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Peter-E

LED replacement

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Just curious whether anyone has bothered replacing LEDS in stalled in their TT to match LEDs in other kit.
i.e. my TT has red LEDS but the Amp has blue.
I am thinking of changing the red for blue.

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Just purchased a Technics SL1210 mk7   turntable.  Leds can be either red or blue, so I will be setting mine to red so they match my Nighthawk Phono.

Not sure if I would go to the bother of actually changing the led if it was not possible to do it with a switch but my preference is definitely to have all kit the same colour.  

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I'm not concerned about having matching coloured LEDs in different equipment.  I take it as the character of each device.  But I've never had matching equipment.  LEDs are easy to replace if it bothers you. 

 

I did have a Yamaha cassette deck, with three LEDs for the normal/chrome/metal tape types.  Normal was green, and it bothered me that chrome and metal were both red - I wanted differentiation so I could instantly tell if I had accidentally set the wrong position.  So I changed the metal-position LED to an orange one.  I got the cassette deck regularly serviced by Yamaha.  They would return it to factory spec, so they would always replace the orange LED with a red one, and I would get my orange LED returned in a small plastic bag.  First thing when I got home was to dismantle it to reinstall the orange LED.  It was very annoying. 

 

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I haven't changed LED colours, but I have put resistors in series a couple of times to lower intensity of ones that were glaringly bright.  Needless to say the critical question is can you get sufficient access to change them without damaging anything.   All the best.

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3 hours ago, gibbo9000 said:

I haven't changed LED colours, but I have put resistors in series a couple of times to lower intensity of ones that were glaringly bright.  Needless to say the critical question is can you get sufficient access to change them without damaging anything.   All the best.

I wont be attempting it till the warranty is over. But they should be accessible 

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I agree that the intensity of many LEDs needs taming.  I very much like that the intensity of all the illuminated parts of my clock radio are adjusted according to the ambient light via an inbuilt light sensor.  But that's an attention to detail that I wouldn't expect manufacturers wanting to invest in for other devices.

 

"Light Dims" are translucent stickers that can be placed over LED lights to lower the intensity.  No need to insert resistors or to mess with warranty.  I've used them, and they are not visually intrusive and do their job well - https://www.lightdims.com/index.php

 

Note:  I do like the idea of inserting resistors to lower the intensity when it's practical to do so; the stickers are a good alternate when it's not practical to mess with the electronics or you don't have the confidence to do so.

 

 

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Leds are very useful for altering SQ.

Red for a relaxed "warm" sound.

Blue for a more "clinical" sound.

Tongue only half in cheek.

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I looked at doing this a several years ago but...

But the idea stalled when I found that I could not source Blue LEDs that run on the same voltage as red and green ones. Blue LEDs typically required a higher voltage. But that may have changed by now.

 

Just keep in mind the working voltage of LEDs are not the same.

 

BTW I don't look at anything when listening to music, so it does not matter to me now what colour any of it is.

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1 hour ago, rockpig said:

I looked at doing this a several years ago but...

But the idea stalled when I found that I could not source Blue LEDs that run on the same voltage as red and green ones. Blue LEDs typically required a higher voltage. But that may have changed by now.

 

Just keep in mind the working voltage of LEDs are not the same.

Correct and this can be fixed by altering the current limiting resistor in series with the LED. Or you can use a trim pot. Just use the formula R=E / I to determine Resistor value.

 

Different coloured LED have different forward voltages and this is universal.

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