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45 minutes ago, Luc said:

Yes. Thought I'd seen pics of it actually. also for some reason I remember Randolph Scott playing tennis in long pants

Or maybe Big Bill Tilden.

images - 2019-06-13T223056.349.jpeg

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1 minute ago, mrbuzzardstubble said:

Or maybe Big Bill Tilden.

images - 2019-06-13T223056.349.jpeg

Geez he is a big lad isn't he!

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, mrbuzzardstubble said:

There are only 2 Grand Slam winners in the male category. American Don Budge won one and Rod Laver won 2. Laver could have possibly won more but wasn't allowed to compete for several years due to the fact that he'd turned pro. Only amateurs were allowed to compete. 

Edit: Laver won the last Grand Slam in '69 when the rules were changed to allow professionals to compete.

Hello Martin, of course it wasn't just Rod Laver as a professional who was not able to play those four slam tournaments, which were then amateur events. A couple of standouts for me is Ken Rosewall and Pancho Gonzales, both of whom dominated the professional ranks for many years and thus regarded as the best in the world for those years, however, they could not compete in the grand slam tournaments until 1968, when the game went open. I am a big fan of Ken Rosewall and a few brief stats about his career show that Ken turned pro at age 23 and he had 4 grand slam tournaments to his name at that time. He was not able to play those slams again until 1968 when he won the French that year, beating Laver in the final. He then went on to win another 3 slam tournaments, the last being the 1972 Australian Open at the age of 37. We will never know, but I often wonder how many grand slam tournament he would have won during that 11 year hiatus.

 

Cheers,

 

Keith

Edited by cheekyboy

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5 hours ago, cheekyboy said:

Hello Martin, of course it wasn't just Rod Laver as a professional who was not able to play those four slam tournaments, which were then amateur events. A couple of standouts for me is Ken Rosewall and Pancho Gonzales, both of whom dominated the professional ranks for many years and thus regarded as the best in the world for those years, however, they could not compete in the grand slam tournaments until 1968, when the game went open. I am a big fan of Ken Rosewall and a few brief stats about his career show that Ken turned pro at age 23 and he had 4 grand slam tournaments to his name at that time. He was not able to play those slams again until 1968 when he won the French that year, beating Laver in the final. He then went on to win another 3 slam tournaments, the last being the 1972 Australian Open at the age of 37. We will never know, but I often wonder how many grand slam tournament he would have won during that 11 year hiatus.

 

Cheers,

 

Keith

I saw a lot of that era's players towards the end of their careers in action. Rosewall, Roche, Gonzales, Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, John Newcombe etc. Unfortunately never got to see Hoad or Laver in action. I even saw Metallica's Lars Ulrich's father Torben play in the N.S.W Open at White City around 1971-1972.

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1 hour ago, mrbuzzardstubble said:

I saw a lot of that era's players towards the end of their careers in action. Rosewall, Roche, Gonzales, Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, John Newcombe etc. Unfortunately never got to see Hoad or Laver in action. I even saw Metallica's Lars Ulrich's father Torben play in the N.S.W Open at White City around 1971-1972.

Hello Martin,

 

Torben Ulrich was similar to Rosewall in that he played well into his late 30s and early 40s and I was playing Metallica's Black album for someone here only a few days ago, but didn't think of Lars being Torben's son. I was fortunate to see all those players you mentioned above play live, but with the exception of Arthur Ashe. It was a great era of tennis, especially for Australian players and for me, Sedgman and McGregor led the way, followed by Hoad and Rosewall. Emerson and Stolle, Newcombe and Roche..............a few very good doubles combinations there!:)

 

Cheers,

 

Keith

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Posted (edited)

"And let that be a lesson to you all. Nobody beats Vitas Gerulaitis 17 times in a row."

– after defeating Jimmy Connors at the January 1980 Masters. Gerulaitis had lost their previous 16 matches.  :D

Edited by mrbuzzardstubble

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, mrbuzzardstubble said:

"Nobody beats Vitas Gerulaitis 17 times in a row."

 

Except if your name is Bjorn Borg.;)

Edited by cheekyboy

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In the spirit of the thread, I suggest we change the title of the post again to "Tennis Discussion - GO Barty!"

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