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He's given up frame-building or repairs, but still painting.  And his health's been reasonable the last couple of years.  Very nice bloke.

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On 16/01/2020 at 11:17 PM, wasabijim said:

saw this bad boy in the shop yesterday. I don't usually dig Cannondale and their left field approach but this looked potent plus lights and  bumper protection integrated into the frame. at $2.7k tho... including a few pedestrian components like breaks and BB

 

https://www.cannondale.com/en-au/bikes/active/urban/bad-boy/bad-boy-1?sku=c33100m10sm

 

Did you buy it? Keen to hear how the belt drive goes.

 

My mate rides a Trek belt drive and the thing slips when you attempt to power up steep climbs, I've been tempted to launch his bike in the Yarra river on a few occasions.

 

Edited by Jaxxon

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no i was just chewing time in the shop - too many other things I could buy but shouldn't

 

i thought slippage wasn't a concern. is it too tight, or loose? did it get lubed up accidentally? 

yeah if that kept happening I'd think about doing the same

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I didnt know sna has a cycling thread! Ive stopped riding for about 2 years and just took my bikes out for a service last week and started riding the last few days...I am so unfit now

 

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2 minutes ago, MAST88 said:

I didnt know sna has a cycling thread! Ive stopped riding for about 2 years and just took my bikes out for a service last week and started riding the last few days...I am so unfit now

 

372E6691-3531-49A6-B595-487AE11B3287.jpeg

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You don’t realise how blunt your knife is until you try and cut something........

 

🚴‍♀️🚴‍♀️....🙏👍😎

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Posted (edited)

Kenevo putting smiles on mine and my 4yo daughter's faces. 2.5hr rides in the bush from home hitting some single track, she's up for bigger rides but is knackered for the entire next day as it is. 

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Edited by DrSK

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Nice one, how much it weighs ?

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, mvqq said:

Nice one, how much it weighs ?

Kenevo is a bit over 24kg but can't compare it to weights of a non ebike as it doesn't translate if you haven't ridden one, for enduro and gravity riding at least. Bike is 180mm travel 650B on 2.6 minions. 

 

The extra 10kg is between the cranks, nice and low, stable in a corner and well balanced in the air. I sold my carbon enduro two months after buying this as it wasn't being used and can go from this after 2.5 years and be comfortable on a new Enduro or Demo 8 basically right away.

 

Fitter, stronger and my riding skills have improved heaps since getting it after skills plateaued for a few years on the Enduro. Basically from getting the leg assist to double the kms or triple the metres descents for the same hours riding. And getting out on those days you'd be too stuffed after work for a normal ride and instead just running full boast and get 600m of vertical in. 

 

My biggest outing has been 60km of enduro style trails. I even enjoy a chilled XC trail and touring around on it for something to do which I'd never normally do as more gravity focused. 

Edited by DrSK

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On 18/11/2019 at 10:55 AM, Mendes said:

Hi Ged,

Have a look at one of these is you get a chance, they want $1,999 for the 2020 model, but may have runouts they want to move......sort of what I have been riding over the last 2 years.

I come from a road racing background and never want to do that crazy stuff again and this is a good compromise...

 

 

 

I did indeed end up buying a Fastroad Advanced 2 at $1600 from The Bicycle Entrepreneur and have been riding between 10 and 30 K's per day most days for a few months now. Took up so much column space enquiring after everyone's opinions I though a bit of feedback as to how it's performing for me and some comparison of the ride quality vs my 'old clunker' Cypress II. That particular ride being the first since the eighties. I'd also like to get some comparisons to my opinions from other Fastroad users, Mendes, MrGadget (FR A 1 ??)

 

First up is the looks of the bike which I love. Shallow I know but it does boost the ego riding such an exotic (to me) machine. There are plenty flashier rides out there and a dedicated cyclist would appreciate that it isn't in the very expensive league but to me it's a serious looking, sleek and handsome beast.

 

First ride out on the roads and pathways was something of a shock to me though. The try-out ride around the carpark at the shop could not have prepared me for a  ride around the pathways and roads round Goolellal, Beenyup and Joondalup lakes near me. The shock came from the overall instability of the bike. Compared to the Giant Cypress II clunker I've ridden for 10 years I suddenly felt as though I was riding on a wobble board on wheels, the flexibility and high centre of gravity seriously unnerved me. I never realised that a carbon bike would feel so fragile and damn scary, especially at high speed, I felt like the slightest twitch on my part would see me as a 40Kph pile of strawberry jam rolling along the road.

It's a feeling I still haven't completely lost though the brown underpants are no longer compulsory and a recent 52Kph plunge through a road underpass and back up into the daylight kinda showed me that it probably isn't going to shatter underneath me. The old steel, low, slow and sure Cypress feels like it's on rails when I get back on to that.

 

Disk brakes are the biz! I'm very impressed with the stopping power of the Fastroad. As a mostly path rider I do find a lot of unexpected obstacles in my way as mentioned in a few previous posts. Dogs, kiddies, absent-minded pathway strolling wanderers mean a good bell and on-a-postage stamp stopping power is essential, this bike has that.

 

During my search for a new ride I almost went for a gravel bike, Blybo's praise of them almost got me there and the biggest reasoning was that these pathways are not always in the best of conditions. They're often bordered by trees which dump all manner of crap on them and this bike does NOT like debris in it's path. Downhill twisting lanes with sticks, leaves, honky nuts and general detritus are a nightmare, at times like that I find myself wishing I'd heeded Blybo's advice. (oh for hindsight in advance) Just 'cos you're riding on bitumen doesn't mean it's all plane sailing (as it were). In opting for straight handlebars with the end risers I think I have a little more control in that regard but still a worry and have not noticed an improvement on the hand tingling front either, still kicking-in after about 10K and forcing a hand shake-out and arm stretching 10 seconds.

 

Gears, the Shimano Tiagra gearing on this machine have been the biggest disappointment. I expected smooth, fast, dependable changing but find these are clunkier, louder (exaggerated by the ringing in the frame) and more unreliable than 10 years of easy, if ponderous changing in the Cypress. After 3 weeks of ownership I found the middle three of the ten in the group-set were starting to decide between themselves which should be taking the strain 'cept they couldn't agree! Gears changing themselves every second is not conducive to pleasant riding. It had me trying to avoid those rings and getting into all sort of bother. Back to the shop for a re-set and OK for a few weeks then the same. Repeat that last paragraph - twice!!! Don't know if they're faulty or not set-up correctly or perhaps the cables stretching, slipping who knows? well the bike mechanics should, but it's still not right. Another thing is the change lever for the bottom bracket gears has 3 settings where there are only 2 gear rings, so I have to click through the three to effect the change, bloody cheap-skates, wouldn't you think they'd provide the right lever arrangement?

 

Whinge over, I just now took a break for a ride and cruised through the beautiful lakes areas of Woodvale and Kingsley around where I live, mostly pathways and apart from the above average number of pedestrians and dog walkers, as well as high count of cyclists all blowing away the Covid blues, just loved every kilometer. The gears mostly behaved just a few jumps when I forgot to avoid the troublesome ones and it was a fun ride. We've had some big storms here over the last few days and the paths are littered with junk so I had to be aware but otherwise had a blast.

 

Comfort. Here's where I thought the Cypress would have it all over the Fastroad. That venerable carriage has suspension forks, an upright sitting position a fat padded seat and suspended seat post (the bike was bought not long after back surgery) and surely must be the epitome of easy riding. Well, amazingly I find the Fastroad better in the comfort stakes. Not missing the front or rear suspension as the carbon frame, so scary for so long with its twisting and flex, must absorb the shocks every bit well, the high seat post as well as making me seem like one of those Indian pole hermits also seems to bend during the impacts to ease the pain. When I saw the razor blade excuse for a seat I grimaced at the thought of balancing my nadgers on such a torture implement but have found that it is not only more efficient for pedaling and EASIER on the dangle plums, it actually does not give me the previous numbness I experienced for ten minutes or so after the ride in my baby injector (notwithstanding the snip of 36 years ago) which I got from the Cypress.

 

Another benefit is this carbon bike is incredibly light and every pedal push is rewarded with a thrust forward so that hills are that much easier to ascend over the Cypress it's just a joke. The high C.O.G. and frame flex still has me on red alert at times and the ol' sphinkter tweeks a bit every now and then as the wheel shudders and side-swipes over a honky nut but I find it pays to force myself to loosen up and try to relax my arms and wrists as I get through the fast, tight stretches.

 

In other words, the Fastroad is more of a thrilling fairground ride that a daily commute, this thing is fun.

 

PS. If anyone knows how to hi-lite the names of Mendes, Mr Gadget and Blybo so as to alert them to this post I'd appreciate it as I'd love to hear their  input.

 

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1 hour ago, Grimmie said:

PS. If anyone knows how to hi-lite the names of Mendes, Mr Gadget and Blybo so as to alert them to this post I'd appreciate it as I'd love to hear their  input.

Great feed back @Grimmie ..... just type in their username i.e  @blybo and they will be notified....:thumb:

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@Mendes Ah Ha!! after 13-odd years you'd think I'd know that. I think I did at one stage. 🤔 Anyhow, are you finding any fault with your gears? you still enjoying the bike?

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17 minutes ago, Grimmie said:

@Mendes Ah Ha!! after 13-odd years you'd think I'd know that. I think I did at one stage. 🤔 Anyhow, are you finding any fault with your gears? you still enjoying the bike?

Gears are good, mine has Shimano 105, which is pretty good these days and all I need.

 

I used to clock up 10,000 kms a year when I was into it, so don’t have the passion like I did, lucky to do 1000 kms a year now days, but that’s ok...when I get on it it’s a great bike for what it is....🙏👍🍷

 

Glad you are enjoying yours 🙏🚴‍♀️🚴‍♀️

 

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@Grimmie

Though what I am about to tell you will be frowned apon by the cycle fashion "must-look-cool-at-all-costs" police, it has proved to be the solution to hand numbness and tingling for me.

I put the Ergon GP1 grips on which helped somewhat but as my rides got longer the problem was still there. I googled bar ends and didn't really like the idea of my hand way out there away from all controls plus I have a mirror sticking out of one side which would have required a rethink.

 

Then I found a couple of designs of bar "ends" that go inboard of  the grips. Being some what lousy I was loathe to part with another $60 bucks for another experiment that may not work so I went to Ebay and got a pair of $15 cheapies. Having small hands, I noticed that there was about half an inch of grip on the inner end that I never used so I trimmed that off and the bar "ends" fitted with just a little tweaking of the brake levers and gear shifters.

 

I can apply gentle  (but not panic "Oh ****") braking with my pinky and adjacent (what is the right name for that finger) finger and change the rear gears and so retain some control without having to move my hands. I never change the Front gears cos it is so flat where I live. I had found that resting my hands on top of the brake levers when the numbness kicked in did help but I felt I had not enough grip whereas now I have something that I am holding on to and the move back to the main grips is very quickIMG_20200510_100907.jpg.877780e63f15b3099f89ba64ae44b8af.jpgIMG_20200510_101016.jpg.a9caba9dfc1e7742f0f2b57c15573114.jpgIMG_20200510_100910.jpg.213eee002a8819037ddb3f634bb56242.jpgIMG_20200510_100927.jpg.6ec8ac83c0fc735792ffb31ab1003a84.jpgIMG_20200510_100932.jpg.17117568081de341185436fb980ffc33.jpgIMG_20200510_101241.jpg.18cd6a15ac4ea291a3d54c65ea702aa2.jpg.

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Many thanks for that @Ancientflatulence they look like a good device and luckily I'm a long way from being a purist. Must have a search for them as they do look as though they will allow me to sit a little more upright when convenient to do so. I did enquire at my bike shop as to whether brake lever extension / T-bars are available so as to allow the use of the brakes from the bar ends but the older of the guys in there says they stopped making them a long while ago when the bar ends last went out of fashion. Would be a good thing for me, I hate that lag between unexpected obstacle and changing grip to the handles for braking.

 

Hey @Mr_Gadget how's your Fastroad going?

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2 hours ago, Grimmie said:

 

Many thanks for that @Ancientflatulence they look like a good device and luckily I'm a long way from being a purist. Must have a search for them as they do look as though they will allow me to sit a little more upright when convenient to do so. I did enquire at my bike shop as to whether brake lever extension / T-bars are available so as to allow the use of the brakes from the bar ends but the older of the guys in there says they stopped making them a long while ago when the bar ends last went out of fashion. Would be a good thing for me, I hate that lag between unexpected obstacle and changing grip to the handles for braking.

 

Hey @Mr_Gadget how's your Fastroad going?

Fast road is great but it's had a very easy life up and down the driveway lol. Hope get a decent ride in the upcoming weeks. I'm more of a runner than a cyclist so I do prefer the ease of putting on runners and shorts and straight out the door.

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6 hours ago, Ancientflatulence said:

Though what I am about to tell you will be frowned apon by the cycle fashion "must-look-cool-at-all-costs" police,

No such thing fortunately. If something works for you then not a soul will frown upon you.

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I think there is a bit of it out there @Hergest ............. I work on the theory if you like it ...and it causes no harm to you or others ..... do it ..

 

But I saw a thread on an American (I think) cycling forum  ..... some innocent asked whether he should wear the straps of his bib shorts over or under his jersey ..... about 5 pages of extremely vitriolic sarcasm followed with about 5 posts actually trying to help by suggesting the pros and cons .......... I felt it was a very poor reflection on the whole forum ........... the Global Cycling Network videos have a fair amount of "this is what a real cyclist wears/does" also ........ but also a huge amount of interesting and informative stuff also so I can't completely boycott it ....... :)

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Posted (edited)
On 08/05/2020 at 2:54 PM, Grimmie said:

First up is the looks of the bike which I love. Shallow I know but it does boost the ego riding such an exotic (to me) machine. There are plenty flashier rides out there and a dedicated cyclist would appreciate that it isn't in the very expensive league but to me it's a serious looking, sleek and handsome beast.

This is actually very important. To get the most out of your riding you have to love your bike and want to get out on it. My road bike is a very capable carbon Specialized Roubaix with carbon wheels and Ultergra gears and would probably cost me somewhere near $8k to replace today. But I don't love it. I needed a new bike quickly as I wrote off my previous bike and had a trip to the Tour Down Under booked which I didn't want to miss. So I bought the best bike available at the time, rather than waiting a few months for the 1 I really wanted, and hiring or borrowing a bike for the TdU.

 

Sounds like you need to tweak the bike to suit you better, that's all. I go through each issue in turn

 

GEAR CHANGES;

Your gear cables are slowly stretching, that's probably why the gears are skipping/ghost shifting. Let's just assume for now that your limit screws have been set up correctly before delving further into what some see as a black art of bike mechanics. Unfortunately bike shop mechanics are not always very good at their job. They can also be overworked and what changes fine when on a bike stand, may not change well out on the road. Tiagra these days should change fine, but learn how to adjust your gears and riding will give much more joy.

 

 

There is a barrel adjuster on the rear derailleur where the cable enters it. Work out if your gears are not moving far enough inwards or outwards on a change. Inwards will require a half turn out of the adjuster increasing cable tension, outwards requires a half turn in. I'd only adjust half a turn at a time and go for a ride and see how it goes. A 105 rear derailleur would be a big step up for not much money. These days 105/ultegra/dura-ace all change with the same quality, they just get lighter as the price increases.

 

The 3rd or middle position on your front shifter is probably for fine tuning the front derailleur inwards ever so slightly when you are in the big ring and using the bigger cogs of the rear cassette. It stops the chain rubbing on the front derailleur. You should skip straight past that when changing from small to big rings, but find it when down changing with a small click... well that's the way my Shimano drop bar bikes have always worked.

 

TWITCHY HANDLING;

Your carbon frame will not be flexing anywhere near to the same extent as the Cypress. It is the frame geometry which which is more aggressive making turn in more direct which can feel twitchy to the uninitiated. A longer stem would help sort that out. I had a similar issue on my Roubaix which came with a 90mm stem as the trend seems to be going to shorter stems. I changed it to a 110mm after my first ride and have never had an issue since. See if your bike shop will lend you a longer stem. They usually come in 10mm increments, I'd go 20mm longer initially to see if that is where the handling issue is coming from. You can also play with tyre pressures for more comfort and more grip. I would ride your 32mm tyre at around 75-80psi, and I'm 95-100kgs, go less psi if you are lighter. You will also be able to fit cyclocross tyres if you want a tread for riding on gravel trails. Slick tread gives more outright grip on normal bike paths but yes you want to avoid as much debris as possible, especially on corners when you are leaned over. ONLY MAKE 1 CHANGE PER RIDE SO YOU NOW WHAT EACH CHANGE MAKES TO YOUR HANDLING.

 

NUMB HANDS:

The Ergon grips are great and there are many cheaper options to. I find it is an inherent issue with flat bar bikes that I also get numb or tingly hands on my mtb after half an hour or so because you are basically always in the same position and it presses on the ulna nerve. When on flat straight paths try riding with the grips in your fingers rather than your palms, this will give the nerve some relief. Drop bars give multiple hand positions which don't compress the nerve, so it's less of an issue. I know it sounds counter intuitive but try moving your saddle BACKWARDS on the seat post rails. The issue of numb hands is usually that too much of your weight is over or in front of the bottom bracket instead of behind it, which pushes your weight forward and onto your hands, rather than onto your bum.

 

Good luck.

Edited by blybo

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6 hours ago, blybo said:

This is actually very important. To get the most out of your riding you have to love your bike and want to get out on it.

Your an absolute champ @blybo and now I don't feel such a vain wee snowflake and yes I do feel far more of a serious rider than on the old Cypress. (Though I know I'm kidding myself.)

 

6 hours ago, blybo said:

 

Sounds like you need to tweak the bike to suit you better, that's all. I go through each issue in turn

 

GEAR CHANGES;

Your gear cables are slowly stretching, that's probably why the gears are skipping/ghost shifting.

Yes I think that's probably it and it's also probably my fault as I have tended to change down the gears three at a time, even when I'm not pedaling which is pretty obviously going to stretch and strain the cable 'till I start to pedal again thus allowing the gears to shift. Yet another rookie mistake.

 

6 hours ago, blybo said:

There is a barrel adjuster on the rear derailleur where the cable enters it. Work out if your gears are not moving far enough inwards or outwards on a change. Inwards will require a half turn out of the adjuster increasing cable tension, outwards requires a half turn in. I'd only adjust half a turn at a time and go for a ride and see how it goes. A 105 rear derailleur would be a big step up for not much money. These days 105/ultegra/dura-ace all change with the same quality, they just get lighter as the price increases.

Watched the video and it seems to be a reasonably simple process. I'll watch it again and give it a go as soon as.

6 hours ago, blybo said:

 

The 3rd or middle position on your front shifter is probably for fine tuning the front derailleur inwards ever so slightly when you are in the big ring and using the bigger cogs of the rear cassette. It stops the chain rubbing on the front derailleur. You should skip straight past that when changing from small to big rings, but find it when down changing with a small click... well that's the way my Shimano drop bar bikes have always worked.

Fair enough, I do tend to only use the big ring when starting a sudden incline and needing a big shift to get my feet spinning.

 

6 hours ago, blybo said:

 

TWITCHY HANDLING;

Your carbon frame will not be flexing anywhere near to the same extent as the Cypress. It is the frame geometry which which is more aggressive making turn in more direct which can feel twitchy to the uninitiated.

This. As I understand it's the shorter wheelbase and higher centre of gravity that makes for the Penny-Farthing type of feel I get but also when I deliberately rock and roll the h'bars side to side a little as i ride along the whole bike flexes and fishtails under me. I'm pretty used to it now and don't do that pointless exercise anymore - just to scare myself.

 

6 hours ago, blybo said:

A longer stem would help sort that out. I had a similar issue on my Roubaix which came with a 90mm stem as the trend seems to be going to shorter stems. I changed it to a 110mm after my first ride and have never had an issue since. See if your bike shop will lend you a longer stem. They usually come in 10mm increments, I'd go 20mm longer initially to see if that is where the handling issue is coming from. You can also play with tyre pressures for more comfort and more grip. I would ride your 32mm tyre at around 75-80psi, and I'm 95-100kgs, go less psi if you are lighter. You will also be able to fit cyclocross tyres if you want a tread for riding on gravel trails. Slick tread gives more outright grip on normal bike paths but yes you want to avoid as much debris as possible, especially on corners when you are leaned over. ONLY MAKE 1 CHANGE PER RIDE SO YOU NOW WHAT EACH CHANGE MAKES TO YOUR HANDLING.

The stem I could try, I'll have a word with Wayne at TBE in Osborne Park, he seems to be the most clue'y there. Though he did poo-poo the idea of changing tyres saying there wasn't a lot of difference to be had from that. At 85 Kg's I'm at around 70 - 75 psi so about right.

 

6 hours ago, blybo said:

 

NUMB HANDS:

The Ergon grips are great and there are many cheaper options to. I find it is an inherent issue with flat bar bikes that I also get numb or tingly hands on my mtb after half an hour or so because you are basically always in the same position and it presses on the ulna nerve. When on flat straight paths try riding with the grips in your fingers rather than your palms, this will give the nerve some relief. Drop bars give multiple hand positions which don't compress the nerve, so it's less of an issue. I know it sounds counter intuitive but try moving your saddle BACKWARDS on the seat post rails. The issue of numb hands is usually that too much of your weight is over or in front of the bottom bracket instead of behind it, which pushes your weight forward and onto your hands, rather than onto your bum.

I take it you mean by Ergon grips the mid-bar-ends that @Ancientflatulence suggested. I don't think there's room on the bars for them, pretty crowded, without moving the brake and gear levers along, still considering that one. I can envisage what you mean with the seat moving and I can see it may work.

826136562_Hbarpic.jpg.5471c75c230ce43ef9d749734485fffe.jpg

 

6 hours ago, blybo said:

 

Good luck.

Thanks again .

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3 hours ago, Grimmie said:

I take it you mean by Ergon grips the mid-bar-ends that @Ancientflatulence suggested.

No you already have ergon style "enduro" grips with bar ends. Give the seat further back thing ago along with gripping the bars in your fingers thing when numbness appears or using the bar ends in a drop bar like shake hands grip.

 

I know I can sound like it's drop bars or nothing type of fanboi on here, but my experience tells me they are much more comfortable for longer rides. You are also finding out, being a bit further lent forward is not less comfortable for the back and actually feels more efficient. I'm far more comfortable on my road bike or gravel bike than I am on my more upright mtb bike, primarily because of the lack of multiple hand positions. Drop bar riders usually only ride with their hands on the "tops", which is the flat bit between the drops, when climbing and that position allows the shoulders to go back and allow better breathing. But this position is also around 80mm further back than our normal position, so does not put weight on our hands and we are just using finger tips to steer the bike. The shake hands grip used 90% of the time when holding the shifters on a drop bar bike does not put pressure on the ulnar nerve

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Hey @Grimmie, I was just scrolling through this thread and noticed your comments re: gear troubles. I thought I might add my 2 cents. 

 

There are two things that can happen to a new bike in the box that can often get missed after the bike is assembled;

 

1) Sometimes the gear cable inners can get kinked in the box, typically right where they exit the shifter.  This tends to happen because the handlebars are detached in the box, but the cables are not (to speed reassembly). A kinked cable inner means that, even when everything is correctly reassembled, seated, and adjusted, the inners do not travel easily inside the cable outer (cable drag). This reveals itself in shifting to the smaller cogs - the cable doesn't release completely in one go, and so you temporarily find yourself between cogs. The solution is to replace the cable inner. 

 

2) Your rear derailleur attaches to your bike via a small piece of aluminium called the derailleur hanger. This is your derailleur's frame of reference. If it is straight relative to the cassette, when your shifter pulls or releases a specific amount of cable per click, the derailleur moves the jockey wheels exactly the distance between one cog and the next. But hangers often get bent in transit. If bent, it means your derailleur is not in line with the cogs of your cassette, and no amount of cable adjustment will get your shifting consistent. The solution here is to get a mechanic to tweak it with an alignment tool.

 

I can't guarantee either of these things is the culprit here, but if the issue persists they're worth investigation. 

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16 hours ago, twofires said:

Hey @Grimmie, I was just scrolling through this thread and noticed your comments re: gear troubles. I thought I might add my 2 cents. 

 

 

I much appreciate your input @twofires I seem to be at the stage where it only happens quite rarely and I have the second of my two free services (in the first year) in a few months. I'll see how it goes in the meantime and give the mechanic a heads-up as to these views when I take it in. Always a chance he'll tell me to go jump but I guess that depends on how convincing I sound. Thanks again.

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Posted (edited)

Toys for overtime.

Never keen riding the road, freaks me out

 

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Edited by Dirkgerman

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My ride(s)

 

Principia Road bike(one of the last build in Denmark before production moved to China)

GT Mountain Bike 

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