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58 minutes ago, Fordute said:

Politicians massage.

Labor of course

Conservatives don’t do sex😀

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Hi All,   A little Aussie movie, Wake in Fright: A teacher arrives in the rough outback mining town, planning to stay overnight before catching the plane to Sydney. His one night stretches t

Hi All,   An Australian Classic, Bad Boy Bubby.    Bubby is a 35-year-old man who has never set foot outside his mother's dingy apartment in the back of a printing press in an indu

Duel (1971) dir Spielberg (first feature)      









And he had a bit part in this

One of the best movies I’ve ever seen 

And most philosophically important for me about the rise of fascism and the willingness of the middle class to turn their back on it because it was economically good for them

And it’s happening in Europe again but this time the driving force is America 

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Excuse if posted before: The Rocky Horror Picture Show

 

MV5BOGIzYjM3YzMtMjk5ZS00NDY2LTllMjEtNjYw

 

I went to the screenings at the Valhalla Cinema in Richmond quite a few times. An absolute hoot!

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I see a number of you have been listing multiple cult movies you rate since this thread started, quite a number of those that are already listed would also be on my all time list as well.
Below are most of my favourite cult movies that have not been mentioned that I would be happy to watch and often do time and time again. Many of the movies I like I have the music sound tracks to which get played. ...  Starting with just about my all time favourite movie Lawerence.

 

 

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EB8EB60B-D5BB-4D79-B68A-3677FC3F68CC.jpeg

 

 

6C1C5F96-FFD1-4F55-9052-BDF7FFCA29C0.jpeg

Edited by TerryO
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Cult movies: a definition of

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cult_film

 

< A cult film or cult movie, also commonly referred to as a cult classic, is a film that has acquired a cult following. Cult films are known for their dedicated, passionate fanbase which forms an elaborate subculture that engage in repeated viewings, quoting dialogue, and audience participation. Inclusive definitions allow for major studio productions, especially box office bombs, while exclusive definitions focus more on obscure, transgressive films shunned by the mainstream. The difficulty in defining the term and subjectivity of what qualifies as a cult film mirror classificatory disputes about art. The term cult film itself was first used in the 1970s to describe the culture that surrounded underground films and midnight movies, though cult was in common use in film analysis for decades prior to that.

Cult films trace their origin back to controversial and suppressed films kept alive by dedicated fans. In some cases, reclaimed or rediscovered films have acquired cult followings decades after their original release, occasionally for their camp value. Other cult films have since become well-respected or reassessed as classics; there is debate as to whether these popular and accepted films are still cult films. After failing in the cinema, some cult films have become regular fixtures on cable television or profitable sellers on home video. Others have inspired their own film festivals. Cult films can both appeal to specific subcultures and form their own subcultures. Other media that reference cult films can easily identify which demographics they desire to attract and offer savvy fans an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge.

Cult films frequently break cultural taboos, and many feature excessive displays of violence, gore, sexuality, profanity, or combinations thereof. This can lead to controversy, censorship, and outright bans; less transgressive films may attract similar amounts of controversy when critics call them frivolous or incompetent. Films that fail to attract requisite amounts of controversy may face resistance when labeled as cult films. Mainstream films and big budget blockbusters have attracted cult followings similar to more underground and lesser known films; fans of these films often emphasize the films' niche appeal and reject the more popular aspects. Fans who like the films for the wrong reasons, such as perceived elements that represent mainstream appeal and marketing, will often be ostracized or ridiculed. Likewise, fans who stray from accepted subcultural scripts may experience similar rejection.

Since the late 1970s, cult films have become increasingly popular. Films that once would have been limited to obscure cult followings are now capable of breaking into the mainstream, and showings of cult films have proved to be a profitable business venture. Overbroad usage of the term has resulted in controversy, as purists state it has become a meaningless descriptor applied to any film that is the slightest bit weird or unconventional; others accuse Hollywood studios of trying to artificially create cult films or use the term as a marketing tactic. Films are frequently stated to be an "instant cult classic" now, occasionally before they are released. Fickle fans on the Internet have latched on to unreleased films only to abandon them later on release. At the same time, other films have acquired massive, quick cult followings, owing to spreading virally through social media. Easy access to cult films via video on demand and peer-to-peer file sharing has led some critics to pronounce the death of cult films. >

 

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A great book on cult movies, think I lent mine years ago and never got it back! A couple of sequels have since been published

 

https://www.amazon.com/Cult-Movies-Classics-Sleepers-Wonderful/dp/0517201852

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cult_Movies_(book)

 

Cult Movies is a 1981 book by Danny Peary, consisting of a series of essays regarding what Peary described as the 100 most representative examples of the cult film phenomenon. The films are presented in alphabetical order, with each chapter featuring a story synopsis for the covered title, Peary’s response to the film, production and release details, and a brief selection of contemporary critical reviews.

In the book’s foreword, Peary notes that out of the thousands of movies that have been made, “only an extremely small number have elicited a fiery passion in moviegoers that exists long after their initial releases.” Cult movies are defined by Peary as “special films which for one reason or another have been taken to heart by segments of the movie audience, cherished, protected, and most of all, enthusiastically championed.” He explains that “the typical Hollywood product” never attains cult status since all viewers perceive these average films in more or less the same way, with no real disagreement as to the film’s quality. But cult films “are born in controversy, in arguments over quality, theme, talent and other matters. Cultists believe they are among the blessed few who have discovered something in particular that the average moviegoer and critic have missed – the something that makes the pictures extraordinary. >

 

Films mentioned in the book

 

< The films

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3 hours ago, TerryO said:

I see a number of you have been listing multiple cult movies you rate since this thread started, quite a number of those that are already listed would also be on my all time list as well.
Below are most of my favourite cult movies that have not been mentioned that I would be happy to watch and often do time and time again. Many of the movies I like I have the music sound tracks to which get played. ...  Starting with just about my all time favourite movie Lawerence.

 

 

D2F54084-A71F-4040-9388-BC9CD06554AD.jpeg

0C40C53A-F74F-4848-8E2E-375C852B87B1.jpeg

9B3B5529-EF7D-4106-8043-01DBB82775DF.jpeg

74CF9FCD-E62B-48E3-B65D-971AD4A22D49.jpeg

3749303E-5923-4F48-9898-7985FC556EC9.jpeg

62A7F67E-5DEC-47AD-82B2-4264C8665943.jpeg

26E41190-ECAF-456A-A54F-620C0819B3BC.jpeg

27218013-74EE-4491-B900-771EC9FA37EB.jpeg

8C1153A5-E311-437F-BEC3-D3BCD8E9A069.jpeg

D6DCFEB7-CF16-4CC8-BD32-02659083A157.jpeg

8F6C3AF1-8BF7-456B-A06D-3D7200431777.jpeg

3738CDFA-4C52-45ED-967E-07338709BD4E.jpeg

5331E6D7-88F9-4B4E-8256-5CB3D71ED0EE.jpeg

EB8EB60B-D5BB-4D79-B68A-3677FC3F68CC.jpeg

 

 

6C1C5F96-FFD1-4F55-9052-BDF7FFCA29C0.jpeg

Surely none of those are cult films

I think Apocalypse Now is one of the best movies ever made

Most of the others are massively popular and multi winners of awards including Academy ones

Not that it matters but what constitutes a cult movie?
 

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9 minutes ago, keyse1 said:

Surely none of those are cult films

I think Apocalypse Now is one of the best movies ever made

Most of the others are massively popular and multi winners of awards including Academy ones

Not that it matters but what constitutes a cult movie?
 

Fair enough, if the movies that I picked don’t qualify then more than happy to delete them.

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4 minutes ago, TerryO said:

Fair enough, if the movies that I picked don’t qualify then more than happy to delete them.

No no

I don’t mean that 

I’m the last person to complain about someone posting something 

I was just surprised to see them there

Lots of popular movies are posted as cult films

I can say you’ve got good taste but don’t delete them

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2 minutes ago, keyse1 said:

No no

I don’t mean that 

I’m the last person to complain about someone posting something 

I was just surprised to see them there

Lots of popular movies are posted as cult films

I can say you’ve got good taste but don’t delete them

On reflection some of those I picked are questionable as cult movies, I got carried away with the movies I like. Several though I do believe do fall into the category. 

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5 hours ago, Ian McP said:

Cult movies: a definition of

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cult_film

 

< A cult film or cult movie, also commonly referred to as a cult classic, is a film that has acquired a cult following. Cult films are known for their dedicated, passionate fanbase which forms an elaborate subculture that engage in repeated viewings, quoting dialogue, and audience participation. Inclusive definitions allow for major studio productions, especially box office bombs, while exclusive definitions focus more on obscure, transgressive films shunned by the mainstream. The difficulty in defining the term and subjectivity of what qualifies as a cult film mirror classificatory disputes about art. The term cult film itself was first used in the 1970s to describe the culture that surrounded underground films and midnight movies, though cult was in common use in film analysis for decades prior to that.

Cult films trace their origin back to controversial and suppressed films kept alive by dedicated fans. In some cases, reclaimed or rediscovered films have acquired cult followings decades after their original release, occasionally for their camp value. Other cult films have since become well-respected or reassessed as classics; there is debate as to whether these popular and accepted films are still cult films. After failing in the cinema, some cult films have become regular fixtures on cable television or profitable sellers on home video. Others have inspired their own film festivals. Cult films can both appeal to specific subcultures and form their own subcultures. Other media that reference cult films can easily identify which demographics they desire to attract and offer savvy fans an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge.

Cult films frequently break cultural taboos, and many feature excessive displays of violence, gore, sexuality, profanity, or combinations thereof. This can lead to controversy, censorship, and outright bans; less transgressive films may attract similar amounts of controversy when critics call them frivolous or incompetent. Films that fail to attract requisite amounts of controversy may face resistance when labeled as cult films. Mainstream films and big budget blockbusters have attracted cult followings similar to more underground and lesser known films; fans of these films often emphasize the films' niche appeal and reject the more popular aspects. Fans who like the films for the wrong reasons, such as perceived elements that represent mainstream appeal and marketing, will often be ostracized or ridiculed. Likewise, fans who stray from accepted subcultural scripts may experience similar rejection.

Since the late 1970s, cult films have become increasingly popular. Films that once would have been limited to obscure cult followings are now capable of breaking into the mainstream, and showings of cult films have proved to be a profitable business venture. Overbroad usage of the term has resulted in controversy, as purists state it has become a meaningless descriptor applied to any film that is the slightest bit weird or unconventional; others accuse Hollywood studios of trying to artificially create cult films or use the term as a marketing tactic. Films are frequently stated to be an "instant cult classic" now, occasionally before they are released. Fickle fans on the Internet have latched on to unreleased films only to abandon them later on release. At the same time, other films have acquired massive, quick cult followings, owing to spreading virally through social media. Easy access to cult films via video on demand and peer-to-peer file sharing has led some critics to pronounce the death of cult films. >

 

Well 

That clears it up for me🙃

Ive always seen them as great movies known only to fanatics

( like all the music I listen to)

Or movies so bad they become hilarious and are redeemed so to speak😀

 

 

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4 minutes ago, keyse1 said:

Ive always seen them as great movies known only to fanatics

 

Or movies so bad they become hilarious and are redeemed so to speak😀

I think those two categories are at the core, however there are many strong sub-categories, so much so that often times a cult movie turns out to be neither of the 2 main flavours:

 

eg Muriel's Wedding (1994)

 

image.png.16f87f1d0e56eb6bc68cb5d3462b3949.png

 

image.png.fff470083eb69361457842819c3865f1.png

 

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5 hours ago, Ian McP said:

A great book on cult movies, think I lent mine years ago and never got it back! A couple of sequels have since been published

 

https://www.amazon.com/Cult-Movies-Classics-Sleepers-Wonderful/dp/0517201852

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cult_Movies_(book)

 

Cult Movies is a 1981 book by Danny Peary, consisting of a series of essays regarding what Peary described as the 100 most representative examples of the cult film phenomenon. The films are presented in alphabetical order, with each chapter featuring a story synopsis for the covered title, Peary’s response to the film, production and release details, and a brief selection of contemporary critical reviews.

In the book’s foreword, Peary notes that out of the thousands of movies that have been made, “only an extremely small number have elicited a fiery passion in moviegoers that exists long after their initial releases.” Cult movies are defined by Peary as “special films which for one reason or another have been taken to heart by segments of the movie audience, cherished, protected, and most of all, enthusiastically championed.” He explains that “the typical Hollywood product” never attains cult status since all viewers perceive these average films in more or less the same way, with no real disagreement as to the film’s quality. But cult films “are born in controversy, in arguments over quality, theme, talent and other matters. Cultists believe they are among the blessed few who have discovered something in particular that the average moviegoer and critic have missed – the something that makes the pictures extraordinary. >

 

Films mentioned in the book

 

< The films

I’ve seen 28 of them

All the westerns 

Why would Rio Bravo be in there

The Searchers is a great movie and highly influential as in Star Wars according to George Lucas

I remember Billy Jack karate/Kung fu type

great scene when surrounded by villains he told them they might get him but he would do this that and the other to them

Which he did 

Sort of like Wyatt Earp telling the leaders of a lynch mob that they would be dead before Him

Sort of how we all wish we were when confronted by violence😀

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Just now, zippi said:

I think those two categories are at the core, however there are many strong sub-categories, so much so that often times a cult movie turns out to be neither of the 2 main flavours:

 

eg Muriel's Wedding (1994)

 

image.png.16f87f1d0e56eb6bc68cb5d3462b3949.png

 

image.png.fff470083eb69361457842819c3865f1.png

 

That is not a fictional film

But yes I can see how that would qualify 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_Moves_(1975_film)

 

<Night Moves is a 1975 American neo-noir film[3][4][5] directed by Arthur Penn. It stars Gene Hackman, Jennifer Warren, Susan Clark, and features early career appearances by Melanie Griffith and James Woods.

Hackman was nominated for the BAFTA Award for his portrayal of Harry Moseby, a private investigator. The film has been called "a seminal modern noir work from the 1970s",[6] which refers to its relationship with the film noir tradition of detective films. The original screenplay is by Scottish writer Alan Sharp.

Although Night Moves was not considered particularly successful at the time of its release, it has attracted viewers and significant critical attention following its videotape and DVD releases.[7] In 2010, Manohla Dargis described it as "the great, despairing Night Moves (1975), with Gene Hackman as a private detective who ends up circling the abyss, a no-exit comment on the post-1968, post-Watergate times >

 

 

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The Wicker Man

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/oct/22/wicker-man-hardy-horror

 

< Robin Hardy's slow-burning chiller, from a screenplay by Anthony Shaffer (author of Sleuth, and brother of Peter), was once hailed by the magazine Cinefantastique as "the Citizen Kane of horror movies".

It was originally released as a supporting feature to Don't Look Now, but had a troubled distribution history, which delayed its elevation to cult status until the 1980s. Ailing production company British Lion was bought by EMI midway through shooting, and Hardy was obliged to make cuts (but resisted demands by studio executives that he change the ending); a further 13 minutes were cut for the American release. It wasn't until nearly 30 years later that a restored version became available on DVD. (In 2006 Neil LaBute wrote and directed a risible remake, transposed to a matriarchal community on an island off the coast of America's Pacific north-west region and starring Nicolas Cage.) >

 

 

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