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hlov

FM antenna

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Hi all,

 

I want to have some advise of what kind of FM antenna can I use of my Yamaha CT 800 tuner?

 

I’m using an speaker cable as the vendor suggested me but the reception is very bad

 

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Aren't the two wires meant to be connected to two different points?

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Just now, t_mike said:

Aren't the two wires meant to be connected to two different points?

Hi mate, you mean a wire in each screw? Sorry, don’t have any idea at all

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2 minutes ago, hlov said:

Hi mate, you mean a wire in each screw?

Yes. There should be one screw as an earth connection. 

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Hi mate,

 

I worked it out, found the manual online and I’m just using a coaxial cable now.

I’m getting 3 bars now :)

 

 

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I would have hoped that your vendor would have given you more accurate and more comprehensive advice. 

 

The 300ohm ribbon antenna has given me good reception in Melbourne.  It's cheap and was the standard aerial that came with FM tuners.  No need to use speaker wire when the proper thing is easy to get and only $5.   https://www.jaycar.com.au/fm-indoor-antenna-300ohm/p/LT3002

The two wires on this cable (or your speaker wire) need to be plugged into the two 300 ohm terminals on you amp.  You have the speaker wire in your pic attached to the 75ohm aerial socket.

 

I have my hifi near my TV, so I bought a TV aerial splitter (a few dollars from electronics shops) and use that for my FM aerial - better than the internal one.  Your amp has two inputs.  On the right is a socket "75ohm unbal" (the symbol for ohms is printed on the amp) - you might find this fits a normal TV coax aerial cable.  Alternately you can use the one that you currently have the speaker wire attached, also called "75ohm unbal".  For this one you need the bare wires.  The outer shield (it may be a aluminuim foil or a braid) is connected to the strap on the upper part, and the inner insulated wire is connected to the post underneath the strap. 

 

I recall reading a comprehensive thread on this site which explained that there was an even better alternative to the TV aerial, and I think it has plans on how to make one yourself.  Try a search.  But if you are in a metropolitan area you will probably find the options above will give you a very good signal strength.  I've heard that the Blue Mountains can cause some difficulty for some who are out that way, but I'm a southerner so don' have much knowledge on that. 

 

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Edited by audiofeline

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4 minutes ago, hlov said:

Hi mate,

I worked it out, found the manual online and I’m just using a coaxial cable now.

I’m getting 3 bars now :)

[one pic deleted as the reply references the pic below],,,

D02C49DB-7D13-4075-91DC-E7A05061E2F0.jpeg

Good that you're getting better signal, but I would say more by luck.  With the 300 ohm options (eg. your speaker cable) the wire is the antenna. 

 

However, with the 75ohm option - your coax - the cable isn't the antenna, it's just a cable that needs to be connected to an aerial.  Uncurl it, and connect it to some TV rabbit ears!  Better, get a splitter for your TV antenna and plug it into that.  It appears that you are in a strong signal area, and even though this is getting a reasonable signal you can get a much better signal by using a proper aerial.

 

 

 

 

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@audiofeline so any tv antenna can double as a FM antenna? Does the splitter have to have a switch on it to switch between the two?

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Yes any t.v. antenna cable will work , no it is a splitter , it splits the signal from one to two . Not magic no switches just as it says a splitter

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4 minutes ago, DEANO23 said:

Yes any t.v. antenna cable will work , no it is a splitter , it splits the signal from one to two . Not magic no switches just as it says a splitter

So it won't matter if the tv and fm are on at the same time?

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No it shouldn't but of course antenna's are fickle things it won't be caused by the splitter 

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4 hours ago, audiofeline said:

Good that you're getting better signal, but I would say more by luck.  With the 300 ohm options (eg. your speaker cable) the wire is the antenna. 

 

However, with the 75ohm option - your coax - the cable isn't the antenna, it's just a cable that needs to be connected to an aerial.  Uncurl it, and connect it to some TV rabbit ears!  Better, get a splitter for your TV antenna and plug it into that.  It appears that you are in a strong signal area, and even though this is getting a reasonable signal you can get a much better signal by using a proper aerial.

 

 

 

 

Thanks, I actually have two wall inputs I’ll plug it to the other one and will see how it works, so far it’s been great

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Correct responses above.  If you have a splitter you should be able to run the FM tuner and TV together (although it may be difficult to listen to both at the same time!).  The splitter is like a double-adapter, no switch required. 

 

57 minutes ago, hlov said:

Thanks, I actually have two wall inputs I’ll plug it to the other one and will see how it works, so far it’s been great

Technically, they are both outputs, not inputs, but that shouldn't affect how you use them. 

 

Test each aerial socket outlet with the TV - if you get good picture/sound using each outlet, each socket is connected to the antenna via a built-in splitter, and you are good to use one for the TV and the other for your tuner.. 

 

 

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11 hours ago, hlov said:

I want to have some advise of what kind of FM antenna can I use of my Yamaha CT 800 tuner?

 

 

Edited by ShellstaX
Entry scrapped - I see you have it sorted - ground already covered. I didn't see the full thread - viewing from mobile.

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8 hours ago, ShellstaX said:

 

The guidelines above will apply to any FM tuner - cheap or high quality.

If you want to listen to AM, it will require an AM antenna attached as well as the FM antenna.

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19 hours ago, audiofeline said:

Good that you're getting better signal, but I would say more by luck.  With the 300 ohm options (eg. your speaker cable) the wire is the antenna. 

 

Yes,  the speaker wires should be split into two, and spread out into a straight line, one conductor going each way.  You are forming a simple dipole antenna.  If you are a distance from the stations, rotating the direction, so the line of the dipole is side on to the location of the FM transmitter you are trying to receive, will improve the signal level.

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On 09/02/2020 at 1:09 PM, blakey72 said:

@audiofeline so any tv antenna can double as a FM antenna? 

Not quite.

UHF TV Antennae are not recommended. (i.e. An Antenna with only UHF elements)

VHF or Combination VHF/UHF are OK and will be fine in good reception areas.

Old VHF or Combo Antennae that have the longer elements for the low-band VHF Channels (Channels 0 to 5A) are best as the FM broadcast band sits across the VHF TV Channels 3, 4 & 5.

 

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And while we are discussing FM Antennas, this (somewhat technical) discussion from a few years ago may be of interest to some...

 

 

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3 hours ago, surprisetech said:

UHF TV Antennae are not recommended. (i.e. An Antenna with only UHF elements)

 

 Does UHF mean digital? I think when digital tv came in I upgraded all wiring and the antenna.

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Ive always had an external  fm antenna  which was bought from radio parts some time ago 

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1 hour ago, Jeddie said:

 Does UHF mean digital? I think when digital tv came in I upgraded all wiring and the antenna.

 

Not really.  VHF means "very high frequency", UHF means, "ultra high frequency",   but yeah, digital TV does use UHF

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When digital tv came in the marketers started to say their antennas were "digital" to try to get people to replace their current antennas with new "digital" ones.  Consumer affairs (or similar) put out a bulletin to let people know that the old "analogue" antennas were exactly the same as the new "digital" ones and not to get sucked in by blood-sucking marketers peddling hype.  It's a good thing that doesn't happen in the audiophile world (a marketing person told me that, and they would know).  

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10 minutes ago, audiofeline said:

It's a good thing that doesn't happen in the audiophile world (a marketing person told me that, and they would know).  

Evil! :) 

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4 hours ago, Jeddie said:

 Does UHF mean digital? I think when digital tv came in I upgraded all wiring and the antenna.

No, as per aussievintage's post, it's just a frequency band.  300MHz - 3GHz

Digital TV is transmitted on VHF &/or UHF Channels depending on your location.

In most cases Digital TV is transmitted on the VHF Channels that were not in use at the time of the introduction of DTV.  i.e. Channel 6, 8, 11 & 12

VHF is preferred because it provides much better coverage than UHF.

Generally speaking, in metropolitan areas all the major stations are still on VHF channels and Community TV on UHF.

UHF Repeaters are used in hilly/mountainous areas by all the major broadcasters to fill the gaps in the VHF coverage.

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