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realysm42

IsoAcoustics; Gaia vs Aperta

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Posted (edited)

Hi, I'm interested in testing one of these products on my loudspeakers (Quadral Galan 9), but I don't know which is meant to be superior?

 

Does anyone have an idea on this?

 

The dimensions of my speakers are quite a bit larger than the Aperta 300 as well, so there would be overhang if I choose this approach, which I'm not comfortable with, but I wouldn't count it out if it's meant to be the superior of the two.

 

**EDIT** I've just realised that that Gaia is meant for floor-standing loudspeakers. I'm still interested to hear your thoughts on this product.

Edited by realysm42
Reading comprehension failure

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41 minutes ago, realysm42 said:

Hi, I'm interested in testing one of these products on my loudspeakers (Quadral Galan 9), but I don't know which is meant to be superior?

 

Does anyone have an idea on this?

 

The dimensions of my speakers are quite a bit larger than the Aperta 300 as well, so there would be overhang if I choose this approach, which I'm not comfortable with, but I wouldn't count it out if it's meant to be the superior of the two.

 

**EDIT** I've just realised that that Gaia is meant for floor-standing loudspeakers. I'm still interested to hear your thoughts on this product.

There is a thread here;

 

https://www.stereo.net.au/forums/topic/124276-iso-acoustics-gaia-speaker-isolation/?tab=comments#comment-1855111

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If you look at the pricing, Isoacoustics clearly believe that the Gaia are the superior products and priced accordingly. 

 

I am using the Aperta stands for my stereo and the proaudio studio monitor equivalents for my home theatre. The Aperta stands are supposed to be better but it is difficult to pick them apart in listening tests.  The stands worked for me by reducing the smearing of instruments.  I have not used the Gaia but others have posted in the thread above.

 

Here's a thought : the proaudio stands are relatively cheap eg StoreDJ. If your speakers are less than 18 kg, maybe you want to experiment?

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As an engineer working in acoustics and vibration control, go to bunnings and buy a pack of washing machine vibration pads about $8.00 the active material is the same if not better than that used in expensive audio products.  You will get 5 times more active damping and 5 times the contact area of damping.

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40 minutes ago, ChaddoNobby said:

As an engineer working in acoustics and vibration control, go to bunnings and buy a pack of washing machine vibration pads about $8.00 the active material is the same if not better than that used in expensive audio products.  You will get 5 times more active damping and 5 times the contact area of damping.

By all means, try the Bunnings pads. But  your professional qualifications on vibrations and experience does not necessarily translate to better audio outcomes. Fair enough if you have tried the Isoacoutics feet, stands and heard nothing...

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Posted (edited)

Literally an hour ago I just bought some anti vibration pads from Bunnings. Was tossing up last night if I should get the IsoAcoustics ISO-155 stands for my small bookshelf speakers on table.  I didn’t care much about aesthetic, the speakers are not my main/ secondary system, so I just bought a pack of two 200x200x15 pads, too easy too cheap.  I am not chasing for best audio quality either.

 

I would say the advantage of the stands is that they are height adjustable. But I find it quite fiddly trying to sit my speakers with rounded edges onto the 4 points of the stand properly, and I would say the speakers should overhang, but not too much. Finding the perfect fit/size is not easy unless you take your speaker to the shop to test out, which I think you should, because Aperta is not cheap. 

 

Never needed to try the Gaia, so no comments. 

Edited by att23

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4 hours ago, ChaddoNobby said:

As an engineer working in acoustics and vibration control, go to bunnings and buy a pack of washing machine vibration pads about $8.00 the active material is the same if not better than that used in expensive audio products.  You will get 5 times more active damping and 5 times the contact area of damping.

Are you talking about isolation or damping? The isoacoustics products are designed for isolation, which is a very different kettle of fish to damping. 

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Soundscape said:

Are you talking about isolation or damping? The isoacoustics products are designed for isolation, which is a very different kettle of fish to damping. 

I use the Whites (bunnings) products to isolate.

 

Edit: if it stops the vibrations traveling from the one surface to the other It's isolation IMO.

 

20200215_204038.jpg.c4815361ef79718025d8c23ef5c74d58.jpg

Edited by muon*

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18 minutes ago, att23 said:

Literally an hour ago I just bought some anti vibration pads from Bunnings. Was tossing up last night if I should get the IsoAcoustics ISO-155 stands for my small bookshelf speakers on table.  I didn’t care much about aesthetic, the speakers are not my main/ secondary system, so I just bought a pack of two 200x200x15 pads, too easy too cheap.  I am not chasing for best audio quality either.

 

I would say the advantage of the stands is that they are height adjustable. But I find it quite fiddly trying to sit my speakers with rounded edges onto the 4 points of the stand properly, and I would say the speakers should overhang, but not too much. Finding the perfect fit/size is not easy unless you take your speaker to the shop to test out, which I think you should, because Aperta is not cheap. 

 

Never needed to try the Gaia, so no comments. 

Happy that you have found a Bunnings solution. 

 

I have unconventional speakers and used the smallest IKEA bamboo chopping board on top of the Aperta stands (see my about me).  And if you do mind black, the cheaper pro audio stands can do the job. I chose the Aperta because there was a silver version, usually requiring retailer to order them.

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Posted (edited)

I have/use Aperta 200s with my Floorstanders and think they're great - opening the sound up and looking good as well.

(these are the right size for your Quadral Galan 9s).

 

The Gaia's are superior but aimed more at floorstanders and at a substantial cost premium.

 

You could argue that Apertas aren't cheap ... but they are more in fitting with your level of speaker than the 'plastic' ISO series (aimed more at studio monitors)  or Bunnings washing machine pads.

 

PS: You also have pitch adjustment on the Apertas - sure, I guess you could double stack some pads.

 

 

Edited by ShellstaX
added PS

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I own GAIA I and highly recommend it. You can hear the difference straight away.  The bass is tightened and controlled. You can hear quality bass, not just boomy bass. 

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5 hours ago, ChaddoNobby said:

As an engineer working in acoustics and vibration control, go to bunnings and buy a pack of washing machine vibration pads about $8.00 the active material is the same if not better than that used in expensive audio products.  You will get 5 times more active damping and 5 times the contact area of damping.

Do you have a link to the product you mean?

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How predictable,  someone asks for opinions on a few products - and the $2 boffins push their barrow!

 

There's been a lot of discussion on the merits of the Isoacostics products,  with many reviews both professional and private endorsing them .

I heard a few demos and was open minded enough to put my cash on some Gaias for my Hulgich speakers. 

Improvement was not subtle,  and took me awhile to adjust to the different sound quality. 

 

As mentioned without distortion and coloration,  you almost feel there's something missing. 

However as you elevate the volume level, and things just get better you realise no coloration is an intoxicating thing!

 

If people could achieve the same thing with cheap Bunnings treatments, many of which I've already tried- then brands like Isoacostics would whither and die.

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24 minutes ago, Soundscape said:

Are you talking about isolation or damping? The isoacoustics products are designed for isolation, which is a very different kettle of fish to damping. 

I wonder if they eventually get to the same end goal? My very basic understanding is:
Anti vibration pads are for damping, such that oscillations will be reduced so that the speaker frequency does not engage as much with the table it is sitting on. 
Isolation stands acts like earthquake base isolation in Christchurch/Wellington buildings, to dissipate energy, where the top half of stand and speaker will move in one direction and the bottom half of stand will remain still with table or move in opposite direction. Basically making sure the speaker frequency does not engage the table it is sitting on.
My guess is isolation in IsoAcoustics products probably more effective than anti vibration pads, perhaps because the entire surface area is in contact with table and speaker. This means I should chop up my anti vibration pad in smaller pieces and only put on corners of speaker to reduce contact area.  In saying that, damping can be effective in reducing frequency such as those tuned mass dampers in buildings and footbridges. 

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Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, evil c said:

and the $2 boffins push their barrow!

They work well, whether they work as well as the expensive products I have no idea. If someone has compared and used both in the best possible way I'm happy with what ever conclusion they find.

 

$2 boffins, huh? Never expected that from you.

 

Edit: I'd be happy to compare, but when you don't have an income that allows it, you do what you can with the best options that you can afford.

Edited by muon*

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3 hours ago, evil c said:

If people could achieve the same thing with cheap Bunnings treatments, many of which I've already tried- then brands like Isoacostics would whither and die

But the tease is whether the expensive items are actually superior and worth the price.

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4 hours ago, STROP said:

But the tease is whether the expensive items are actually superior and worth the price.

Rather the tease is people derailing a thread asking opinion on two products only.

It is not an invitation for denouncing merits ,or espousing equal benefits with entirely different products .

 

I made a contribution to this thread because I was ("foolish"??) enough, to have tried out and been convinced to buy what I think is a fantastic isolation product.

 

Agreed not cheap by any means, but R & D rarely is and if can afford it - go for it!

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Posted (edited)

IsoAcoustics ISO Puck Studio Monitor Isolation Pads.

$79 per pair, 

3 or 4 pads per speaker. 

 

ISO-PUCK.jpg

Edited by Irek

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I use and own GAIA, I also use bunings pads, i have many other isolation products.

 

Many ways of doing it, with price points and aesthetics for everyone.

 

One if those things that needs to be tried in your system to work out if there is a benefit.

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16 minutes ago, AudioGeek said:

Many ways of doing it, with price points and aesthetics for everyone.

Exactly.

A set of 8 Gaias cost around $800, not everyone can afford this. Frankly I'm surprised that discussion of cheaper alternatives is being shut down (even if those alternatives are not as good)

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25 minutes ago, evil c said:

Rather the tease is people derailing a thread asking opinion on two products only.

It is not an invitation for denouncing merits ,or espousing equal benefits with entirely different products .

I want to add that OP will also appreciate posts from people who have tried it but think other products have more value

18 minutes ago, AudioGeek said:

I use and own GAIA, I also use bunings pads, i have many other isolation products.

 

Many ways of doing it, with price points and aesthetics for everyone.

 

One if those things that needs to be tried in your system to work out if there is a benefit.

I have tried many hacks as well using things from Bunnings e.g. cupboard door knobs, thick IKEA bamboo boards etc. 

4 minutes ago, sir sanders zingmore said:

Exactly.

A set of 8 Gaias cost around $800, not everyone can afford this. Frankly I'm surprised that discussion of cheaper alternatives is being shut down (even if those alternatives are not as good)

I agree the Gaia's are not cheap. Has a moderator stepped in to shut things down?

--

 

What I cannot understand is how a simple query about a product can become a heated debate?  It happens far too often. Peace everyone...

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4 minutes ago, Snoopy8 said:

Has a moderator stepped in to shut things down?

As I’m sure you are well aware, the direction of threads can be affected by people other than moderators......

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Why do engineers always feel the need to tell everyone they're an engineer? 

 

Buy your squash balls / tennis balls / other DIY affordable solutions and if they work for you, great. For those that want a scientifically proven, measurable improvement and refined approach from a commercial solution, buy IsoAcoustics or any of the other commercially available products. If you don't hear a difference, I'll be very surprised. I'm yet to hear a speaker that has not benefited from the addition of these, period.

 

BTW - I'm also an engineer 😛

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3 minutes ago, Marc said:

Why do engineers always feel the need to tell everyone they're an engineer? 

I'm not an engineer but I am a vegan :)

 

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1 hour ago, sir sanders zingmore said:

Exactly.

A set of 8 Gaias cost around $800, not everyone can afford this. Frankly I'm surprised that discussion of cheaper alternatives is being shut down (even if those alternatives are not as good)

Up to $500 cash back at the moment (depending on the model), but I suspect that's what triggered the thread in the first place:

https://www.stereo.net.au/news/better-sound-and-cash-back-with-isoacoustics

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