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Shaw

Bi-amping newbie question

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I have a pair of the original Vaf DC-X which are bi-amping capable and is rated at 100-200W RMS?

 

I just got a Pioneer VSX-930 which I'm not using the extra channels for, and am thinking of bi-amping the speakers.  The amp are rated at 170W per channel.

 

I have already bought the speaker cables, but am wondering 2 things:

 

1. Will I run a higher risk of damaging the speaker or amp by bi-amping them?  I can have the tendency to turn up the volume sometimes.

2. Will I really hear the difference?  If not, I may not bother pulling things apart.

 

Cheers

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16 minutes ago, Shaw said:

2. Will I really hear the difference?  If not, I may not bother pulling things apart.

 

What do you mean by "pulling things apart"??  I would've thought there's no issue in passively biamping - just removing a pair of jumpers in each speaker?

 

But you may not hear any difference.  (You need to tell us whether there is a difference!  🙂)

 

16 minutes ago, Shaw said:

1. Will I run a higher risk of damaging the speaker or amp by bi-amping them?  I can have the tendency to turn up the volume sometimes.

 

Cheers

 

Given your amp has (at least) 4 channels ... I can't see how using 4 of them to drive your speakers vs. only 2, can hurt the amp.

 

And no, you won't hurt the speakers, either.  You won't get any louder in a passive bi-amp situation than the normal stereo situation.  But if you remove/bypass the speakers' passive XOs and actively bi-amp - then, yes, you will be able to gain some volume from 4 channels of amplification vs. 2.

 

Andy

 

Edited by andyr

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sorry i dont know about your question but where are you getting that pio is 170w a channel?

 

only 6 0hm mention (your speakers as far as i can see are 6 0hm) is

" 150 W/ch (6 ohms, 1 kHz, tHD 1.0 %, 1 ch Driven) " not real world.

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11 hours ago, Shaw said:

I have a pair of the original Vaf DC-X which are bi-amping capable and is rated at 100-200W RMS?

 

I just got a Pioneer VSX-930 which I'm not using the extra channels for, and am thinking of bi-amping the speakers.  The amp are rated at 170W per channel.

 

I have already bought the speaker cables, but am wondering 2 things:

 

1. Will I run a higher risk of damaging the speaker or amp by bi-amping them?  I can have the tendency to turn up the volume sometimes.

Not if you setup your electronic crossover correctly. In fact, your speakers should be able to better handle high powers. 

 

11 hours ago, Shaw said:

2. Will I really hear the difference?  If not, I may not bother pulling things apart.

 

Cheers

A proper bi-amping setup (using an electronic crossover) can make HUGE differences to a system. So, yes, I guarantee you will hear a big difference (positive).

 

Unless you want to waste your time and  effort by NOT using an electronic crossover, of course. Then, you will likely hear marginal differences, if any. 

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14 hours ago, Shaw said:

I have a pair of the original Vaf DC-X which are bi-amping capable and is rated at 100-200W RMS?

 

I just got a Pioneer VSX-930 which I'm not using the extra channels for, and am thinking of bi-amping the speakers.  The amp are rated at 170W per channel.

 

I have already bought the speaker cables, but am wondering 2 things:

 

1. Will I run a higher risk of damaging the speaker or amp by bi-amping them?  I can have the tendency to turn up the volume sometimes.

2. Will I really hear the difference?  If not, I may not bother pulling things apart.

 

Cheers

Hi there, you won't run any more risk in damaging speakers with  biamp config as long as it's done right. In your case it's easy because of the amp you have - simple re assign of the outputs, remove the linking plate on the back of the speaker connect cables and you're done. 

You won't get any more volume (SPL) out of the system, but you may achieve better dynamics with slightly less distortion.

The difference it's going to make however is probably going to be minimal. But this is subjective, as with much in audio, a minimal change for some is HUGE for others. So in saying that, Bi amplification achieves a few outcomes, but the main advantage is separating the more demanding and power draining low frequencies from the mids and highs, which require proportionately much less power. In a two way speaker you are separating only the tweeter from the bas/mids. The tweeter is probably only drawing about 10 watts, so you really aren't taking much load away by doing this. IMO, having already got the cables and have spare channels on the amp - just do it! The best way to find out is to try it. Always happy to have a chat if you'd like to give us a call - (08) 8363 9996

Cheers and all the best,

Simon

 

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Go for it.

I've never heard much, if any, difference, but I've always given it a shot. Had fun playing.

It's not like you have to prove the results to anyone, and even the harshest critic isn't saying you're going to damage anything, so long as it's not breaking the bank in cabling, why not?

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