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Papa Hemi

TQWP Richard Allan

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So after a fair few hours wrestling power tools, clamping bowed 100yr old rimu and stripping lead paint of kauri door panels I have wired up the mark 1 versions of my TQWP Richard Allan CG8T. They sound better than expected - I was so impressed with them in an open baffle, but now the bass is extended and tight, while still retaining the openness and attack of the open baffle.

Here is the costing

Richard Allan CG8T $40

Demolition Rimu 290 x 15 x 6m $30

Panels from kauri door at the dump - free!

cables, connectors, screws etc - $15 approx

So all up under $100 as long as I don't price my labour, thought and love - priceless.

Anyway as can be seen there is still a lot of work to be done - shaping, sanding, tightening and polishing. all which should add to the final product.

Sonic improvements will be gained from the firm securing of the front panel, there is no damping material inside, and I think that it will stay that way.

I'm still toying with the idea of finishing the lot with dammar varnish, both the cabinets and the speaker cones - has anyone had any experience with this? Inputs would be appreciated, otherwise I'll do what I usually do and just wing it

Attached files 24530=368-P1020235.JPG 68081=1753-P1020237.JPG

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Hey Papa,

 

How long is the unfolded length of that pipe?

 

Hard to beat the responsive, lively sound of a lightwt paper cone.

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according to my calculations it should be about 1.17m, but then my calculations could be out, but it does sound good, better than before. And yes that responsiveness is certainly endearing, gets this old fella off his bum and onto his feet!

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[quote=

I'm still toying with the idea of finishing the lot with dammar varnish, both the cabinets and the speaker cones - has anyone had any experience with this? Inputs would be appreciated, otherwise I'll do what I usually do and just wing it

Nice work,as for finnishing youve only got two options really varnish/poly or timber oil.

Ive done both and they both have there good and bad points.

I can't remember how many coats of clear poly I put on my latest pair of rimu speakers but its a lot of work if you want a deep shine and what seems like eternity of sanding with the fine grits 400,800 then 1200.Thats the bad point,but when finnally you finnish of with polish and buffer you can see where all the hard work has gone.

Oils are geat for bringing out the natural grain and colours in the timber,but they tend to dull off quite quickly and dont have that brand new shinny look to them,but thats just me certianly heart rimu looks fantastic when oiled up well with dannish oil.

Have fun sanding

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yeah - theres a lot of sanding to do - my joinery skills are not the best, the final product will be more organic than square, then again an ear canal is not square is it. In this respect I feel than oil is a better option, a more organic approach, also as you say will bring out the natural grain of the kauri and rimu. Also, the fact that this is recycled timber, and as such has quite a few blemishes, oiling is more likely to be forgiving of these defects. What sort of oil would you recommend? I've got some linseed in the shed, 30-40 in the car and a variety of vegetable oils in the larder. Or do I need something purpose built? What about beeswax?

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danish oil is the best Ive found,it really brings out the best of the timber and 'sets hard' when its soaked into the wood layers.Other non timber oils just dont set off.

I found it took many coats of oil to penetrate the timber sanding the first coats in with 800 grit wet paper.

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I have had good results using several applications of teak oil applied with a cloth after fine sanding then finishing off with couple of applications of briwax, the wax completely smooths out the surface and polishes to a really nice sheen

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steven bilbee;68255 wrote:
danish oil is the best Ive found,it really brings out the best of the timber and 'sets hard' when its soaked into the wood layers.Other non timber oils just dont set off.

Guys,

I've used various oils, but am interested in the 'hardening' characteristics of this Danish oil...is it durable, ie. tabletops or floorboards, or more a furniture grade finishing? Thks.

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Owen Y;68304 wrote:
Guys,

 

I've used various oils, but am interested in the 'hardening' characteristics of this Danish oil...is it durable, ie. tabletops or floorboards, or more a furniture grade finishing? Thks.

 

A freind of mine who has worked in the marine industry building boat interiors put me on to danish oil.However he did have a small part in building "team NZs' boat that nearly sank in 2003 so maybe he dosn't know it all.

Jokes aside tho I think this oil would be great for table tops etc. I was going to do my dinning table with it but other projects used up the last of it.

It has a lovely silky finnish and buffs up nicely too.Durable for floors? I cant say for sure but the rags and brushes I used to apply the oil with went rock hard when I went to reuse them the next day so it would some guts to it.My rimu floorstanders certainly have held their shine and "hardness".

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so this danish oil, is it easy to come by? Where do you get it, it it all the same? ie is there a particular brand to look out for?

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Papa Hemi;68397 wrote:
so this danish oil, is it easy to come by? Where do you get it, it it all the same? ie is there a particular brand to look out for?

 

The "Briwax" brand of danish oil is pretty easy to come by, I have used it throughout my house on skirting boards and other joinery... the likes of bunnings and placemakers should stock it.

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