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cultfilman

Cricket Season 2019/20.

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It will be all over before tea. More than enough time against a demoralised outfit.

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Scoring rates are making the difference & making a result possible. I know it's not considered to be proper test batting at over 3 rpo. the English batted at 2.7 rpo in their first dig. Proper test batting in probably the best conditions of the match The Australians 3.52 in the first & 4.35 in the second. Poking & defensive prodding, which will be the English way tomorrow, only leads to a certain demise.

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Burns wasn't so lucky this dig. Good short ball by Paddy.

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I'll need to eat humble pie after bagging Wade, that was a good innings from the little bloke yesterday.

All the talk is of a Cardiff like escape in the English press, who knows maybe they can. 

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Here's a good article you might like on Wade from Daniel Brettig(always pens a good story)

 

 

Matthew Wade's Edgbaston century, a sparkling collection of attacking shots with a sturdy enough defence to survive, was an innings played unashamedly on his own terms. It was also an innings that quite a lot of prominent judges in Australian cricket would not have allowed him the chance to play.

 

One of the curious things about the rash of changes in Australian cricket following the Newlands scandal was the return of a couple of very recent national selectors to commentary roles. Mark Waugh, via Fox Sports, and Darren Lehmann, via the same network and also Macquarie radio, have been very outspoken in close proximity to their former spots alongside Trevor Hohns and Greg Chappell - Lehmann succeeded as coach by Justin Langer, and Waugh not replaced.

Among the strongest opinions expressed, via these outlets and also social media, was Waugh's that Matthew Wade's time as a Test cricketer for Australia was over. Wade hadn't made anywhere near enough runs for Australia in his most recent stint, the theory went, and he was too vulnerable to the moving ball. He should be considered for limited overs games, on the strength of his BBL displays for Hobart Hurricanes, but not the Test team.

 

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With George Bailey sidelined through injury & Test captain Tim Paine available, Matthew Wade will play as specialist bat in Shield v SA. 4 or 5. Hope Trevor is watching @TheMercurySport #SheffieldShield

 

You seriously think Matthew Wade is a test match no.4 or 5 at 31 yrs of age. Has had a very good season and should be in the frame for white ball cricket but not red ball cricket. Has played 22 tests with a batting average of 28.

This view did not change even as Wade was regenerating himself as more of a specialist batsman than a utility gloveman, making technical and tactical changes in Tasmania through the help of the noted batting coach Jeff Vaughan, and also reassessing his personality and mentality through the prism of fatherhood and a growing maturity. Why there was such fixed opposition to Wade, with references made to him being too old at 31 to make a return, has been a source of curiosity.

But what is far less debatable is the fact that when Waugh and Lehmann were on the panel, they were part of a decision to choose Wade that had less to do with how the left-hander was performing at the time, and more to do with the state of panic in which Australian cricket then found itself. In November 2016, when the call was made to drop Peter Nevill and replace him with Wade, Australia had lost five Tests in a row, the selection chairman Rod Marsh had resigned, and the strong suggestion was that under a new captain in Steven Smith, Australia needed to be louder and more aggressive as a team, taking any means necessary to win.

Wade's recall, having not played a Test since 2013, epitomised this attitude shift more than anything, but it rather ignored the fact that in terms of performance, he was in the midst of the worst batting slump of his career. In the preceding Sheffield Shield season, Wade had made 167 runs at 27.83 with a top score of 41 not out, and in the one in which he was recalled, he returned just 113 at 28.25. These two seasons remain the least productive of Wade's first-class tenure since his very first all the way back in 2007-08.

So when Wade was thrust into the spotlight of Australian duty he was battling his own method and enthusiasm for the game, in the process of realising that a technique he had honed for years on the predictable MCG drop-in pitch was in need of augmentation if he was to be the high performing Test batsman that his talent always suggested he might be. Two centuries in his first international stint - against the West Indies in Dominica in 2012 and against Sri Lanka in Sydney in 2013 - both showed how good Wade could be, but they were displays he struggled to replicate in 2016 and 2017. Lehmann has, in recent times, conceded that Wade was not in a great frame of mind when chosen.

"In his last 10 Tests he did not have a great output but we played on some difficult wickets in the subcontinent," Lehmann told News Corp last month. "The big thing is he now believes in himself. He is playing more shots. (Previously) he was probably too fearful of getting out. Now he has released the shackles and said 'I am just going to play'. That is what happens when you get older. I remember Steve Waugh went for three or four years and did not want to get out but at the back-end of his career he played with more freedom."

That's not to say that Wade's performances were completely without merit - 196 runs at 32.66 in four Tests in India were creditable in a series Australia battled right to the finish. But when he offered only slim pickings in Bangladesh later in the year, Wade was discarded and clearly marked, by some at least, as never to play again. It was a decision compounded by the ructions of the Newlands scandal, for there had been few Australians more likely to agitate opponents than Wade had been.

But it was in accepting that he might not get another chance to play for Australia that Wade found the clarity he needed, something he spoke about eloquently on the day the Ashes squad was named in Southampton. All those who have seen Wade batting up close in recent months, scoring century upon century, have invariably reached the conclusion that he had to be included in Australia's best six batsmen for the Ashes, and he arguably sewed up a spot by making a century opposite Travis Head against the England Lions in Canterbury.

And it was in a similarly muscular, sure of himself vein that Wade played alongside Smith and Tim Paine on day four in Birmingham, clouting 17 boundaries and monstering anything that fell even remotely into his cover driving zone. On reflection, Wade was in no doubt that it had helped to be chosen when feeling sure of himself and his game.

Matthew Wade celebrates reaching his century Getty Images

"Weight of runs and time in the middle is everything for a batter so I certainly felt that my game was at a stage where I could perform at this level," Wade said. "It's as confident as I've been coming into a Test match for sure.

"That's the way we want it to be in Australia, we want guys piling on a lot of runs at first-class level to get an opportunity to play Test cricket, and when you get that opportunity you try and take it. So I felt confident in my game coming in, I'm at the age now where I know my game better than I did back then and playing as a specialist batter makes a difference as well, it takes a lot of pressure off you, you can chill a little bit more in the field and you're not concentrating for that long stretch of time like you do as a wicketkeeper. I've found that really good for my game.

"I'm confident in my game and if it doesn't work like it did in the first innings I still feel that on my day I'm good enough to score runs and I'm not chasing my tail as much as what I did when I was a younger player. I back my game now. Yeah, you've got to tinker a little bit here and there, but I certainly don't change too much."

While Smith's genius is beyond all dispute, there was far more conjecture to be had about the best players to keep him company and find runs in his slipstream. Perhaps the most telling description of Wade came not from a former selector, but a current one: Langer emphasised that Wade had done the time-honoured thing and simply made a truckload of runs, allied to a fighting countenance.

"I saw it during the summer, and we thought a real reward was being picked in the Australia A side because there was a lot of talk about Wadey and his form, and where he was batting and wicketkeeping," Langer said in Southampton. "And he just keeps doing it. He's got three hundreds on this tour already and I think he's batted six or seven times. He's doing everything that we've asked of Australian cricketers. He's making runs, he's making big runs, he's knocking that hard and he's got that look in his eye. Coming into a tough series like this, you like to see those sort of fighting instincts."

England saw those instincts on day four at Edgbaston, and they did not have much of an answer.

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These umps are having shockers. Root was probably lbw then. Very poorly played.
Wade played very well. Like a boxer, a batsmen can't just lean on the ropes and take the body blows. He has to get on the front foot and land few blows.
Challenging bowling this session.

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I’m calling it, now that Root is gone. Might still go to the third session but we have this one.

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I don't know how anyone could have imagined that the English could ha e survived the last day. I reckon we declared too early.

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7 down.
I’m pouring a celebratory scotch [emoji6][emoji106]
Good idea. Just wondering who might get the man of the match

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1 minute ago, mikey d said:
9 minutes ago, wolster said:
7 down.
I’m pouring a celebratory scotch emoji6.pngemoji106.png

Good idea. Just wondering who might get the man of the match

Might be that bloke who’s first and last name starts with The same letter

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Whoop whoop!! 😀👍

Recovering from 8 for 122 in first innings to win by 251 😀

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Don't you just love test cricket. More permutations than chaos theory. Glad we don't have to bat last
Yep, always tough batting last. All about attitude. Well played lads.

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7 hours ago, mikey d said:

I don't know how anyone could have imagined that the English could ha e survived the last day. I reckon we declared too early.

 

English weather is always a worry.

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Well that was a win for the ages.  Day 1 looked ominous for the Aussies and the hole that was dug was deep.  One man carried the team back in to the game, and then to victory.  Just brilliant, glad I didn't miss it.  It's a privilege to watch Steve Smith play French cricket.  Now all we need is Warner to hit his straps.

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Pleasure to watch, great to see everyone contributing, yes, S Smith has no fear. Interesting stat mentioned during the course of the test, he has averaged 100 in the first innings, in Test Cricket, for the last 6 years !!  Has the 2nd highest average in Test Cricket at the moment, behind Sir Donald.

Commentators are very good also, Athers, Nasser, Gower and Botham all very knowledgeable and don't dramatize. Just glad Healy and Slater aren't there commentating.

Our pace bowlers didn't give them anything, averaging mid 80mph pace on a 5th day pitch is remarkable. Testament to their ability and fitness, yes, they are professionals, however its always the inevitable, (trying to survive) and eventually succumb. Siddle and Pattinson deserved a wicket or two. 

Nathan Lyon just had to be patient, and sure enough the ball would land and turn in the right spot.

Good to shut some of that moronic crowd up.

 

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3 minutes ago, mattd2308 said:

Pleasure to watch, great to see everyone contributing, yes, S Smith has no fear. Interesting stat mentioned during the course of the test, he has averaged 100 in the first innings, in Test Cricket, for the last 6 years !!  Has the 2nd highest average in Test Cricket at the moment, behind Sir Donald.

Commentators are very good also, Athers, Nasser, Gower and Botham all very knowledgeable and don't dramatize. Just glad Healy and Slater aren't there commentating.

Our pace bowlers didn't give them anything, averaging mid 80mph pace on a 5th day pitch is remarkable. Testament to their ability and fitness, yes, they are professionals, however its always the inevitable, (trying to survive) and eventually succumb. Siddle and Pattinson deserved a wicket or two. 

Nathan Lyon just had to be patient, and sure enough the ball would land and turn in the right spot.

Good to shut some of that moronic crowd up.

 

Good comment. Yep, there are dyckheads in every country. We have our fair share for sure. Usually that sort of spectator rubbish is reserved for the one day/20-20 crowds. They had there fun but hopefully silenced now. At least we don't have to listen to the hyped up music between overs.

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Re the English commentators, occasionally I would listen to the radio broadcast, particularly late at night.

My signal to turn it off was whenever Boycott came on. How they still put up with his moranic comments is beyond me.

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It's on again, fellow enthusiasts. 

That's if the forecasted rain at Lords holds off today.

We will soon know. 

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Cats  n dogs falling out of the sky in London Town.

 

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16 minutes ago, wolster said:

Weather looking better for this evening 🙏

Yeah and I hope we win the toss and bat.  Strategy:  First idea:  That is how you win Test matches by being brave and batting first.  Second idea:  Get England toiling in the field for as long as we can since there are only 3 days between the Second and Third Test matches.

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Good first hour but I wished we had batted first and played Starc.

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1 hour ago, mikey d said:

Good first hour but I wished we had batted first and played Starc.

 

If we manage to win it, it will justify the way they've gone.

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