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georgehifi

Do I really need an amp like this? NO! But I really want an amp like this!

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2 minutes ago, Sir Sanders Zingmore said:

That looks quite good, yes ?

Less than 1dB down at 20k is gonna be inaudible (at least to my ears)

This much frequency distortion at 20khz means that there is a small amount of phase shift extending octave(s) lower.

 

.... but when we look at the output of the speaker connected to the amp (typically much worse), then it might not seem such a worry.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, davewantsmoore said:

This much frequency distortion at 20khz means that there is a small amount of phase shift extending octave(s) lower.

 

.... but when we look at the output of the speaker connected to the amp (typically much worse), then it might not seem such a worry.

 

 

I have to say that some have outstanding hearing for there age to detect -1db @ 20khz.....:thumb:😜

 

sad and for me I don’t tick that box!

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2 minutes ago, Addicted to music said:

I have to say that some have outstanding hearing for there age to detect -1db @ 20khz.....:thumb:😜

sad and for me I don’t tick that box!

I like to play a trick on people where I switch everything over 10khz on/off ... or boost it by 6dB, or whatever.  ;) 

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13 minutes ago, davewantsmoore said:

I like to play a trick on people where I switch everything over 10khz on/off ... or boost it by 6dB, or whatever.  ;) 

Gold!

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10 hours ago, davewantsmoore said:

I like to play a trick on people where I switch everything over 10khz on/off ... or boost it by 6dB, or whatever.  ;)

After you told me about all the processing that goes on in your system, I believe they're being polite when you pull this stunt on them, by not saying anything and just there to drink your wine. 

 

Cheers George

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7 hours ago, georgehifi said:

After you told me about all the processing

You may be mistaking me for someone else.... or referring to processing which I used to investigate specific things (like whether said processing was audible).   For example, is the difference between MP3 and CD audible .... are high frequencies audible?    Is group delay audible?....  Are active filters audible (vs passive?)  etc. etc.

 

 

 

Typically in my system I have:

 

Either a passive crossover, or IIR based active filters - ie. ones which are just active equivalents of typical passive filters (so no "room correction" "DRC" or other "phase manipulation).

IIR EQ applied to < 200Hz

 

Sometimes I use FIR type filters (ie. linear phase ones - that don't "occur in nature")  .... but if you read my posts, I find this quite variable (extremely prone to measurement error) and in many ways fundamentally flawed.    Although I still think it's more about "what you do with it", than blaming the tools directly.

 

I don't typically employ driver rolloffs steeper than 24dB/octave (they're just not usually very helpful)  .... so this means either 6dB or 12dB (first or second order) filters.

 

The speaker which I've sold mostly (although not for a few year now)  ... has a cap on the tweeter and a inductor on the woofer (and one parallel network on each driver).

 

 

 

 

You may have heard me talk about "more processing or EQ" .... but this is wrapped up in the speaker design process.    ie. calculating filters for baffle diffraction, or crossovers/EQ ... and a target design curve....   like all speaker designers do.

 

So, yeah <shrug>.   The above is a "lot less processing" than a LOT of people you would encounter, even on this forum....  and almost all of it, is no different to the level of manipulation that you would find in a typical passive crossover speaker.    it is just (sometimes) implemented with active circuits, which affords a lot more flexibility than a passive filter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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