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hammo1981

Big Green Egg

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If there are any Big Green Egg BBQ owners in our little community, I would like to know what you think of it. I've been a Weber Kettle owner for man years and was thinking of trying out one of the ceramic Kamado style BBQs. I mainly use my weber for indirect roasting and occasionally as a smoker. I find it difficult to do the smoker/low and slow thing on the weber. I don't direct/grill on the weber given how long it can takes to get the fuel going. Apparently the BGE is much faster? That would be a big advantage for me as I love grilling over coals.  

 

Cheers

John  

Edited by hammo1981

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3 minutes ago, hammo1981 said:

If there are any Big Green Egg BBQ owners in our little community, I would like to know what you think of it. I've been a Weber Kettle owner for man years and was thinking of trying out one of the ceramic Kamado style BBQs. I mainly use my weber for indirect roasting and occasionally as a smoker. I find it difficult to do the smoker/low and slow thing on the weber.

 

Cheers

John  

 

Hey John, Dont own a Green Egg but do have a number of years experience cooking on a Kamado joe which is another almost identical ceramic cooker.

 

Advantages over the Weber's for low and slow are:

  • Far superior at holding temps once dialled in through ANY weather (I maintained a 220f through a massive hailstorm)
  • Longer burn times, you'll easily get 10-15 hour cook times
  • More cooking area as in order to do low temps on Webers you need to do the snake method which compromised cooking space whereas ceramic cookers use deflector plates which maximises cooking space.

Disadvantages are:

  • Weight, these things are heavy an not easy to move around
  • Have to use lump charcoal which is more expensive than brickets (although lump tastes better imo) but this is offset somewhat by more efficient cooks
  • Price, these arnt cheap and you could by many Webers for the cost of one of these.

I love my Kamado  and wouldn't get rid of it for anything but in truth if you were on a budget and wanted to still use the weber for indirect/grilling then i'd recommend picking up a Pit Barrel Cooker for under $500 and be done with it. Iy cooks amazing food and I use mine all the time. It also has the advantage of having  humungous cooking ability for such a small footprint due to the hanging method. I can do 6 chooks or 8 racks of ribs.

https://www.bbqspitrotisseries.com.au/pit-barrel-cooker

 

Also check out our SNA BBQ thread.

 

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30 minutes ago, Tubularbells said:

 

Hey John, Dont own a Green Egg but do have a number of years experience cooking on a Kamado joe which is another almost identical ceramic cooker.

 

Advantages over the Weber's for low and slow are:

  • Far superior at holding temps once dialled in through ANY weather (I maintained a 220f through a massive hailstorm)
  • Longer burn times, you'll easily get 10-15 hour cook times
  • More cooking area as in order to do low temps on Webers you need to do the snake method which compromised cooking space whereas ceramic cookers use deflector plates which maximises cooking space.

Disadvantages are:

  • Weight, these things are heavy an not easy to move around
  • Have to use lump charcoal which is more expensive than brickets (although lump tastes better imo) but this is offset somewhat by more efficient cooks
  • Price, these arnt cheap and you could by many Webers for the cost of one of these.

I love my Kamado  and wouldn't get rid of it for anything but in truth if you were on a budget and wanted to still use the weber for indirect/grilling then i'd recommend picking up a Pit Barrel Cooker for under $500 and be done with it. Iy cooks amazing food and I use mine all the time. It also has the advantage of having  humungous cooking ability for such a small footprint due to the hanging method. I can do 6 chooks or 8 racks of ribs.

https://www.bbqspitrotisseries.com.au/pit-barrel-cooker

 

Also check out our SNA BBQ thread.

 

Thanks for your response. Do you do much direct grilling on your Kamado Joe?? Both can get up to crazy high temperatures and to me that seems to be essential for great steak.

DO you think that your setup is as good as it gets for low and slow BBQ?? 

 

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To be honest no I dont do much direct grilling on the KJ as it can be a laborious task getting it up to screaming hot temps just for a few steaks. It also takes another 3-4 hours after the cook to cool back down again enough to handle and whatever you do dont shut of the top and bottom vents straight after a searing session as you'll get the ceramics glowing red hot and risk cracking the firebox (don't ask me how I know 😫)

 

In terms of low and slow setup im not sure exactly what you mean as ive got 3 BBQ's all capable of low temps the Kamado, Pit Barrel and an offset smoker and they all have there place/pros & cons.

 

Seeing as you already have the Weber id be picking up a slow & sear and you'll have a killer steak cooking machine which is as good as it gets regardless of price 

 

https://abcbarbecue.com/product/slow-n-sear-2-0/

 

Then get a Pit Barrel and the few grand you save spend on some nice 7+ Wagu beef

 

The advantage of that combo is you can use the same fuel and speaking of which a nice little tip in saving fuel in a Pit Barrel is once finished remove the fire basket and place in the Weber (with all vents closed). This will snuff out the fire allowing you to use whatever's  left for your next cook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Tubularbells

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I also have a kamado. A Primo XL. I can vouch for everything Tubular Bells has said about Kamado’s. Great for low n slow, high heat direct grilling, roasting, pizza, bread making. They are all round great grills. Extremely low charcoal use for low n slow. I’ve gone 24 hours and used only about 1/3rd of the charcoal in the grill.

I reverse sear a lot - big piece of steak cooked low temp for a few hours until desired internal reached, then whilst steak is resting, open the vents to crank up the charcoal and sear quickly over high heat. Gives amazing results.

 

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Ive got a budget version, the Akorn, on sale from the big green shed for around $300.
It has a vitreous enamel inner and outer metal skin, with ceramic wool insulation, instead of solid ceramic. Its strong point for me besides price is it has a pizza stone that is also used as a heat deflector for great slow cooking. Its on wheels for easy storage. Seen the same under other names from others including Bbqs Galore.
I love it. It can hold low temps for super tender and juicy 8hr brisket, I grill with it, smoke salmon or snags, but mostly love my low and slow meat.
Using quality charcoal also makes a big difference to flavour IMO. It will get super hot if you want to grill.

http://chargrilleraustralia.com.au/products/akorn-kamado-kooker-2/

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I would agree with TubularBells comments. I own a Kamado Joe as well. The main disadvantage over a Weber is that you can not set it up for two zone cooking. The charcoal is held in a bowl shaped receptacle with the vents in the middle - this means that any coal you light will always migrate towards the center which is where the draft is. The grille is positioned high enough so that all the food is evenly exposed to heat. Great if you want low and slow. Not good if you want two zone cooking. 

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Two zone cooking is absolutely possible on the KJ. The deflector comes in two half moon ceramic disks so if you want to setup for direct on one side and indirect on the other simply place the half moon deflector under the side you want to go indirect on and you now have two cooking zones. In addition you also have two height settings which means you could grill steaks on the lower direct zone and veggies on a higher indirect one however ive never had the need to do anything like that on mine.

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1 hour ago, Tubularbells said:

Two zone cooking is absolutely possible on the KJ. The deflector comes in two half moon ceramic disks so if you want to setup for direct on one side and indirect on the other simply place the half moon deflector under the side you want to go indirect on and you now have two cooking zones. In addition you also have two height settings which means you could grill steaks on the lower direct zone and veggies on a higher indirect one however ive never had the need to do anything like that on mine.

 

Meat only eh?  I hear ya!

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Just found this....seems uncle Hector agrees with me regarding the Weber/Pit Barrel combo (watch from 17:10)

 

 

Edited by Tubularbells

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43 minutes ago, Tubularbells said:

Just found this....seems uncle Hector agrees with me regarding the Weber/Pit Barrel combo (watch from 17:10)

 

 

Cheers mate! 

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4 hours ago, Tubularbells said:

Two zone cooking is absolutely possible on the KJ. The deflector comes in two half moon ceramic disks so if you want to setup for direct on one side and indirect on the other simply place the half moon deflector under the side you want to go indirect on and you now have two cooking zones. In addition you also have two height settings which means you could grill steaks on the lower direct zone and veggies on a higher indirect one however ive never had the need to do anything like that on mine.

 

Ah, I must have the older style of heat deflector then! Mine is only one large circle. 

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I would agree with TubularBells comments. I own a Kamado Joe as well. The main disadvantage over a Weber is that you can not set it up for two zone cooking. The charcoal is held in a bowl shaped receptacle with the vents in the middle - this means that any coal you light will always migrate towards the center which is where the draft is. The grille is positioned high enough so that all the food is evenly exposed to heat. Great if you want low and slow. Not good if you want two zone cooking. 

That’s where the oval shape of the Primo XL is advantageous. Allows true two zone cooking.

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