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Antipodes;133860 wrote:
For the spelling bee whizzes here - how do you guys feel about the americanisation of spelling. Colour becomes color, carpetted becomes carpeted, etc?

 

 

 

Being more pedantic about words, than their spelling, my pet peeves include unnecessary word constructions. For example, I can be oriented towards something and it is quite unnecessary to make up new (but now common) words like 'orientated'. 'Orientated' only came about because people were ignorant of the word 'orient' (as a verb) but knew the word 'orientation', so invented 'orientate'.

Yes, this trend gets to me too (although i've learned tolerance is the best approach). Another example is 'racialistic' instead of 'racist'.

 

US spelling doesn't bug me though, I understand what they mean, which is the most important thing; plus I think some aspects of English spelling are unecessarily complicated and a little simplification is not necessarily a bad thing.

 

As an immigrant to NZ there are some phrases that I find quite odd - "dealt to" is a prime example; i've always "dealt with" someone.

 

Kiwi pronunciation is also on the whole particularly poor. Having said that, as was said earlier in the thread, "people in glass whare..." so please don't view these as objections or criticisms, merely humorous ;) observations. After all I spent most of my life in a country where traffic lights are called "robots" :D

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Given the organicness* of language, especially the English Language, constructions are a given.

 

The unnecessary word construction becomes the necessary word construction, then becomes the really old word construction that no one realises was a unnecessary word construction, then it becomes part of the language that it was constructed for. Then those that use it as vernacular complain about ones constructed by later generations (I think this one starts at an average age of 63).

 

:)

 

 

*Organicness: full of juicy organic goodness, also causing strange mutations, variances and blends. Usually attributed to the subject being alive and not "Set in Stone".

 

Contra Eisenstein who states “organicness can be defined by the fact that the work as a whole is governed by a certain law of structure and that all its parts are subordinated to this canon”

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Ok, while we're on the subject my pet hate is people using the made up word "somethink" (pronounced sumfink) instead of "something". There is no freakin word somethink! Actually, I don't know if there's a word "freakin" either but it's a good word to quickly change to once you've started the other "f-word" and you realise the kids can hear you.

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Given the organicness* of language' date=' especially the English Language, constructions are a given.

QUOTE']

 

Agreed. I am sure the 'peeves' say much more about the 'peeved' than anything else. Its been good to have a recidivist session here with other Peeved Anonymous members.

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Antipodes;133871 wrote:

 

Agreed. I am sure the 'peeves' say much more about the 'peeved' than anything else.

 

Indeed. A similar thread reared its head on the naim forum recently and deveopled quite an academic bent before disappearing up its own self important orifice. Thus far this one has been more fun :)

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King Size;133864 wrote:
Yes, this trend gets to me too (although i've learned tolerance is the best approach). Another example is 'racialistic' instead of 'racist'.

 

 

 

US spelling doesn't bug me though, I understand what they mean, which is the most important thing; plus I think some aspects of English spelling are unecessarily complicated and a little simplification is not necessarily a bad thing.

 

 

 

As an immigrant to NZ there are some phrases that I find quite odd - "dealt to" is a prime example; i've always "dealt with" someone.

 

 

 

Kiwi pronunciation is also on the whole particularly poor. Having said that, as was said earlier in the thread, "people in glass whare..." so please don't view these as objections or criticisms, merely humorous
;)
observations. After all I spent most of my life in a country where traffic lights are called "robots"
:D

 

The Americanization thing has a major accelerant called the internet to fuel it. You must be exposed to much Americanisms with your dealings with your stateside suppliers and clients.

 

Anyway, if you have ever been "dealt to" properly you probably would not like to "deal with" your said interlocutors again. You would probably run away as fast as you can, if you could, if you ever saw them again. Although this turn of phrase probably has more to do with Anglo-saxon pop cultural sadism a la Guy Ritchie cinematic tropes.

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Antipodes;133860 wrote:

 

Being more pedantic about words, than their spelling, my pet peeves include unnecessary word constructions. For example, I can be oriented towards something and it is quite unnecessary to make up new (but now common) words like 'orientated'. 'Orientated' only came about because people were ignorant of the word 'orient' (as a verb) but knew the word 'orientation', so invented 'orientate'.

 

Sorry, I cant agree. I refudiate this. To do anything else would be inartful.

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Call me a snob...... But, um, there is a dude here that uses "base" instead of "bass".

When I first saw it I was, like, get me a rifle.

 

But now I'm, like, that's soooo cute. I'd love to be like that. No it's not ignorance, it's "I just don't give a shit".

 

The english language is awesome though.

 

We had a story down here in the papers of a 16 year lad rooting a donkey in broad daylight and in plain view of houses up on a hill!

 

Gave another meaning to the saying "One man's donkey is another man's ass".

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got tinnitus;133895 wrote:

 

We had a story down here in the papers of a 16 year lad rooting a donkey in broad daylight and in plain view of houses up on a hill!

 

 

 

Gave another meaning to the saying "One man's donkey is another man's ass".

 

I had always wondered where politicians came from. Now it all makes sense.

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We had a story down here in the papers of a 16 year lad rooting a donkey in broad daylight and in plain view of houses up on a hill!

 

QUOTE]

 

there's always one each year down there who defies normally accepted behaviour and leaves the sheep alone.:D

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Ilikecrumpets;133773 wrote:

 

 

 

I heard Neil, Radar and Poindexter were considering turning themselves into a human centipede. Now I'd pay to see that !!

 

Have you seen the movie Mr crumpets? Due on DVD sometime this month. Youtube the trailer if you must......

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Yeah. It's not like it's original Verve Zappa. These usually show up for between $40 and $60, depending on condition.

 

Musicstack, like Gemm and others are full of people who seem to not know where decimal points are supposed to go. It makes people like this think they are sitting on a gold mine.

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sub;134275 wrote:
Hmm, how about an LPs "backside"?

 

 

I dont think this seller was impressed when I pointed out the the Doors 13 lp he has listed at $140 could be picked on E Bay from US$4 upwards.

A quick search found over 40 listed , most around to US$12 to $20 mark.

There's some real dreamers out there.

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Not an excuse for some of these errors but...When I left school typing was left to typists.I never learnt to use a keyboard until much later in life.My mistakes are usually keyboard errors rather than spelling mistakes.If you didnt grow up with a keyboard its not as easy as it may seem.

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