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Scratched Records

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Cue the Theremins with dramatic sci-fi theme music.

 

I suggest you store your (currently) beyond salvation records in cryo. At some future date, with updated tech, they may actually be recoverable.

 

Surely it's not entirely incredulous? Hmmm, perhaps I can create a facility (not completely unlike, but much more robust than, the failed "Murfie" model)

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35 minutes ago, Uncle Seth said:

Cue the Theremins with dramatic sci-fi theme music.

 

I suggest you store your (currently) beyond salvation records in cryo. At some future date, with updated tech, they may actually be recoverable.

 

Surely it's not entirely incredulous? Hmmm, perhaps I can create a facility (not completely unlike, but much more robust than, the failed "Murfie" model)

Had digital not taken over the audio world, it may have been possible. 

 

Decades ago coinciding when digital CDs were introduced, innovating turntable technology was developed that used lasers to read the modulations in a record's groove, thus replacing styli and making a contact-less playback system.  Lasers are now commonly used in idustry to determine the composition of materials for sorting (eg, plastics recycling).  Had the laser turntable continued to be developed past the first versions, I would have predicted that expanded technology may have been able to detect and ignore material on the record surface that is not record vinyl (eg. dirt).  In the 70's there were a number of "impulse noise remover" devices designed to filter out dirt/scratches in records (reportedly not as good as the current digital editing software results).  This technology may have improved and also incorporated into high-tech laser-based turntables. 

 

Unfortunately, new turntables are now mass-produced reproductions of classic basic turntable design, or expensive boutique offerings.  Since the introduction of digital audio there has been comparatively little innovation and development in turntable technology.

 

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24 minutes ago, audiofeline said:

Had digital not taken over the audio world, it may have been possible. 

 

Decades ago coinciding when digital CDs were introduced, innovating turntable technology was developed that used lasers to read the modulations in a record's groove, thus replacing styli and making a contact-less playback system.  Lasers are now commonly used in idustry to determine the composition of materials for sorting (eg, plastics recycling).  Had the laser turntable continued to be developed past the first versions, I would have predicted that expanded technology may have been able to detect and ignore material on the record surface that is not record vinyl (eg. dirt).  In the 70's there were a number of "impulse noise remover" devices designed to filter out dirt/scratches in records (reportedly not as good as the current digital editing software results).  This technology may have improved and also incorporated into high-tech laser-based turntables. 

 

Unfortunately, new turntables are now mass-produced reproductions of classic basic turntable design, or expensive boutique offerings.  Since the introduction of digital audio there has been comparatively little innovation and development in turntable technology.

 

Would I require a Laser turntable to start my venture, and would I be able to kick off with an older model?

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2 hours ago, Uncle Seth said:

Would I require a Laser turntable to start my venture [storing trashed records until future technology is developed to make them playable], and would I be able to kick off with an older model?

There are not many models, mainly prototypes and the ELP (no relation to Emerson, Lake and Palmer/Powell).  The ELP was (and still is) available to purchase (not cheap), their 1997 model was updated in 2016.  Apparently they reproduce damage/dirt extremely accurately, so they really require excellent condition records.  However, they were marketed to museums and archivists to preserve damaged recordings.   The Absolute Sound (2008), in describing it's sound, said "it makes every disc sound the same. If I were to describe its presentation in a few words, they would be “pleasant but dull.” 

 

Irene is another contact-less record player, developed from technology to detect the Higgs-Boson (yes, rocket science).  It essentially converts a photographic image of the grooves for image analysis and conversion to audio.  It can be used with different types of records (eg. microgroove, 78's, lateral cut disks, cylinder disk, etc). 

 

More reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_turntable

http://www.elpj.com/

http://www.theabsolutesound.com/articles/elp-lt-1lrc-laser-turntable/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IRENE_(technology)

 

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