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For the first time, I have a dedicated room for HT and Gaming and I have finally finished the acoustic treatment of the room. To create this space of 3.4 x 4.9 x 2.5 meter, I had to move the laundry, toilet and bathroom and knock some walls down. Yes…….. the missus really, really loves me.

 

I had a look at soundproofing the room but decided to not go through with that idea, because the room was rather smallish to begin with and the build a bit complicated, with all the different walls and joist intersecting with each other and with the rest of the house. The room has a double brick outer wall with an air gap in between it,  as the front and the right wall. The front wall also has a window in it behind the AT screen. The left wall is a solid double brick internal wall. The ceiling has a couple of 200mm exposed roof joist with some timber on top, 100mm insulation and a flat sheet metal roof. The back wall is newly constructed and is made out of 17mm plywood with 10mm gyprock on top, on both sides, with insulation in between. And the floor is a solid concrete slab.

 

This room is rather solid and therefor rather challenging regarding bass issues. All treatment is DIY, and the total material cost for acoustic treatment is around $1100 AUD.

The screen wall is a timber frame held up by corner (bass trapping) towers, resting on top of the floor boards, and locked into place by screwing it into the roof joists. It is sitting 550mm from the front wall and is basically functioning as one giant bass absorption trap with 50mm Autex High Density insulation. The wall around the screen has been finished with 6mm MDF sheets with a RPG binary pattern as a finish, and to bring some reflections back into the room. The area behind the AT screen is fully covered in insulation, except for the center speaker. The coverage of unexposed absorption of the front wall is roughly 60%.  This improved clarity and sound stage a lot. It also helped with decay rates in the bass frequency. Enough to improve bass clarity, but not enough to even out the decay rate over the full LF frequency range.

 

The bulk heads around the ceiling have been added on later and consist out of 10mm gyprock with more insulation behind them. The rest of the ceiling has been covered in a binary slat pattern that is hung from the 200mm exposed roof joist, and the space between the roof joist has been filled with more insulation again. The coverage of unexposed absorption on the ceiling is roughly 38% I found that this improved stage depth the most.

The back of the room has been treated with panels made from the same 6mm MDF binary pattern and Autex insulation and have been mounted at various distances from the wall, 50-100-150mm. I had the mount one on a hinge as it was covering the door. I found this to be a big improvement in clarity and precision of tracking in sound effects.

 

Thanks to clever placement of subwoofers and listen position I have been able to create a LF response for subs and full range front speakers,  without any nulls and only need to cut off peaks to receive a flat SPL response. The frequency response of the decay times is less than flat due to the rooms solid build, but doesn’t kick in for the first 20ms, which isn’t too bad.

 

All in all I am quite happy with the outcome, but isn’t my best work regarding finish, as I have favored speed instead of a quality finish.

 

HT_Room-2.jpg

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HT_Room-7.jpg

Edited by Primare Knob
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For the first time, I have a dedicated room for HT and Gaming and I have finally finished the acoustic treatment of the room. To create this space of 3.4 x 4.9 x 2.5 meter, I had to move the laundry,

It has taken me some time as I had this planned a lot sooner, but I finally found the time to build my own subwoofers. It has been a nice project, although the bamboo floor boards used for the outer s

Thanks. I am still planning on building new subs, that are externally powered by an amp. I should be able to run the speaker cable through some channels on top of the skirts, and with a bit of paint

Floor rug?
No thanks?

Don't really need one as clarity is as good as it is, and decay times are short enough.

As a general rule you can treat opposite areas/walls with 25% absorbtion per area/wall or go 50% on one area/wall, without taking the live out of a room. Considering the sofa on the floor and the ceiling coverage I think I am pretty close to that.
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  • 2 weeks later...

I am using a bit of an unconventional setup, as I was being fed up with the devaluation of AV gear and it's SQ performance.

I am using a HT/Gaming PC with a Pro Audio multichannel AD/DA converter straight into a couple of 2 channel power amps. I found that by ditching the AV Pre Pro I could get the 2-8 channel SQ I was after in a multichannel setup.

It is not the most family friendly setup, and I miss out on Dolby Atmos or DTS-X as that isn't supported for the PC, but I don't really miss the extra channels at this point either, but whatever the future holds, I can easily upgrade the DA converter and add more channels, or add a cheap video card with the latest HDMI specs when needed.

All DSP and volume control is done at the source in the digital domain. The PC is setup for quiet performance with water cooling and passive/active components that only activate under high load, which is during gaming.

All movies (400+) are stored on a local media server as uncompressed full BD rips.

I am still planning to build a set of 15" subwoofers to replace the 12" that I use now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Room looks great! good outcome with the ceiling 😉

 

Nice to see another hard floor without the need for a rug or carpet. So much better in my opinion. Presumably you get a bit of screen reflection though?

Edited by Peter the Greek
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Presumably you get a bit of screen reflection though?


I can't really say, but probably. The black bars have become blacker, still not to the level of the screen surrounding. The walls are reflecting some as well.
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Now thats a HT room I would love to replicate! Without doubt up there as one of the best I've seen in Australia over the journey, congrats on the planning and execution, not a hair out of place by the looks.

 

Form and function nailed and the contrasting finishes looks superb!

 

Shame about the sub cables though, bet that does your head in!

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Now thats a HT room I would love to replicate! Without doubt up there as one of the best I've seen in Australia over the journey, congrats on the planning and execution, not a hair out of place by the looks.
 
Form and function nailed and the contrasting finishes looks superb!
 
Shame about the sub cables though, bet that does your head in!
Thanks.

I am still planning on building new subs, that are externally powered by an amp. I should be able to run the speaker cable through some channels on top of the skirts, and with a bit of paint it should be fine.

If I can manage to deal with a 60Hz null by building some traps, I could hide the subs behind the soffit wall, which would be ideal.
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Looks great, happy watching. 

Where did you get the binary mdf from. Looks the goods

 

I got it from Bunnings........., MDF, Drill, Paint, etc.[emoji12] 

The panels are DIY and based upon the RPG binary pattern. If you google it, you will find some examples. Gearslutz has a lot of info as well.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=rpg+binary+pattern&client=firefox-b-m&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi-rem6qLPkAhW58HMBHaYoBWgQ_AUIBigB&biw=360&bih=560

 

 

They are very good in controlling reflections and decay time.

 

They start to be effective around 800Hz, and are fully effective from 1kHz and upwards.

 

There are different variations on the market like the wavewood (slats), and the artisan panels.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Primare Knob said:

I got it from Bunnings........., MDF, Drill, Paint, etc.emoji12.png 

The panels are DIY and based upon the RPG binary pattern. If you google it, you will find some examples. Gearslutz has a lot of info as well.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=rpg+binary+pattern&client=firefox-b-m&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi-rem6qLPkAhW58HMBHaYoBWgQ_AUIBigB&biw=360&bih=560

 

 

They are very good in controlling reflections and decay time.

 

They start to be effective around 800Hz, and are fully effective from 1kHz and upwards.

 

There are different variations on the market like the wavewood (slats), and the artisan panels.

 

 

 

Great effort that’s a lot of holes to drill, thought a CNC router would have been used.

 

again looks awesome! 👍🏼

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Great effort that’s a lot of holes to drill, thought a CNC router would have been used.

 

again looks awesome! [emoji1360]

I don't have the setup for that and looked into using a hand held router, but I don't think that they are meant for drilling, and it can be a bit harder to find center looking from above.

 

CNC would have given a nicer cut out and a cleaner pattern, but if you need to pay an external party, there is a big chance, it will work out the same as buying the panels in store. I never got a quote back for them, but I got a quote for the ceiling strips, which came down to $1100, for cutting and supply.

 

As I favoured speed, I drilled up to 8 X 6mdf panels with a hand drill, but doing this by hand will never guarantee a straight angle. This is fine for the first 2 panels, up to 4 is still fine, but more than 4 and you will start to clearly see the offset created by a non straight drill angle.

 

You could make a guide panel, but it would need to be 25mm thick or more, and made out of hard wood, and pre drilled with straight angles, and then you're back where you started.

 

The good thing is, that there are so many holes that you don't notice the offset to much, but by paying a bit of attention you can definitely pick them out.

 

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1 minute ago, Primare Knob said:

I don't have the setup for that and looked into using a hand held router, but I don't think that they are meant for drilling, and it can be a bit harder to find center looking from above.

CNC would have given a nicer cut out and a cleaner pattern, but if you need to pay an external party, there is a big chance, it will work out the same as buying the panels in store. I never got a quote back for them, but I got a quote for the ceiling strips, which came down to $1100, for cutting and supply.

As I favoured speed, I drilled up to 8 X 6mdf panels with a hand drill, but doing this by hand will never guarantee a straight angle. This is fine for the first 2 panels, up to 4 is still fine, but more than 4 and you will start to clearly see the offset created by a non straight drill angle.

You could make a guide panel, but it would need to be 25mm thick or more, and made out of hard wood, and pre drilled with straight angles, and then you're back where you started.

The good thing is, that there are so many holes that you don't notice the offset to much, but by paying a bit of attention and you can definitely pick them out.

Great going and agree outsourcing the CNC router work may have defeated the purpose unless you know a guy.

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Looks great!! can you expand a bit more on whats behind the front wall or a picture before you added diffuser panels. I read your description 3 times and am still not clear on it:blush:

The red lines are a timber frame that is resting on the floor, and locked into place by screwing into the skirting boards, and the ceiling timber joist.

 

The empty spaces are filled up with a high density black polymer insulation sheets (50mm thick), which is stiff enough to keep itself up by just squeezing it in.

 

They are then covered with 6mm MDF panel sheets with the RPG dot pattern, screwed into the timber frame.

 

I did something similar to the ceiling, I jammed sheets of insulation, inbetween the ceiling timber joists, and covered it with slats, that I pre made into 8 panels to make life easier.sketch-1567505827122.jpeg.6d859a5ef6fde12897879e7c39888314.jpegsketch-1567505818933.jpeg.476b5ebe9dde8df16aa6a923be33de2f.jpegtapatalk_1567504025143.jpeg.f2d5434dfc4ea2364cc69641cc94211f.jpegtapatalk_1567504019341.jpeg.c8dd0d117ef75e12c1db3d08465e400e.jpeg

 

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Ok, I think get it. one last dumb question , so its 50mm maximum thickness or multiple layers?
You can go thicker, but it doesn't really help much. You also have to be careful with going to thick, as it can become counter productive.

I have filled up the empty space in the corners with low density insulation, as this showed better results in measurements, compared to 100mm high density.
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1 minute ago, Primare Knob said:

You can go thicker, but it doesn't really help much. You also have to be careful with going to thick, as it can become counter productive.

I have filled up the empty space in the corners with low density insulation, as this showed better results in measurements, compared to 100mm high density.

Ok, interesting! dont have the measurements handy do you?

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Nice site, Will have to have a look at the other calculators. 

 

I can see you get higher absorption at certain frequencies with the 50mm but you also will have to deal with the troughs and on average there is slightly less absorption.  . In reality its hard to know what works better unless you try both options and measure (and listen) because you cant put all the details of your room in a calculator. Hmm has made me think about my absorption panels though.....

 

Congrats on a great looking (and I'm sure) sounding room!! and thanks for making me think about this.

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Nice site, Will have to have a look at the other calculators. 
 
I can see you get higher absorption at certain frequencies with the 50mm but you also will have to deal with the troughs and on average there is slightly less absorption.  . In reality its hard to know what works better unless you try both options and measure (and listen) because you cant put all the details of your room in a calculator. Hmm has made me think about my absorption panels though.....
 
Congrats on a great looking (and I'm sure) sounding room!! and thanks for making me think about this.
The calculator is using a 0 degree incidence, which isn't accurate in real life. If you switch to a random incidence, you'll see the throughs disappear. Theory and real live often don't add up, so only take this a guideline.

You can see that the throughs happen at every "half length frequency" step of the distance you choose from the wall. Roughly every 340Hz interval with settings of 500mm, which is the half way length of 680Hz aka 500mm.

The front corner of the room has HD(48kg/m3) insulation and LD insulation, and in between (screen and equipment space) there is only 50mm MD (32kg/m3).

I not only covered the front but also the sides and the height with 50mm HD and MD insulation at various distance from the side wall, floor and ceiling.
All absorber start working at frequency X, which is half the frequency of the wavelength related to the distance between wall and absorber.

You have to be carefully in your expectations and reading your measurements. The 500mm distance in my case doesn't do anything for the SPL response below 100Hz, where you need it the most, but the effect does show up in the decay rate and RT60 graphs. Sometimes it also has effect on the group delay if it happens to cure a SBIR effect.

I have mostly used the graphs dealing with decay and group delay regarding treatment. The SPL graph is good for digital EQ, and finding out which effect belongs to which problem.

But I still have lots to learn on measurements myself.
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  • 1 month later...
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  • 3 months later...

Hey bud. I designed & built a new home with a big home theatre room and am not happy with the acoustics of the room. There's slap echo and other resonances. And I'm finding the sound localising to be smeared.

Especially considering I've spent quite a bit of money already on equipment & room (with future plans to add another sub, upgrade the surround processor, add ceiling atmos speaker). What methods did you use to work out what & where to place your wall treatments & what insulation products did you use (aside from the mdf sheets)?

 

Also, I'm not clear on what those products are on your ceiling?

 

Thanks

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It has taken me some time as I had this planned a lot sooner, but I finally found the time to build my own subwoofers. It has been a nice project, although the bamboo floor boards used for the outer skin has proven to be challenging for my basic tools.

 

The result however is pleasing and more importantly according to plan regarding my goals and expectations. I don’t really know how loud the max is, as I haven’t pushed things to the extreme, but it can reach 115dB at -3dBFS down to 17Hz. Why it is starting to slope down quite rapidly starting at 17Hz I haven’t figured out yet. It slopes down by 8dB rather quick and then start to level out at the SPL when I run a sweep starting at 10Hz.

 

Due to acoustic treatment, sub placement and listen position the non EQ output isn’t too bad, and with a little EQ, I get a nice sloping curve which is +3dB at 20Hz. I haven’t EQ-ed the peak at 140Hz, as I cross over the subs at 80Hz with a 48dB/Octave slope.

My system is tuned to output 80dB at -20dBFS instead of the generic 85dB, as I never listen at 85dB because I find it simply too loud, and usually have the volume control sitting at 75dB.

 

The subs have the external dimension of 440mmx440mmx440mm, and uses timber legs to sit on top of a concrete paver (base) with rubber feet. I find this to work better on a floating floor instead of having them sit directly onto the floor.  I did the same thing for my main speakers.
They are made out of an 18mm MDF inner shell with 3D bracing, and are clad
ded with a 14mm bamboo flooring outer shell. They are externally powered by a Behringer iNuke power amp, which I still have to modify because the fans inside are too loud for quiet scenes. They weigh about 40KG each without the base.

 

Not sure yet what I want to do with the old subs, as I don’t have any placement options to smooth out the SPL levels, and don’t need the extra output level. I am considering to use them as Subs for bass management for all my other speakers except mains, but I have to do some research to see if there is any benefit in that, as I have to reconfigure my system to a 6.2 setup with 9 speakers. I haven’t tested yet to see if there is a down side to running the surround backs in mono compared to stereo.

 

 

Subs_-4.thumb.jpg.8a4203b94e410ccb49f819e2e166e9e4.jpgSubs_-1.thumb.jpg.447ad82c3ade9a2c641370fcd7f68064.jpgSubs_-2.thumb.jpg.92099f157149030ee76e7656410b2c7b.jpgSubs_-3.thumb.jpg.225e32e0bbd661b84aab4c7433336fc1.jpgSub-Build.thumb.jpg.c5e4f4f14558b373616989e5d120f36e.jpg1221824210_115dBdownto17HznoEQ.thumb.jpg.a235894ef81be7bd027c05605031b7c6.jpg2137651285_Sublevelsat-20dBFSwithminorEQ.thumb.jpg.f44b51992624de8bc4602dd168b16835.jpg471325784_Waterfallplotat-20dBFS.thumb.jpg.36e74d91b027d3820d0d0031822ee095.jpg360599688_Decaytimeat-20dBFS.thumb.jpg.02f6285c582e4db171c50b9c2b9952d9.jpg

Edited by Primare Knob
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On 18/02/2020 at 4:17 PM, elmura said:

Hey bud. I designed & built a new home with a big home theatre room and am not happy with the acoustics of the room. There's slap echo and other resonances. And I'm finding the sound localising to be smeared.

Especially considering I've spent quite a bit of money already on equipment & room (with future plans to add another sub, upgrade the surround processor, add ceiling atmos speaker). What methods did you use to work out what & where to place your wall treatments & what insulation products did you use (aside from the mdf sheets)?

 

Also, I'm not clear on what those products are on your ceiling?

 

Thanks

The methods I used are Research, Measurements, Try and Error. All my acoustics are based on the principle of absorption and random reflections (simplified diffusion). If you go about this yourself you need to do research to understand how and what works to which extend, then the best way to go about it is going step by step. Tackle one problem at the time, test-measure-listen-adjust-repeat. My ceiling is just a bunch of timber slats/strips with absorption behind it. You can use any kind of absorption, but the ones which gas flow values are know, are preferred, as you use that in (online) acoustic modeling software to give you rough estimates.

 

The acoustic forum is a good place to start your research as well as google. Your best weapon is to know what works, and why, or what doesn't work and why. There are general treatment ideas for theater rooms which you can use as a starting point, and adjust from there, test-measure-listen-adjust-repeat.

Edit: I forgot about Subwoofer placement and listen position, which can help out a great deal (for free), and some minor EQ at LFE levels where acoustic treatment is difficult.

Edited by Primare Knob
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10 hours ago, Primare Knob said:

It has taken me some time as I had this planned a lot sooner, but I finally found the time to build my own subwoofers. It has been a nice project, although the bamboo floor boards used for the outer skin has proven to be challenging for my basic tools.

 

The result however is pleasing and more importantly according to plan regarding my goals and expectations. I don’t really know how loud the max is, as I haven’t pushed things to the extreme, but it can reach 115dB at -3dBFS down to 17Hz. Why it is starting to slope down quite rapidly starting at 17Hz I haven’t figured out yet. It slopes down by 8dB rather quick and then start to level out at the SPL when I run a sweep starting at 10Hz.

 

Due to acoustic treatment, sub placement and listen position the non EQ output isn’t too bad, and with a little EQ, I get a nice sloping curve which is +3dB at 20Hz. I haven’t EQ-ed the peak at 140Hz, as I cross over the subs at 80Hz with a 48dB/Octave slope.

My system is tuned to output 80dB at -20dBFS instead of the generic 85dB, as I never listen at 85dB because I find it simply too loud, and usually have the volume control sitting at 75dB.

 

The subs have the external dimension of 440mmx440mmx440mm, and uses timber legs to sit on top of a concrete paver (base) with rubber feet. I find this to work better on a floating floor instead of having them sit directly onto the floor.  I did the same thing for my main speakers.
They are made out of an 18mm MDF inner shell with 3D bracing, and are clad
ded with a 14mm bamboo flooring outer shell. They are externally powered by a Behringer iNuke power amp, which I still have to modify because the fans inside are too loud for quiet scenes. They weigh about 40KG each without the base.

 

Not sure yet what I want to do with the old subs, as I don’t have any placement options to smooth out the SPL levels, and don’t need the extra output level. I am considering to use them as Subs for bass management for all my other speakers except mains, but I have to do some research to see if there is any benefit in that, as I have to reconfigure my system to a 6.2 setup with 9 speakers. I haven’t tested yet to see if there is a down side to running the surround backs in mono compared to stereo.

 

 

Subs_-4.thumb.jpg.8a4203b94e410ccb49f819e2e166e9e4.jpgSubs_-1.thumb.jpg.447ad82c3ade9a2c641370fcd7f68064.jpgSubs_-2.thumb.jpg.92099f157149030ee76e7656410b2c7b.jpgSubs_-3.thumb.jpg.225e32e0bbd661b84aab4c7433336fc1.jpgSub-Build.thumb.jpg.c5e4f4f14558b373616989e5d120f36e.jpg1221824210_115dBdownto17HznoEQ.thumb.jpg.a235894ef81be7bd027c05605031b7c6.jpg2137651285_Sublevelsat-20dBFSwithminorEQ.thumb.jpg.f44b51992624de8bc4602dd168b16835.jpg471325784_Waterfallplotat-20dBFS.thumb.jpg.36e74d91b027d3820d0d0031822ee095.jpg360599688_Decaytimeat-20dBFS.thumb.jpg.02f6285c582e4db171c50b9c2b9952d9.jpg

Amazing mate, that room and subs look spectacular. Well done. 👍

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  • 3 months later...

It has been a while since my last update, but I have been playing around with 4 subs, and I turned my 7.2 setup into a 6.4 setup by sacrificing one surround back channel and turn it into a separate sub channel. I setup my main subs for LFE duty, my old subs for Bass Management for all speaker except Left and Right, and  turned my back surround speakers into two mono speakers.

 

I did set it up in such a way so that I could switch between my 6.4 setup and 7.2 setup for comparison. The extra subs do bring extra weight to the show, but this can also be achieved by dialing up the subs by +6dB. As long as the subs have the headroom to do this I could not pick one from the other reliably. Turning the back surrounds into two mono speakers did have more impact then anticipated.

With sound effects, I could pick one over the other if I really tried, but nothing that would spoil the soundtrack, or would be picked up while watching a movie, but the thing that always stood out in the 6.4 setup where the ambient sounds. They would pop out more and rather spoil the effect of the soundtrack.

 

Since I listen at -12.5 dBFS below reference, my subs have the headroom to be dialed up a bit more, and I am not a big fan of to much bass anyway so I have reverted back to the 7.2 setup again. I am limited to 8 channels at the moment which suite my purpose just fine. The other thing that I found during testing, and only listening to sub bass, was that frequencies below 20Hz are rather unpleasant to listen to, and cause quite a bit of pressure on the ears. I am now rolling off my subs with a rather steep slope down from 17Hz, as I could not distinguish the difference between any of the tones lower than that. This has planted the idea to introduce some bass shakers in the future, but this would require an additional cross over or adding some extra channels to the DA converter.

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What DA/AD convertor are you using? So, if I understand correctly, you have HTPC which is connected to DA/AD converter for audio out to amps and HDMI graphics card for video out to TV/Screen?

 

That is a neat HT Room. Very impressive.

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7 hours ago, :) Go Away (: said:

What DA/AD convertor are you using? So, if I understand correctly, you have HTPC which is connected to DA/AD converter for audio out to amps and HDMI graphics card for video out to TV/Screen?

 

That is a neat HT Room. Very impressive.

Thanks. You have got that correct idea about my setup.

 

I am using a Lynx Aurora N 8 channel AD/DA converter for the following reasons;

- It can handle up to 16 channels via USB (No additional equipment needed)

- It is expendable up to 32 channels via input modules

- It has a hardware switch to output at +4dBU (pro audio) or at -10dBV (hifi) (good for level matching with different Power Amp input sensitivities)

- Hifi quality DA converter (compared it with my Bryston BDA-2 )

- Good amount of output voltage

- Can make recordings via USB onto SD-Card (fun to have bonus)

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Primare Knob said:

Thanks. You have got that correct idea about my setup.

 

I am using a Lynx Aurora N 8 channel AD/DA converter for the following reasons;

- It can handle up to 16 channels via USB (No additional equipment needed)

- It is expendable up to 32 channels via input modules

- It has a hardware switch to output at +4dBU (pro audio) or at -10dBV (hifi) (good for level matching with different Power Amp input sensitivities)

- Hifi quality DA converter (compared it with my Bryston BDA-2 )

- Good amount of output voltage

- Can make recordings via USB onto SD-Card (fun to have bonus)

 

 

Thank you for the information. I had the similar thought but didn't know of AD/DA convertor, in fact I started out building my HTPC but it ended up being Really really really expensive home server. 

I will have to look back into that. Would you say this is a better solution than AVR or Pre/Pro? Rest I would assume is being handled at software level.

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      Photos:
       





    • By Geoff Millar
      Item Condition: As new: Opened for Testing Shipping Options: Shipping is included in price. Suburb or Town: Brunswick State: Victoria Payment Method: Paypal Reason for selling: Surplus to requirements Further information: A pair of as-new Dayton (Parts Express) DC160-8 "Classic" series coated paper woofers, detailed specs attached.
       
      Dayton's Classic DC160 is a very smooth sounding woofer, used in a range of DIY projects such as Paul Carmody's "Classix II" TM and 2.5TMM, the "Dayton III" MTM and the "Affordable Accuracy Monitor" TM.
      Excellent bass for a 6" woofer, sounds particularly good with music which is less well recorded, such as 60s pop/rock.
       
      I use them in the Classix II with a VIFA BC25TG tweeter(photo of amateur looking cabinet att.), which are great speakers for the price.
       
      Use a second order crossover  at about 2,000 Hz and a Zobel across the woofer. These have been opened and tested but not otherwise used. Price includes Australia Post standard and tracking.
      used.
       
      Summary specs:
       
      Impedance 8 ohms
      FS 35.7 Hz
      Qts 0.34
      SD 134.8
      VAS 17.9l
      SPl 86.1 dB@2.83v/1m
      RMS Power handling 50 watts
      Xmax3.15mm
      Reason for sale: too many speakers!
       
      Photos:
       
      PLEASE READ
      If you are advertising multiple items, you must post one bulk price only, or post seperate ads for each item If you include any reference to pricing whatsoever in this section (excluding RRP), your ad will not be approved If you don't include photographs of the actual item being sold, your ad will not be approved

      295-305-dayton-audio-dc160-8-specifications-46146.pdf
    • By Sansui77
      During this pandemic I've had more time to get things done around the house including sorting out some speaker crossovers issues. These diy speakers were built by my old-school teacher and somehow they ended up in my hands. Originally they were setup with active crossovers but were changed back to a passive setup. Unfortunately, the crossovers were slapped together but still sounded great. Me being me I had to sort it out. I also decided to upgrade with better spec components still using the hand wound inductors. Performed a freq sweep and even though they look pretty good they needed tweeking. With a few adjustments with my super HD hearing lol, they still have that nice punchy bottom end detailed midrange. The big improvement is how detailed and cleaner the top end is now and not rolled off so quickly. The super tweeter crossover is not added in this circuit but will be built and installed seperately as I want to have a db attenuation stepper allowing you to set and control how the SB Acoustics supertweeter is outputted. Once all the testing are done, a full rewire internally, redo the acoustic material then redo - paint the cabinets. 
       
      For DIY speakers, they're impressive 😉
       

    • By Rocknrollthor
      Tube amplifier homemade? With this post, I would like to advise all of you who believe that output transformers must be purchased that there is an alternative. Purchasing or reusing 'lacqer-insulated' copper wire can be used to make your own output transformer with the help of a computer program created by Yves Monmagnon. Here are two videos where I first make a chatode biased amplifier, then rebuild it into a fixed biased amplifier. In the last video, each tube is checked to be adjusted, and then the entire amplifier is benchmarked with the help of an ocilloscope and RMS voltmeter.
      Here is the two videos of the amp build and testing:
       

      some pics from the 'hifi central':

      https://www.hifisentralen.no/forumet/threads/2x15w-el34-pp-med-ul-opt-selvbygget.88291/

      here is a free google drive link to the program I used to calculate the OPT's:

      https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dzfxdD_2FrEn5WLOeuQDUsqWwd_aUbpS/view?usp=sharing

      Take care, and thanks!
    • By Geoff Millar
      Item Condition: Used, but near new as only tested Shipping Options: Shipping is available at agreed cost. Suburb or Town: Brunswick State: Victoria Payment Method: Paypal Reason for selling: Surplus to requirements Further information:
       
      Pair of Peerless SDS Paper Cone woofers, tested but as new condition.  Good sounding woofers, suitable for 2 or 3 way DIY project, I tested them with a VIFA BC25TG tweeter in a two way, but they are also used in Paul Carmody's well known "Tarkus" 3 way DIY design.
       
      Surface mount so no countersinking required.
       
      Manufacturer supplied specs: 88.2 dB (1w/1m), Fs: 45 Hz, QTS: 0.46, VAS 30.7l, Xmax: 3.46mm
       
      Surplus to requirements, I have too many drivers. 
       
      Photos:
       
      PLEASE READ
      If you are advertising multiple items, you must post one bulk price only, or post seperate ads for each item If you include any reference to pricing whatsoever in this section (excluding RRP), your ad will not be approved If you don't include photographs of the actual item being sold, your ad will not be approved





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