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7 hours ago, scumbag said:

The Ultra and Micro Rendu's don't need high current. The LPS-1.2 that Uptone recently developed only delivers 1.1A. However, I guess you might be able to use a "Y" DC cable to run more than one device with a beefier PSU.

 

http://docs.sonore.us/ultrarendu/

POWER SPECIFCATIONS 
The Sonore ultraRendu utilizes an optional power supply capable of delivering 6-9 volts at 1 amp min (center +).  Do not exceed these power specifications or damage to the unit will occur. Damage from an unapproved power supplies will void the unit's warranty. 

 

The SMS-200 & Ultra in theory do not need high current. e.g. Ultra specs say max 2A.  However,  @Bilbo in his trials found that higher current gave better AQ.

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4 minutes ago, Snoopy8 said:

The SMS-200 & Ultra in theory do not need high current. e.g. Ultra specs say max 2A.  However,  @Bilbo in his trials found that higher current gave better AQ.

I meant the Ultrarendu and the microrendu don't need high current. The SOTM units definitely do.

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For anyone who has the SMS non ultra version, I bought this stuff for $400 from the classified and I could hear more detail:

 

intona USB galvanic isolation + wyred4sound recovery USB reclocker + teradak u9 linear power supply + uptone uspcb v bus isolator

 

Makes me less inclined to buy an ultra until there is a good deal. Worth adding some of it if you don’t have it (not sure what does what but the main part might be the femto clock in the recovery unit). 

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@Snoopy8, Should SMS200 and the SPS500 be turned off every night or they are meant to be on all the time?  Thanks.

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20 minutes ago, Ghost12345 said:

@Snoopy8, Should SMS200 and the SPS500 be turned off every night or they are meant to be on all the time?  Thanks.

I switch mine off.   There continues to be debate on this issue, but I agree with Clay Gieseler, who has lots more expertise and experience on electronics:

 

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Decrease in stability - 3ppm per year for 1st year then 1ppm per year after that. That is presumably 365 days, 24 hours. Not much to worry about as far as your clock chips go. 

http://www.crystek.com/crystal/spec-sheets/clock/CCHD-957.pdf

Your caps will last 10 years. Other parts may wear out faster if left on 24/7.

 

 

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Modern clock chips have good stability over a wide operating range so switching a unit on from cold shouldn't require too long for the unit to get up to a stable temperature. So there is no major issue having a unit off for a period of time. I leave my system to cook for 30 mins after a cold start. That probably has a lot to do with the biasing on my Pass Labs amp' though as it takes a while to get to the correct temperature.

Better to switch it off, and by that I mean, disconnect from the mains when not in use. We had an electrical event earlier this year that destroyed just about everything that was connected to a GPO - including stuff that was switched off! That taught me to be cautious. My whole system gets pulled out of the mains overnight and when I'm not around. If there is a storm of any kind, I generally pull out most of the power cords at home. Paranoid I know but it took us a month to get everything back to normal - no fridge for a week in the middle of Summer.

 

Mark

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13 hours ago, scumbag said:

Modern clock chips have good stability over a wide operating range so switching a unit on from cold shouldn't require too long for the unit to get up to a stable temperature. So there is no major issue having a unit off for a period of time. I leave my system to cook for 30 mins after a cold start. That probably has a lot to do with the biasing on my Pass Labs amp' though as it takes a while to get to the correct temperature.

Better to switch it off, and by that I mean, disconnect from the mains when not in use. We had an electrical event earlier this year that destroyed just about everything that was connected to a GPO - including stuff that was switched off! That taught me to be cautious. My whole system gets pulled out of the mains overnight and when I'm not around. If there is a storm of any kind, I generally pull out most of the power cords at home. Paranoid I know but it took us a month to get everything back to normal - no fridge for a week in the middle of Summer.

 

Mark

 Thanks @scumbag. Better to be safe and would you recommend completely pulling off the cable from sockets or just turning the main power switch off at the wall? I don’t use a power conditioner, so will be a pain to turn the wall switch on and off on a daily basis in the night, as it’s behind the rack..

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This is just my experience and others may disagree but the sparky told us that even if a device is switched off, if it is connected to a GPO, in certain circumstances (rare as they might be), you can still get your gear fried if it is off and still connected to a GPO.

In my case, I believe there was an electric strike up the road that caused the live or neutral and the ground to cross-over (that's the description I got so an EE or sparky can tell me if that sounds like crap!). So, in my limited understanding, that meant that the ground, (which is always connected to a device even when a GPO is in the off position) starts to conduct power and it's bye bye electronics. Our TV, PC, Modem, Fetch box, Fans, water heaters, fridges and even lights went up. I've never seen a light spitting out smoke before, quite a sight. The microwave exploded and shot out flames and the whole switch board and electrical meter had to be totally ripped out and replaced. That was hopefully a once in a lifetime experience but it's made me super cautious!

I have also read that a lightning strike (not like the one that we had, just a strike that runs through the live or neutral) will fry gear even if it is off at the wall and even if you have a power spike protector. The higher the voltage, the further a spark can jump so given the incredibly high voltage (a billion is meant to be the highest possible), a spark will simply work its way around all your protection, jump into the enclosure of your gear and find its way to ground taking your stuff with it.

 

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High Voltage injection is what it is called, and can be caused by a variety of thing but if high voltage lines fall on LV, you can get a surge before everything blows, that can bridge / jump open contacts like turned off GPO's and fry all and sundry- mind you this sort of thing can blow switch boards of walls and cause fires too everything. So  if you going on holiday and love your gear that you own- suggest you unplug it if you are worried about this......

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4 minutes ago, Eddierukiddingvarese said:

High Voltage injection is what it is called, and can be caused by a variety of thing but if high voltage lines fall on LV, you can get a surge before everything blows, that can bridge / jump open contacts like turned off GPO's and fry all and sundry- mind you this sort of thing can blow switch boards of walls and cause fires too everything. So  if you going on holiday and love your gear that you own- suggest you unplug it if you are worried about this......

what he said.

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