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andyr

Knife sharpening on a 'steel'?

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On 19/04/2018 at 1:57 PM, blybo said:

Years ago my boarder who was a cook (not a chef's a hole) kindly left a diamond "steel" when he moved out. Sort of lessened the anger of him not paying his share of some bills.

 

I always push away with the steel and use one of those ceramic 2 stage wheels for sharpening periodically . That said I really should send off my Globals to be professionally sharpened. I've had them for about 15 years and only had them done once... ?

 

Older version of this

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I have Global ceramic wet stones and also the ceramic steel. I also hone towards me since I was a fish filleter as a teen. Never cut myself yet. 

Anyway I now use one of these for my Global knives. Makes them like new in seconds. I can use a stone but it’s a PITA 

I have to say my favourite knives are still F.Dick knives.

 

69744303-E9DC-46E6-AFC3-DC92628B9297.jpeg

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I just bought some DMT Diamond sharpening stones this morning.

My knives are all blunt and need a bit of TLC. 

 

Hope I am able to use the stones as I have never used sharpening stones before. Will be You Tubing for instructions. 

 

91mdnEvijeL._SL1500_.jpg

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The sharper the knife, the safer the knife.

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These style of guides can be a great help to get you started with your sharpening stones. 

One other good idea is to go to your local knife store (or good kitchen store) and ask if there is a professional knife sharpening service. Get your knives sharpened properly and then use your stones to keep them in great shape. 

 

EBA1929C-137A-44F6-8661-E0B1DC2EC6C8.png

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38 minutes ago, frankn said:

These style of guides can be a great help to get you started with your sharpening stones. 

One other good idea is to go to your local knife store (or good kitchen store) and ask if there is a professional knife sharpening service. Get your knives sharpened properly and then use your stones to keep them in great shape. 

  

EBA1929C-137A-44F6-8661-E0B1DC2EC6C8.png

Thanks. Will try to source these. 

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1 hour ago, frankn said:

These style of guides can be a great help to get you started with your sharpening stones. 

One other good idea is to go to your local knife store (or good kitchen store) and ask if there is a professional knife sharpening service. Get your knives sharpened properly and then use your stones to keep them in great shape. 

 

EBA1929C-137A-44F6-8661-E0B1DC2EC6C8.png

I have these.. just be careful if you use the ceramic stones for Global as you can damage the stone. 

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10 degrees for Asian knives and 15 degrees for European 

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On 19/04/2018 at 3:21 PM, Saxon Hall said:

Here is a video about sharpening using stones.

He talks about making knives razor sharp so I will never use it to that extent because I would probably cut myself to pieces.

But for those of you confident enough with really sharp knives it may be of some use

 

Nice kit but it is $300 US.....I know....nice kit !!

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Im too lazy to learn how to use stones so use these two idiot proof solutions for all my knives.

 

The Tormek to re-edge and the Dick Rapid Knife Sharpener for touchup's

 

tormek-t8-knife-sharpener-800x416.jpg.497d24dbbe4ff0e58f22f3fef1e627ad.jpg

 

 

images.jpeg.16812067340fb3563f0125759ccd9bcd.jpeg

 

Edited by Tubularbells

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Thought I might throw my 2c in as per the original question about the safety of honing towards yourself; Perhaps the reason this originally became common practice is that in a busy kitchen/butcher environment where folks are most likely to be using a steel regularly it could be far more dangerous to OTHERS to be pushing a freshly sharpened knife, pointy bit out, away from yourself, across a steel? Just the first thought that came into my head from my 2 years experience in the BlueScope canteens as my first real job.

Likewise I strongly believe in the "A sharp knife is a safe knife" addage, with the caveat that the user has the most basic of knife skills. I can't count the number of time the old ladies in the canteens cut themselves quite severely trying to slice vegetables using blunt, serrated bread knives. The managers (again generally the old ladies who'd been there for decades) and chefs were always at odds on this issue so the chefs had a stash of proper kitchen knives, always very nicely sharpened for those of us with the basic skills to not only handle them safely but look after the edges.

 

Edited by SkipEsquire

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Not sure if anyone has seen these. HORL ones from Germany.  https://www.horl-1993.com/ I like the concept, can't quite get my head around the cost of it (about $300aud) when I pay my Japanese Knife guy $15-20 a blade every 6-12 months.

 

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On 20/08/2019 at 12:49 PM, cookster said:

Nice kit but it is $300 US.....I know....nice kit !!

If anyone knows about knives it's Bob Kramer. I've lusted after one of his knives for aeons - I think I may promise I'll spend nothing on HIFI for a year and go for it

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My kitchen knife sharpening methods come from woodworking: hand plane blades / chisels.
These ideally get sharpened, stropped and polished to something way beyond shaving arm hairs - you want to be able to shave softwood end grain - trickier than hardwood fibres, the stiffer fibres are cut more cleanly and more easily even with a duller blade. 

My favourite methods are using Japanese water stones - have about a dozen in assorted grit sizes up to 100000.
Rather an art to using these properly - the stones are soft, and must be continually re-leveled to an accurate "flat" reference. (eg sheet of glass)

Speed and quality of the result makes it worth while.  :)
Zen-like Japanese old skool fussiness - a bonus ...


 

il_570xN.1585578985_p6w5.jpg

Edited by n0bleINtP

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On 19/04/2018 at 12:37 PM, andyr said:

 

True.  My bad!

 

 

Excellent method!  However, I was told that steels were manufactured to give optimal effect when stroking towards yourself, rather than away?  Or is this just an old wive's tale?

 

Andy

 

Oh this old wife is definitely going to try this method! Great idea

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16 hours ago, n0bleINtP said:

My kitchen knife sharpening methods come from woodworking: hand plane blades / chisels.
These ideally get sharpened, stropped and polished to something way beyond shaving arm hairs - you want to be able to shave softwood end grain - trickier than hardwood fibres, the stiffer fibres are cut more cleanly and more easily even with a duller blade. 

My favourite methods are using Japanese water stones - have about a dozen in assorted grit sizes up to 100000.
Rather an art to using these properly - the stones are soft, and must be continually re-leveled to an accurate "flat" reference. (eg sheet of glass)

Speed and quality of the result makes it worth while.  :)
Zen-like Japanese old skool fussiness - a bonus ...


il_570xN.1585578985_p6w5.jpg

I never got into the water stones but now use diamond stones and then various grades of diamond paste on balsa wood hones.

 

My favourite test is to fold up the edge of a telephone book page into a long shallow upstanding triangle. Press the blade down on the edge of the triangle and see how tall the upstanding edge can get before it folds rather than cuts. My 'satisfactory' is just greater than 1 cm.

 

I've been a knife nut about as long as I've been a hi-fi nut--over 60 years!

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On 20/08/2019 at 6:11 PM, SkipEsquire said:

Thought I might throw my 2c in as per the original question about the safety of honing towards yourself; Perhaps the reason this originally became common practice is that in a busy kitchen/butcher environment where folks are most likely to be using a steel regularly it could be far more dangerous to OTHERS to be pushing a freshly sharpened knife, pointy bit out, away from yourself, across a steel? Just the first thought that came into my head from my 2 years experience in the BlueScope canteens as my first real job.

^ This.

 

Knife sharpening using a stone is a great skill - practice makes perfect. I find it very calming as well. 

Then you meet a great girl and she uses a glass chopping board AND washes your knives in the dishwasher! Hahaha. We got married this year...I do all the chopping/slicing and dicing :-)

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