Jump to content

LongtimeListener

Why it is not a good idea to buy music file downloads (and CDs/streaming music probably, too)

Recommended Posts

Thanks Grant for the well written opinion. I do very much appreciate opinions as I like a good debate as it helps to gain knowledge myself and deeper understanding.

 

An yes, I would not spend money on equipement re-producing outside 20Hz to 20Khz but it is still an interesting subject to watch.

 

I also have excellent CD recordings which pale a bad high resolution recording as the sound engineer was not willing or able to catch the sound well.

I find classical music is especially difficult as the room, the different instrument groups and the composite sound is hard to record. Composite sound means a melody/theme very often is created by mixing the instrument groups in expression, rhythm and dynamics like colours together to make the melody/theme appear. If the sound engineer in not able to catch this through various reasons, the whole piece falls apart even to a stage that it is un-listenable. A problem that even exists when you go to a live concert and the conductor looses the control over the orchestra.

As a side note, this is the reason you need a good sound system to get hooked on the sound scape of classical music.

 

I looked into other 192/24 files I have and they do not have that 0 an1 waste noise. So it must be possible to produce those resolution without them.

They have some data (music or noise) above 20kHz, but not such a huge amount like the recording in question.

 

If think, after what I have learned here, I will go only after 48/24 files now maximum. CD quality files will be checked on arrival for those dynamic range issues decribed above.

 

For the rest I just will sit down and enjoy the music. To be honest, it is just amzinng how perfect sound can be re-produced nowadays and being able to be part of it as listener is a real gift.

 

Thanks and cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LongtimeListener said:

....I looked into other 192/24 files I have and they do not have that 0 an1 waste noise. So it must be possible to produce those resolution without them.

They have some data (music or noise) above 20kHz, but not such a huge amount like the recording in question....

Again, a pleasure to read your post. Not wishing to extend an enjoyable conversation too far, but regarding the above extract, I am not sure if I misled you, and I wish to clarify.

 

Case 4 was originally a DSD recording, and that is what introduces the noise shaping.

 

Most 24/192 productions would be originally recorded in PCM digital, or recorded in analog and converted to PCM. PCM digital does not involve noise shaping. You will see no noise shaping on all music that does not involve DSD.

 

It was only the SACD logo, on the case 4 image you put in your PDF file, that alerted me to the likely presence of noise shaping. It was a surprise. I would have thought they would release it as a DSD download (which still has the noise shaping, by the way).

 

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Grant Slack said:

I would have thought they would release it as a DSD download (which still has the noise shaping, by the way)

They do, indeed.

 

Ok, my lesson learned here 😊: Beware of DSD recordings, the SACD label is an indicator, go for the 48/24 if in doubt 😉.

Thanks for clarifying, I am a much more conscious shopper in the future...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/09/2018 at 11:49 AM, Grant Slack said:

if any DSD DAC removes all energy above 20 kHz, because that is effectively turning it into CD quality with a bit more dynamic range

?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×