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I am still (slowly, slowly) working my way thru auditioning various speakers etc. I just ran into this little video with a (surely one of many) way to empirically work out your best speaker placement (assuming soundstage is what you're going for... https://youtu.be/MOY_SneLtro

 

Did anyone use this (or similar) method? Was it successful?

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Too long … too boring.  :(

 

(But, yes … my spkrs do disappear!)

 

Andy

 

Edited by andyr
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Did'n't try but wasn't there another video on 'LOTS' by the same channel?, which is his speaker placement guide? Great concept but room is too messy. Need to clear the room first 😃

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sna tragic: hey babe, you know that 20K we pulled outta our SMS fund? ...so i reinvested it in a awesome new pair of speakers, they arrive tomorrow

 

significant other: you what? what about the awesome speakers you bought 6 months ago ?

 

sna tragic: oh those! they disappeared babe

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On 03/09/2020 at 7:16 PM, perthpete said:

I am still (slowly, slowly) working my way thru auditioning various speakers etc. I just ran into this little video with a (surely one of many) way to empirically work out your best speaker placement (assuming soundstage is what you're going for... https://youtu.be/MOY_SneLtro

 

Did anyone use this (or similar) method? Was it successful?

 

Hey @perthpete

 

As a serious response; no i haven't tried that presenter's method.  It might be worth a go if the speakers are not too large/heavy to keep repositioning.  I simply positioned mine out from the front wall, and out from the corners, to an extent that made sense to me...and which i found much later happened to be essentially the 'rule of 1/5' discussed in the Dynaudio speaker placement youtube vid (warning: an overly long and stiffly presented video 😆).  Generally with very good result...and the recording/mastering being a huge factor IMO. 

 

 

Cheers

2B

 

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Will watch this video in an hour or so (when wify is away :-)). I most definitely have learned by now for sure that it is good to put speakers away from the walls...

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I’ve found the Wilson Audio Speaker Positioning, known as WASP, very useful, especially the room voicing technique.

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The best disappearing speakers I've ever heard was a pair of KEF LS50W in our fully insulated but not yet gyp rocked room with the speakers in a large open window. The sound just hang in the air in between the speakers. It was spooky, that good. But ultimately it lacked body and I think over time it would have bored me to tears. I think it's necessary to find a balance between sound stage and tonal accuracy. I would trade sound stage for tonal accuracy any time.

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On 14/09/2020 at 2:46 AM, Pim said:

I would trade sound stage for tonal accuracy any time.

if tonal accuracy means a smooth frequency response, then that's critical for any good speaker - and the best speakers have a smooth frequency response on and off axis, so 1st reflections from walls/floor/ceiling have the same spectral content as the direct sound.

"Sound stage" is captured via good recording techniques, where a sense of the recording space can be replicated in the listening room if you have speakers with a smooth frequency response on and off axis.

The trend towards recordings with close miking these days removes any real sense of the space the recording was done in, and worse "pan potting" creates unrealistic "sound stages" - an example being recordings of piano where the low keys come from 1 speaker and the high keys the other - the piano is the width of your speakers :( hardly great sound stage.

 

IMO speakers that have a smooth frequency response on and off axis will "disappear" more easily, and be less difficult to place in the room.

They will also be better able to replicate any "soundstage" information on the recording.

 

Mike

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On 08/09/2020 at 8:35 PM, awayward said:

I’ve found the Wilson Audio Speaker Positioning, known as WASP, very useful, especially the room voicing technique.

Agreed.

 

cheers,

Terry

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On 08/09/2020 at 6:35 PM, awayward said:

I’ve found the Wilson Audio Speaker Positioning, known as WASP, very useful, especially the room voicing technique.

Especially with a set of Wilsons...😉

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20 minutes ago, Hydrology said:

Especially with a set of Wilsons...😉

Just out of curiosity, WASP has been around for many years, is it still the setup procedure Wilson recommend for their speakers?

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