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The greatest war movies ever made ??

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3 hours ago, cwt said:

Reminds me of another great movie with a similar theme Al ; Enemy at the gates ; coincidentally about another Russian sniper [and a German one] only in Stalingrad instead . Good war movies show the human condition up close like these :)

thanks for the reminder CWT, indeed enemy at the gates or the battle for Stlingrad was a great movie, one i should re watch ! indeed some parallels. on stories of famous red army snipers ! one male one female. and great way they dont miss the human condition as they say :)

 

ps guys I have started watching catch22, might post a separate thread on that ... thanks @emesbee for the heads up :)

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17 hours ago, Steam said:

 

 

Edited by Mobe1969
Duoe

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17 hours ago, Steam said:

 

 

Edited by Mobe1969
Duoe

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17 hours ago, Steam said:

Another recent film

 

Sand castle.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_Castle_(film)

 

i enjoyed it.

Where abouts is it? I've been wanting to see it.

 

BTW, I don't know if any of these have been mentioned but, some WW1 movies

 

The Lost Battalion

Beneath Hill 60

Forbidden Ground

 

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9 minutes ago, Mobe1969 said:

Where abouts is it? I've been wanting to see it.

 

BTW, I don't know if any of these have been mentioned but, some WW1 movies

 

The Lost Battalion

Beneath Hill 60

Forbidden Ground

 

not sure where steam found it but I think I caugth it on netflix a while ago :)

 

interesting on the ww1 tips :) not seen the lost battalion will look out for it :)

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The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

An

Emeric Pressberger/Michael Powell classic!

 

https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-the-life-and-death-of-colonel-blimp-1943

< One of the many miracles of "The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp" is the way the movie transforms a blustering, pigheaded caricature into one of the most loved of all movie characters. Colonel Blimp began life in a series of famous British cartoons by David Low, who represented him as an overstuffed blowhard. The movie looks past the fat, bald military man with the walrus moustache, and sees inside, to an idealist and a romantic. To know him is to love him.

Made in 1942 at the height of the Nazi threat to Great Britain, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's work is an uncommonly civilized film about war and soldiers--and rarer still, a film that defends the old against the young. Its hero is a blustering old windbag Clive Wynne-Candy, a war-horse of the Army since the Boer War, now twice retired from regular duty and relegated to leading the Home Guard.

As the film opens, the general has ordered military training exercises and announced, "War starts at midnight." A gung-ho young lieutenant decides that modern warfare doesn't play by the rules, and jumps the gun, leading his men into the General's London club and arresting him in the steam room. When Wynne-Candy bellows, "You bloody young fool--war starts at midnight!" the lieutenant observes that the Nazis do not observe gentleman's agreements, and insults the old man's belly and mustache.

Wynne-Candy is outraged. "You laugh at my big belly but you don't know how I got it! You laugh at my mustache but you don't know why I grew it!" He punches the young lieutenant, wrestles him into a swimming pool--and then, in a flashback of grace and wit, the camera pans along the surface of the water until, at the other end, young Clive Candy emerges. He is thin and without a mustache, and it is 1902.

"The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp" has four story threads. It mourns the passing of a time when professional soldiers observed a code of honor. It argues to the young that the old were young once, too, and contain within them all that the young know, and more. It marks the General's lonely romantic passage through life, in which he seeks the double of the first woman he loved. And it records a friendship between a British officer and a German officer, which spans the crucial years from 1902 to 1942.

This is an audacious enough story idea to begin with, but even more daring in 1942, when London was bombed nightly and the Nazis seemed to be winning the war. Powell at first wanted Laurence Olivier to play his title role, but the screenplay ran into fierce opposition from Winston Churchill, and the Ministry of War refused to release Olivier from military duty. Then Powell cast Roger Livesay, a young actor who had worked for him before, and as the German officer, an emigre Austrian actor named Anton Walbrook.

That led to an encounter between Churchill and Walbrook, recounted by the British film critic Derek Malcolm: "Churchill's reaction was furious. He is said to have stormed into Walbrook's dressing room when he was appearing in a West End play demanding: 'What's this film supposed to mean? I suppose you regard it as good propaganda for Britain.' Anton's reply was quite telling, he said 'No people in the world other than the English would have had the courage, in the midst of war, to tell the people such unvarnished truth'." >

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19 hours ago, mickj1 said:

Well, the Australian Army used to think "Zulu" was tops - we conscripts (8th intake, April 1967) were all marched down to the theatre for a compulsory viewing during our recruit training at Puckapunyal. I think we were supposed to get off on how to use bayonets or something... (I never used one in Vietnam though).

 

cheers

 

Mick

So how did Zulu Dawn go down Mick? A bit of a reality moment in contrast I would think.

 

Or perhaps that one wasn't shown...

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I didn't bother with the Newsweek list, typical clickbait rubbish.  But I have scanned this topic and I'm amazed that nobody has yet mentioned Dr Strangelove, or if they have I missed it.  IMHO it is by far the greatest anti war movie ever made.  Utterly hilarious and grimly serious at the same time.

 

Nor have I seen in this thread ...

The Bridge On The River Kwai

The Great Escape

Waterloo - Rod Steiger as Napoleon and Christopher Plummer as Wellington (and Orson Welles as Louis XVIII)

Letters From Iwo Jima

MASH - the movie, NOT the TV series

 

Edited by brumby

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3 hours ago, Mobe1969 said:

Where abouts is it? I've been wanting to see it.

 

BTW, I don't know if any of these have been mentioned but, some WW1 movies

 

The Lost Battalion

Beneath Hill 60

Forbidden Ground

 

Yep I saw it on Netflix. 

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17 hours ago, calypso said:

Yes the Army did love that movie because ten years after you're experience they were still showing it to us recruits at Kapooka in 1977. I wouldn't be surprised if it was still compulsory viewing.

Benders Game the book - apparently was required reading my the USMC ? I believe the book was quite different to the movie tho ? 

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If your following this thread then you may also like WW2 podcast.    One of my favourite podcasts

 

http://ww2podcast.com


My favorite episode is:

lucky 666: the impossible mission.

 

also 
 

Mark Felton Productions on youtube

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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22 minutes ago, Steam said:

Mark Felton Productions on youtube

Required viewing on obscure war facts ; like the recent vid ;  2nd Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour with flying boats :)

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1 hour ago, cwt said:

Required viewing on obscure war facts ; like the recent vid ;  2nd Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour with flying boats :)

One obscure fact I'd like to know more about is why did kamikaze pilots wear helmets ?

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3 hours ago, mrbuzzardstubble said:

One obscure fact I'd like to know more about is why did kamikaze pilots wear helmets ?

That's a good if unsettling question😁This is an educated guess but due to combat air patrols flown from US carriers ;a high altitude run and steep dive would make sense  and above 30000 feet or so the pilot would have oxygen starvation so the cowl with oxygen hose would be necessary ;just like the B17's over Germany had oxygen canisters good for 5hrs or so . Pressurised cockpits like planes today have [ and fuselages ]weren't in existence then ..

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On 19/12/2019 at 11:55 PM, mrbuzzardstubble said:

One obscure fact I'd like to know more about is why did kamikaze pilots wear helmets ?

Yes it does seem silly and makes for a good joke.

 

But it’s actually simple..  It’s bloody cold up at 30000ft.  The Irving flight jacket was not a style statement - it stopped you freezing to death.

Edited by Steam

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my dad was a pilot (not ww2 or kamikaze :D ) but I remember the "helmet" and wearing his which was just a version descended from WW2 times. a leather affair more than anything. it wasnt anything like the crash style helmets fighter pilots wear these days...

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On 14/12/2019 at 9:43 PM, betty boop said:

battle for Stlingrad was a great movie

do you mean this one? https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108211/?ref_=kw_li_tt it's more than 25 years ago when I've seen it in cinema and still remember the scene with one of the soldier (can't remember on which side of the battle) cut in half by the tank 😧 , btw. best would be German version with subs 

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I saw 1917 last night and although the script was perhaps a little predictable it still made for a bit of excitement and reflection. A little in the style of Dunkirk but a lot more gritty in many of the more 'scenic' shots. 

 

Without spoiling it, there are some similarities with Saving Private Ryan, but where that movie tries to sensationalise, 1917 is almost scarily discreet, as though the horrors of trench warfare and the surrealism of No Man's Land had become passe (adding considerably to the effectiveness).

 

I don't know if I'd describe it as one of the best war movies ever, but it does capture some elements of the horror and helplessness better than most others. 

 

Definitely worth seeing. And the attention to original detail with uniforms, equipment and landscape, etc is very good (although I'm pretty sure the Lee-Enfield 303 magazine clip held only five rounds, not eight+...)

Edited by gemini07

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53 minutes ago, kukynas said:

do you mean this one? https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108211/?ref_=kw_li_tt it's more than 25 years ago when I've seen it in cinema and still remember the scene with one of the soldier (can't remember on which side of the battle) cut in half by the tank 😧 , btw. best would be German version with subs 

hi kuky, cwt and myself were talking about Enemy at the Gates or Battle for Stalingrad which was originally a book and turned into a movie (jude law-Rachel Weisz) around 2001 so about 20 years ago. about the russian sniper Vasily Zaytsev, Great movie !!

 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0215750/

 

MV5BYWFlY2E3ODQtZWNiNi00ZGU4LTkzNWEtZTQ2

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Sure, Enemy at the gates is my second best war movie but I thought when you mentioned battle for Stalingrad you meant the one I posted 😀 , anyway, worth a look if you like WW2 movies 😉

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Anyone guess this fantastic WW2 movie...

 

 

Unknown.jpeg

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23 minutes ago, STROP said:

Anyone guess this fantastic WW2 movie...

 

 

Unknown.jpeg

Hogans heroes?

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15 minutes ago, Mobe1969 said:

12 O'Clock High?

Winner...Gen.Savage quote "We're in a war, a shooting war, we've got to fight and some of us got to die" end quote...fantastic film if anyone hasn't watched.

 

7 minutes ago, Tony ray said:

Hogans heroes?

Umm...nope.

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