Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Ken

Another question on Australian mains power

Recommended Posts

A general question on mains power.

 

Most of my equipment is the standard 230 Volt, however I still have the odd piece that is 240 volt, if using a machine like a Thor PS-10 which will limit voltage output to either 240 volt or 220 volt, which setting would you recommend.

 

What would be the consequence of running equipment constantly 10 to 20 volts under voltage.

 

Ken

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing really changed.  The 240 to 230 voltage standard change was mostly a "soft" change and is within spec for most equipment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not run it at 240v? The equipment has no problem running 10% over the recommended voltage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

240 is fine. Check the output of your wall sockets. Will be somewhere between 225-245 anyway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


The secondary AC  voltages developed downstream will be lower if you are powering at 220v, ostensibly your Thor PS10 is the equivalent of a Variac .   

 

The secondary AC voltages then being lower will result in the DC circuitry and that DC circuitry's  regulators like the very popular LM317  https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/lm317.pdf  having slightly less headroom. The small reduction to 220v is though unlikely to be problematic in most cases, and would IMO be allowable if we studied the input to output differential operating conditions for each type of regulator.  

 

More modern devices, if your equipment used these  like the AMS1117 regulator, allow even lower I/O differential and these fall under a type called a LDO which stands for Low dropout Regulator - I/O with these is 1v   http://www.advanced-monolithic.com/pdf/ds1117.pdf

 

If wanting or needing to study each piece of equipment's  schematics,   Hifi engine is a good resource  https://www.hifiengine.com

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, anewmission said:

225-245 anyway

 

Lucky you.  Have you checked your situation?  There are have been many posts on SNA over time where some situations where approaching the mid 260 volts and even higher.  Mine reached 262 volts before the supplier changed the taps on the supply transformer after I reported the the problem and the supply is now about 235 volts.

 

I have a conditioner for my whole house.  When it was installed the default was 220 volts.  There is a 4 volt drop in the house so the audio system received 216 volts. Wonderful SQ but fans and drills did not start.  The default was adjusted to 230 volts.  I cannot change it.  The SQ is still good but my memory tells me otherwise.

 

The higher the voltage the greater the running costs and the shorter life span of all electrical appliances.  For example, with the 260 odd voltage the LED lights often lasted months.  For example I have not replaced a LED light for two years since the drop to supply was 235 volts and I have the house conditioner.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Ken,

I should have also said in my post above to try both settings for the Thor and decide if there is a difference and which you prefer.  You are in WA that has a reputation for poor power quality compared to the rest of Australia not that quality of the power in the the rest country is as good as it could be.  Power quality is a topic for another day and there will be some who disagree. 

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Assisi said:

 

Lucky you.  Have you checked your situation?  There are have been many posts on SNA over time where some situations where approaching the mid 260 volts and even higher.  Mine reached 262 volts before the supplier changed the taps on the supply transformer after I reported the the problem and the supply is now about 235 volts.

 

I have a conditioner for my whole house.  When it was installed the default was 220 volts.  There is a 4 volt drop in the house so the audio system received 216 volts. Wonderful SQ but fans and drills did not start.  The default was adjusted to 230 volts.  I cannot change it.  The SQ is still good but my memory tells me otherwise.

 

The higher the voltage the greater the running costs and the shorter life span of all electrical appliances.  For example, with the 260 odd voltage the LED lights often lasted months.  For example I have not replaced a LED light for two years since the drop to supply was 235 volts and I have the house conditioner.

 

John

Yeh I just checked with my mm 241 on everything downstairs

I might chuck a really long extension lead in tomorrow and see if it changes. 

My next door neighbour is a long time sparky, he's hooked me up.

I just use an rfi emi blocker and soon to add a dc blocker. 

 

I should probably check the output of the rfi/emi blocker also as all eight outputs from that is feeding my system. 

 

I posted in another thread, I just changed out my dacs power supply, basically just a phone 5v 2a charger.. USB into the Dac 5v input with a portable phone charger. 

The different was sooooo unbelievable. Unfortunately I can't charge the portable charger at the same time as using it. 

I'm still shocked and wondering why it made such a difference

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


If you have gear made for the european market at 230V, run it at 220. If you have dedicated Australian versions of hardware made for 240, run it at 240. Power amps that were not specifically designed for the Australian market have been known to blow caps when run with our high voltage from the grid which often drifts up closer to 250V still.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have valve gear then I would strongly recommend 220V. Those high voltage capacitors and valves often have little leeway in tolerance to play with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ittaku said:

If you have gear made for the european market at 230V, run it at 220. If you have dedicated Australian versions of hardware made for 240, run it at 240. Power amps that were not specifically designed for the Australian market have been known to blow caps when run with our high voltage from the grid which often drifts up closer to 250V still.

Then set the Thor PS to 220V.  With audio or entertainment gear, I doubt one will ever fail to work at 220VAC.  However I have experienced where devices that run purely on AC such as motor etc like @Assisi has experienced in his post that when the supply falls below 220 somethings that run purely on AC 240V will fail to crank over.   All audio gear have step down to DC whether it be a linear or switch mode psu. 

You are correct that some manufacturer have deployed caps that are right in the limit of there DC spec for the DC rail.  This puts the caps on notice for reliability issues, leaking, overheating etc  ... I’ve already replaced an entire bank of 100Vdc 10,000uf to 120VDC 8200uf  as per requested from the manufacturer, why the lower capacity UF value?  Realestate takes president, can only fit this in that space. 

Using caps that have Max DC that equals the rail voltage is a cost saving gain, not that it’s not designed for Australian condition... it’s false economics....  however many manufacturers do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Addicted to music said:

Using caps that have Max DC that equals the rail voltage is a cost saving gain, not that it’s not designed for Australian condition... it’s false economics....  however many manufacturers do it.

Really bad.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


1 hour ago, Addicted to music said:

With audio or entertainment gear, I doubt one will ever fail to work at 220VAC.

I agree with this.  I think there is some unnecessary worry going on here about the actual voltage.  Not saying you'll never have problems, but by and large, most equipment is well enough built to cope with these variations.  The problems usually come when something is built for a different standard,  say 220V and we use it on our 230V system, which can often rise above 240V and still be within tolerance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Muon N'

Mine here was a steady 250vac at the wall, my valve amp that has a 240vac power transformer runs as it should now they have corrected it and I have a variation between 238 and 242v at the wall.

 

Edit: previously the heaters of the tubes would have had 10% more applied to them, not good for tube life, and when the mains is altered so are the secondaries and that alters the operating points in the circuit design.

Edited by Muon N'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...