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DANIEL_D

Turntables choices AT-Lp5 or lpw40wn

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Hey guys,

 

Im pretty new to turntables. Looking at getting my first one and currently deciding between the AT-LP5 and LPW40WN (around $500-$800)

 

Not sure if should I go with the direct-drive or the belt drive, or if there is even any difference in this price range.

 

Any thoughts on those please?

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Welcome Daniel......to Stereonet!

 

I'm no expert and others here may have more knowledgeable opinions to share but based on the fact that I can find many glowing reviews on the LP5 and no reviews at all for the LPW40WN, I would say the LP5 is the way to go. Judging by said reviews you may be very happy with the LP5 which seems to be a great 'bang for buck' TT. This is not to say the other one is not going to make you happy either but the LP5 definitely impresses the reviewers in the articles I've seen so far.

 

WhatHiFi sums up their LP5 review with:

For

  • Loads of detail
  • Spacious soundstage
  • Expressive rhythmically and dynamically
  • Great to use
  • Feature list

Against

  • Nothing at this price

 

Impressive.....

 

Hopefully some others with more experience of these decks will offer a bit more of an accurate comparison/opinion.....

 

Good luck.👍

Edited by stevoz

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For the money a second hand purchase will get you a lot better TT and being your first if you do enjoy you will be tempted to upgrade, you will loose less on the second hand purchase, a few weeks ago in the classifieds you would have been spoiled for choice 

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37 minutes ago, Powerglide said:

For the money a second hand purchase will get you a lot better TT and being your first if you do enjoy you will be tempted to upgrade, you will loose less on the second hand purchase, a few weeks ago in the classifieds you would have been spoiled for choice 

I think this is ultimately great advice but I'd like to offer another perspective based on my experience over the last ten years. I decided to get back into vinyl and I was immediately drawn to vintage Japanese direct drive decks because many of the systems I loved listening to in the 80's were built around these.

 

I bought a few different vintage TTs in various different conditions and they each had a minor problem or drawback that prevented me from being able the just enjoy listening to the music.  I didn't have enough knowledge or time to fix the glitches so I remained frustrated.

 

Please note, none of these glitchy turntables were bought from the awesome sellers on this forum, so you would probably have better luck buying here than I did elsewhere.

 

Eventually I bought a well reviewed, brand new, turntable. It cost me around $500. It was really easy to set up, came with clear instructions and worked perfectly out of the box.

 

This simple, reliable TT gave me many hours of happy listening and reignited my love for vinyl. About a year later I was back on the upgrade path and buying good quality vintage Japanese decks, but now I had a clearer idea of the sound and reliability I was looking for.

 

So, I agree that there are some amazing bargains and lots of awesome sellers on this forum. Many will be happy to give advice in setting up your TT and helping you get the most out of it. On the other hand, a new deck, with full warranty and support from a credible retailer and manufacturer can be an excellent, hassle-free introduction to the world of vinyl.

 

I still have the turntable I bought new and I could probably sell it for around half of what I paid for it, or keep it to use in a second system so the economics are OK given the hours of enjoyment I got out of it.

 

The only other things I would add are:

1. Decide if you want a dust cover/lid. Many turntables don't come with them and lots of audiophiles don't bother with them but personally I prefer them. Maybe I'm dust phobic...

2. Fully manual turntables may have some sonic advantages but I do like an autolift, autostop or auto return because I often get distracted and with manual tables have come back up to 18 hours later to find the platter still spinning and the stylus slowly wearing down.

 

Good luck and enjoy your vinyl journey.

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10 hours ago, curtankerous said:

I think this is ultimately great advice but I'd like to offer another perspective based on my experience over the last ten years. I decided to get back into vinyl and I was immediately drawn to vintage Japanese direct drive decks because many of the systems I loved listening to in the 80's were built around these.

 

I bought a few different vintage TTs in various different conditions and they each had a minor problem or drawback that prevented me from being able the just enjoy listening to the music.  I didn't have enough knowledge or time to fix the glitches so I remained frustrated.

 

Please note, none of these glitchy turntables were bought from the awesome sellers on this forum, so you would probably have better luck buying here than I did elsewhere.

 

Eventually I bought a well reviewed, brand new, turntable. It cost me around $500. It was really easy to set up, came with clear instructions and worked perfectly out of the box.

 

This simple, reliable TT gave me many hours of happy listening and reignited my love for vinyl. About a year later I was back on the upgrade path and buying good quality vintage Japanese decks, but now I had a clearer idea of the sound and reliability I was looking for.

 

So, I agree that there are some amazing bargains and lots of awesome sellers on this forum. Many will be happy to give advice in setting up your TT and helping you get the most out of it. On the other hand, a new deck, with full warranty and support from a credible retailer and manufacturer can be an excellent, hassle-free introduction to the world of vinyl.

 

I still have the turntable I bought new and I could probably sell it for around half of what I paid for it, or keep it to use in a second system so the economics are OK given the hours of enjoyment I got out of it.

 

The only other things I would add are:

1. Decide if you want a dust cover/lid. Many turntables don't come with them and lots of audiophiles don't bother with them but personally I prefer them. Maybe I'm dust phobic...

2. Fully manual turntables may have some sonic advantages but I do like an autolift, autostop or auto return because I often get distracted and with manual tables have come back up to 18 hours later to find the platter still spinning and the stylus slowly wearing down.

 

Good luck and enjoy your vinyl journey.

Great advise....... Just a point of interest you mentioned fully manual turntables when it comes to the end of playing the record.I have just purchased and yet to set up my new Manual turntable I have been looking at these add on devices to lift the tone arm and save ware on your expensive cartridge found this brand maybe just one of many any thoughts..

Q UP Automatic Tonearm Lifter

Safely lifts your tonearm at the end of the record

Cheers.🎶🎵🎶

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The ATLP5 is a very good deck - have not heard the other model.

 

In general - well designed/good direct drive decks (like ATLP5) have a great sense of rhythm and timing and tight bass with good dynamics - especially great for any music that relies on drums and rhythms and large dynamic swings.

 

Belt drives generally sound a bit more laid back/smoother but perhaps are not quite as dramatically dynamic (at least at this price).

 

With this in mind - I would go the ATLP5 (I listen to mainly electronic, rock and pop with a dose of jazz and world).

 

You may prefer the belt drive folk if your listening is predominantly mellow jazz, lounge and female vocals - it tends to be a tad softer/warmer.

 

Your choice of cartridge and phono stage will make way more audible difference than the two different turntables (all things otherwise being equal).

 

:)

Edited by Douglas HiFi

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A Reloop RP7000 Mk2 is a killer table at around $560.

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