etc, to raise off the floor so you can paint the whole edge. You'll need about 3 coats. When dry peel off tape. 

 

Step 7, some paint will have bled through. If dry, gently sand off the top and bottom surfaces. I then very gently ran the sanding block along the length of each edge at a very slight angle out of plane to the top and bottom surface. Ie just along the start of the 1mm radius. This creates a nice defined edge/line between the black and timber finish and deals with small bleeds. 

 

Step 8, you'll need about 3 coats of oil.

 

I'd recommend doing one shelf at a time. And you'll probably find the last one is the best one after the practice and is the one for the top shelf. 

Thanks for all the details!
It would help dummies like me :)

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 06/12/2020 at 11:56 PM, DrSK said:

I needed were 3 of 2100mm by 405mm. I ended up with 4 as I needed 2 sheets to get the 3 shelves. My timber is 30mm thick.

Hello DrSk,

 

What sort of timber did you get ?

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16 hours ago, nirmal1988 said:

Hello DrSk,

 

What sort of timber did you get ?

It was just pine. Planks bonded together. Can't remember what the product was called. Was in trade area. 

 

 

IMG_20210103_110737.jpg

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