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Silent Screamer

Sound Proofing...When do you have enough?

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So like most people trying to forward plan a house build, and you plan to have enough grunt to shake walls. The question of how much is enough sound proofing comes into play?

I just come across this video on YouTube that goes a long way towards answering that question. It was always my intention to build an inner wall and roof in the home theatre room, along very similar construction methods.

My outer wall will more than likely be 8" Besser brick with vertical reo bar tied in. The inside wall I was thinking Gyprock on both sides of the frame, with insulation in the middle. The roof I would like to do a floating concrete slab depending on cost, otherwise if it was wood, then more insulation and Gyprock.

 

 

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This handy chart http://www.stcratings.com/assemblies.html demonstrates the different wall constructions, and the benefits involved. From the video in the first post it becomes obvious how he could have improved the efficiency of the wall he built. It also highlights that the green stuff he used to separate the sheets is no where near as effective as he claimed in the video.

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Sounds like your going all the way which is awesome

 

You should have a look at these

guys and there articles under the resources tab they got some great info. 

 

https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing101/

 

Avs forums are also very helpful 

 

https://www.avsforum.com/

 

Have a look at the dedicated home threads they have heaps of builds and solutions 

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-dedicated-theater-design-construction

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5 hours ago, solman said:

Sounds like your going all the way which is awesome

 

You should have a look at these

guys and there articles under the resources tab they got some great info. 

 

https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing101/

 

Avs forums are also very helpful 

 

https://www.avsforum.com/

 

Have a look at the dedicated home threads they have heaps of builds and solutions 

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/19-dedicated-theater-design-construction

It is interesting to note that concrete is better at dealing with low frequencies. Since these are the guys I am most concerned about, it might be worth looking into poured concrete or prefabbed concrete walls for the outside walls.

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Stiff walls will prevent sound from escaping, but also prevent sound from being absorbed by the walls.... meaning the room will have bigger low frequency problems.

 

At the risk of stating something which is perhaps very obvious .... it's important to not go for "maximum soundproofing" if you don't actually need it.   So it's important to consider what rooms are adjacent, etc... and what sound attenuation is acceptable/desirable.

 

With sound proofing the little things can make a very significant difference..... eg. you can have an isolated 4 foot thick wall, but if you have a gap or path around it that you've missed, then the sound transmission will still be high.

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19 hours ago, Silent Screamer said:

The inside wall I was thinking Gyprock on both sides of the frame,

So room, gyprock - frame - gyprock - room?

 

Or gyprock - frame - gyprock - gap - gyprock (or block) - then outside or another space?

 

The first is fine, the second, a real no, no

 

I've noting to add from what @solman said, study the soundproofingcompany website fastidiously. Follow Ted's instructions to the letter and you'll get a good result. Miss one little step however and it can make the whole thing moot.

 

All rooms have bass issues that need dealing with - this concept of a leaky room at the expense of soundproofing in my opinion is idiotic. You want a low sound floor (<19db ambient) so you can hear the full dynamic range of a recording. The fact that it typically keeps sound in is a bonus.

 

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3 hours ago, Peter the Greek said:

So room, gyprock - frame - gyprock - room?

 

Or gyprock - frame - gyprock - gap - gyprock (or block) - then outside or another space?

 

The first is fine, the second, a real no, no

 

I've noting to add from what @solman said, study the soundproofingcompany website fastidiously. Follow Ted's instructions to the letter and you'll get a good result. Miss one little step however and it can make the whole thing moot.

 

All rooms have bass issues that need dealing with - this concept of a leaky room at the expense of soundproofing in my opinion is idiotic. You want a low sound floor (<19db ambient) so you can hear the full dynamic range of a recording. The fact that it typically keeps sound in is a bonus.

 

For the outside wall could be one of the following... Poured concrete walls, precast concrete walls, or Besser brick with filling.

Inside that another room complete with false roof. Constructed from Gyprock either side of a metal frame with acoustic dampening in between.

The inside room would be roughly 150mm inside the outside room to create an air gap all round.

From what I have read you get better results from changing mediums over increased thickness of any particular material.

Also concrete seems to do a better job than most at absorbing the really low frequencies.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, davewantsmoore said:

Stiff walls will prevent sound from escaping, but also prevent sound from being absorbed by the walls.... meaning the room will have bigger low frequency problems.

 

At the risk of stating something which is perhaps very obvious .... it's important to not go for "maximum soundproofing" if you don't actually need it.   So it's important to consider what rooms are adjacent, etc... and what sound attenuation is acceptable/desirable.

 

With sound proofing the little things can make a very significant difference..... eg. you can have an isolated 4 foot thick wall, but if you have a gap or path around it that you've missed, then the sound transmission will still be high.

No adjoining rooms other than the garage and the workshop, with master bedroom above. I am more concerned about my nearest neighbour 30 meters away. (Directly north of the HT room)

 

House.jpg.639bbbd5ae5461da58b1b3e2779a005b.jpg

Edited by Silent Screamer

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25mm gap is all you need. 150mm is too much in my opinion....taking up valuable room space. Keep it simple, I'd either clip and channel the whole thing or do a 2x4 frame for the walls, 25mm off any other wall (and ceiling), and then either clip channel the ceiling or hang new ceiling joists.

 

 

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