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Cloth Ears

It's that time of year again - Truffles incoming!!!

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Got my order in for some fresh truffles from Tassie. Should be arriving on Tuesday. Yummy yummy yummy!

 

I figure truffled Brie, truffled steak, mushroom&truffle risotto and maybe some truffled scrambled eggs if there's enough left...

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I’ve been impatiently waiting for the truffle sellers to return to the market in Canberra.

They aren’t great but nice for pastas and risotto. 

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8 hours ago, Cloth Ears said:

Got my order in for some fresh truffles from Tassie. Should be arriving on Tuesday. Yummy yummy yummy!

 

I figure truffled Brie, truffled steak, mushroom&truffle risotto and maybe some truffled scrambled eggs if there's enough left...

Would go great with that $60 carton of 2010 Merlot. Mmm, mmm, mmm.

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14 hours ago, Bell Ringer said:

I’ve been impatiently waiting for the truffle sellers to return to the market in Canberra.

They aren’t great but nice for pastas and risotto. 

I get mine from Tassie - $1/gram for pieces (plus postage - $35 up to 400g).

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Where are you buying them from? Do they have a website?

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Truffles of Tasmania. Send an email to Orders, addressing Leonie. My prices are $1/gram for pieces, $1.25/gram for small truffles, $1.35/gram for first grade with cuts And more expensive (up to $1.8/gram) for whole, large truffles.

Minimum 100g. $35 postage for up to 400g.

Very good value - say Jonathan recommended you. I think they're harvesting today/tomorrow.

 

Note: I cannot guarantee you'll get my prices. But I'm a private buyer - I've just been buying for a few years now. I've bought some 60-day dry aged Porterhouse for using with the delivery (and some nice mushrooms for in a truffle risotto).

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Just found out this morning - it's apparently free postage this week! I'm not sure if they've sold out the most recent harvest, or if they're doing another one...

 

Christmas in June for me!!!

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I tried a truffle pasta in Italy a few years back and couldn't finish it, way too strong a flavour for me. Each to their own but there are many desirable foods I just don't get like crab and lobster, not enough ROI :laugh:.

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I’m pretty meh about crabs and lobsters (I’d rather have a nice fish fillet), but I do like truffles. I’ve never cooked with them myself, so I don’t think I’ll go and spend hundreds just to give it a try ;) 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Steffen said:

I’m pretty meh about crabs and lobsters (I’d rather have a nice fish fillet), but I do like truffles. I’ve never cooked with them myself, so I don’t think I’ll go and spend hundreds just to give it a try ;) 

Me and my brother-in-law went to a truffle cooking class about 7 years ago. It's actually really easy, you don't want to 'cook' with them too much, but you do need a microplane and a good slicer (we use a very fine, sharp. mandolin). The secret is to have it warm enough for the aroma and flavour to spread, but not so warm that the truffles get dried out or burnt. Unfortunately this is no longer going (she's too busy - I think she's the coroner for Victoria).


Prior to that, it was mostly going to special 'truffle dinners' at restaurants (not so easy this year). One of the best was Paringa Estate only last year - where they had truffles from all over Australia in various different dishes. The Fat Duck was the best previous use (and only on a couple of plates), and they got all of theirs from Manjimup.

 

Simple things to do with truffles:

  • Truffle butter - good butter, use about 1:4 truffle to butter by weight, finely grate it using the micro-plane, mix together into a homogeneous paste, then wrap in glad wrap and foil and store in the freezer. Cut slices as needed to add small amounts of flavour to a risotto or scrambled eggs or on a steak.
  • Cauliflower mash - truffles work really well with cauliflower. Lightly saute the florets in butter, then steam until tender (we nuke it as it doesn't lose any flavour that way), push it through a potato ricer, then blend it with some butter and a little cream and enough micro-planed truffle to turn the mash grey. 
  • Truffled Brie - finely slice enough truffles to cover a whole brie. We use half mm for this. Cut the brie in half (if you do this straight from the fridge it doesn't stick to the knife as much) - we do this twice, like a layer cake and do two layers of truffle. Then leave it for at least a couple of days (if it's not too hot, then the last 24 hours out of the fridge). We then put it in the oven at 40 degrees for a couple of hours so it goes 'just runny'. Consume immediately!
  • Scrambled eggs - keeps some eggs with the truffles for a couple of days. Make your usual scrambled eggs, maybe with a bit more butter than usual, and near the end, just when you're about to serve, dump a bunch of micro-planed truffle and fold it in.
  • Risotto - I usually do this with a mushroom risotto, using Shiitake and a bit of Porcini powder. And Carnaroli rice if you can get it, but Arborio is fine also. When you get to il riposo (i.e. resting), I add in micro-planed truffle and fold it in. Then during la mantecatura, I add in some thin slices of truffle along with some butter and Parmesan.
  • Roast chook - OK, this is a little more complex. Goes really good with roast potatoes and Cauli mash.
    • Get a really nice chook (you can pre-prep by brining if you want it even better). Slice up a bunch of truffles and also slice some butter into thin slices. Push your hand in between the skin and the breast and loosen the skin as much as possible. Shove (there's no other work for it) slices of butter and truffle as much as you can wherever the skin is loosened. Shove a lemon, that's been skewered a few times, into the inside (this prevents drying out), along with some thyme or sage or other bits o' greenery.
    • Chook is cooked at 75 degrees (if the temperature is even throughout the bird), so have an accurate thermometer handy. I cook the chook at 90 or 100, and it takes a few hours (longer for a bigger bird) until the temperature is over 73 everywhere. Best place is between the leg and body into the thigh. Pull it out, cover with foil and let rest for 30 minutes (this is important).
    • But, but, it's white and looking very ugly!!!
    • You bump up the temperature of the over to roast your potatoes (and other stuff) and start them off. When you've got about 20-30 minutes left to go on the potatoes, heat up the chook roasting tray a little on the stove, then put it back in the oven on the top shelf. This will brown the skin without overcooking the truffles. It's a lot of time to just do a chook, but I guarantee you'll remember it.

 

I used to be the same about lobsters. Worked in a kitchen on Dunk Island for a few months and they didn't stop you from having it. Just kind of wore out my liking of it. I've since gone back and found it's good. Just cooked is best, with a little butter sauce and some light herbs. Also, bugs, or langoustines or yabbies are quite different when you get to know them. But price is a factor - not like 40 years ago, when only the tails were exported and the rest was 'thrown out' (LOL).

 

Edited by Cloth Ears
tidying up

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Oh. Truffles should not be used gently. They have a limited shelf-life (truffle butter in the freezer and freeze-dried are the exceptions) and there's nothing more disappointing than barely being able to taste the truffle...

I've bought 270g, which I'll share with my BIL. So, about 130g each (after evaporation). That's 3 uses, possibly 4, or maybe 2. And if I was allowed a family gathering - maybe the whole lot!

 

Rule of thumb is, when you think you've added enough, add just a little more!

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What about those truffles in a little jar, that they have at Aldi sometimes? Not sure how they preserved, pickled perhaps? Are they any good? They’re cheap, from memory <$10 for one 3-4cm diameter one.

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24 minutes ago, Cloth Ears said:

Simple things to do with truffles:

  • Truffle butter - good butter, use about 1:4 truffle to butter by weight, finely grate it using the micro-plane, mix together into a homogeneous paste, then wrap in glad wrap and foil and store in the freezer. Cut slices as needed to add small amounts of flavour to a risotto or scrambled eggs or on a steak.
  • Cauliflower mash - truffles work really well with cauliflower. Lightly saute the florets in butter, then steam until tender (we nuke it as it doesn't lose any flavour that way), push it through a ..........................

 

Thanks for nothing!!!

Ive now got a keyboard covered in drool...

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7 minutes ago, Steffen said:

What about those truffles in a little jar, that they have at Aldi sometimes? Not sure how they preserved, pickled perhaps? Are they any good? They’re cheap, from memory <$10 for one 3-4cm diameter one.

They have the look, but honestly, truffle oil is better for flavour. Truffles actually can go mouldy or rot if not done properly, so I think they might be cooked first and then stored in oil. But the truffle oil (actually not from the truffle, they isolated the flavour/smell molecule) works quite well and can be used sparingly. If you find something like champignon and truffle pate, that's a really good showcase for how to do truffles long-term (too difficult for me).

If you do grab those from Aldi, also find some truffle oil somewhere - then you'll have the texture (they got that right) and the flavour. Then again, they might have the oil flavour right too - I don't know!

We get this sometimes (https://www.tartufi.it/en/specialita-tartufo/bont-di-tartufo/salsa-tartufata-nera/), the English label says "Summer Truffle Pate".

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13 minutes ago, Papajero said:

Thanks for nothing!!!

Ive now got a keyboard covered in drool...

You're welcome! I have the same issue because I have these little black thing in my refrigerator...

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Adding truffle to soft cheeses makes for a really good evening. First to a Boatshed goats cheese and secondly to a Maggie Beer Triple Brie. A couple of days to infuse and some warming to blood temperature (and the choosing of an appropriate liquid refreshment) are all that will be required now...

IMG_20200625_140151.thumb.jpg.279ec9ab7b881038deb1c916789becc6.jpg

 

IMG_20200625_141228.thumb.jpg.1b913a621a619970f1eb2e7dbf3f6428.jpg

 

P.S. The risotto last night was really yummy...

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Prompted by your initial post, Mrs Bellringer and I went to a local truffle farm last week as part of the Canberra truffle festival. Too early in the season to purchase but the owners take you out with a dog and find some truffles and then they cook them up. Fun afternoon. 
 

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Posted (edited)

I love truffled pecorino and brie (shop bought, not self made).

Edited by Steffen
tpyo

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9 hours ago, Steffen said:

I love truffled pecorino and brie (shop bought, not self made).

Yes, cheeses (any fat, basically) take on truffles flavour and aroma and work with them. Parmesan and other umami heavy cheeses are a perfect combination.

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The making of the truffle butter...

IMG_20200628_094129.thumb.jpg.7df930c322f6f60c0824295e978a5920.jpg

Ingredients & tools..

 

IMG_20200628_094843.thumb.jpg.f0258ed33507b66f48783cd536555a48.jpg

Cube the butter, allow to soften, add truffle powder and grate the fresh stuff with a microplane...

 

IMG_20200628_100609.thumb.jpg.1b6eab21036998b9bcd09364328d0239.jpg

Lots of mixing later. Thumb muscles all cramping and in pain...

 

IMG_20200628_101011.thumb.jpg.3279f0f8518f682a2d06472500bdfcab.jpg

All rolled up in Glad Wrap. Last step is to roll in foil and store in the freezer.

 

The left-overs were used to make scrambled eggs for Sunday breakfast...

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