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5L15

Portable wind up record player in a suitcase.

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Hi all,

I have a family friend who is getting on in years and she has reluctantly decided to try and sell her portable player, I thought I remember her telling me that her father bought it in 1939? Hard to remember let alone hear what someone is saying when you have young kids stuffing round while trying to have a conversation. (have to contact her again about age, number of records and spare needles)

My question being What would a fair price be for a fully functioning player in great condition be? 

I need better pics and try to find a brand name.

 

Thanks for reading.

 

291750B7-81C8-4FB8-B9D2-0A10443D4F14.jpeg

1350A3B6-3BE4-4578-B5BA-42DAC2A6DB9C.jpeg

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I have two that I purchased in really sad condition and have restored one of them.  So, I have a bit of an idea of the market for bad examples, and what it costs to restore them.  Does it really work well?  Does it play at least a full 10" record without slowing down?

 

Brand name matters of course, especially for rare machines.   Do I see some rust on the external latches and winding handle?     You may get as much as $200 or so as a first guess.

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There's not a lot of demand for these old players, so they don't always command a high price.  But there are enthusiasts and collectors out there, the challenge is to find them.  If you find someone who is interested and will appreciate it for themselves, I would accept what you can get (within reason) and be pleased that it's going to a good home.  There are a number of gramophone forums/websites around, and I have a recollection of one or two in Australia.  They may be able to give you additional advice. 

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23 minutes ago, aussievintage said:

I have two that I purchased in really sad condition and have restored one of them.  So, I have a bit of an idea of the market for bad examples, and what it costs to restore them.  Does it really work well?  Does it play at least a full 10" record without slowing down?

 

Brand name matters of course, especially for rare machines.   Do I see some rust on the external latches and winding handle?     You may get as much as $200 or so as a first guess.

Thanks @aussievintage for your reply, yes there is some surface rust / tarnish on the handle etc I played a record 1/2 way through with no drama’s so I will need to find a manufacturer and play a couple of records all the way to be sure it’s still 100%

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11 minutes ago, audiofeline said:

There's not a lot of demand for these old players, so they don't always command a high price.  But there are enthusiasts and collectors out there, the challenge is to find them.  If you find someone who is interested and will appreciate it for themselves, I would accept what you can get (within reason) and be pleased that it's going to a good home.  There are a number of gramophone forums/websites around, and I have a recollection of one or two in Australia.  They may be able to give you additional advice. 

And Thank you @audiofeline for your help too, I will try to google them and go from there.

The lady Owner would love to see it go to a loving that’s for sure.

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I got a little more info, she seems to remember the player being HMV (still not sure on model) fairly certain it was purchased in France,  it was supposed to be for her younger brother who is now in palliative care.

They moved to Australia in 1949 and quite possibly there are close to 100 records (I can’t verify that yet) some are single sided.

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The international gramophone groups would probably be able to give info given that it was purchased in Europe.  All the pics of HMV players I've seen have had a logo on, so she may be recalling a more generic name for it (as some were generically known as Victrola's, even though that was a specific brand/model). 

 

The single-sided disks would be quite early.  I recall reading that one company took out a patent on pressing double-sided disks, forcing other companies to issue single-sided disks (a case of an indefensible patent being used for corporate greed).  Eventually the other companies called the bluff, and started to press double-sided disks, in the hope that they wouldn't be taken to court and face legal costs to challenge the rubbish patent (fortunately none were taken to court for this).   Many had etchings on the non-playable side, of the company's name or logo, eg. the Angel logo -

Gramophone_Co_Trademark.jpg

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