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Your old bike would be very different with lighter wheels and a bike setup. The Sirrus disc brakes would amaze you, it's the only thong you can't upgrade on your old bike

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26 minutes ago, Grimmie said:

Prof, is it worth spending money on a heavy old clunker like my current one?

 

Found this review; underwhelming to say the least.

 

In fact there’s very little about the Specialized Sirrus that excites, and this very much a work horse for the daily cruise into work rather than going out and enjoy zipping along quiet lanes at the weekend.

>>> 15 top tips for commuting to work by bike

Indeed if you frequently run late for work then there are better hybrid bikes out there. The incredibly high front end means you’re always slowed down by the wind, while the tyres also hold you back, so much so that holding any speed above 12-13mph is a real effort.

 

image: https://keyassets.timeincuk.net/inspirewp/live/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2011/01/specialized-sirrus-2016-hybrid-bike-7-e1468847767805.jpg

 

 

However, slightly more impressive is the comfort. I have to say that I wasn’t expecting much on this front due to the steel fork, but the Specialized Sirrus actually offers a relatively plush ride. You still feel potholes, but over your average rough British tarmac and things are very good. Of course a carbon fork would improve things further (indeed go further up the Sirrus range and you find carbon forks with Specialized’s Zertz vibration-dampening inserts) but this would take the price beyond the highly impressive sub-£500 price point.

 

Verdict

The Specialized Sirrus hybrid bike offers very good value at £425. Everything about it works without a fuss, with the frame equipped with mounts for mudguards and panniers, and I was particularly impressed by the Shimano Altus shifting. The only thing that lets this bike down is that it's incredibly hard to ride quickly when you're in a rush, due to the sluggish tyres and the incredibly upright position.


Read more at https://www.cyclingweekly.com/reviews/hybrid-bikes/specialized-sirrus-review#DfrFgU7bc4wqZDPP.99

Hi Ged,

Have a look at one of these is you get a chance, they want $1,999 for the 2020 model, but may have runouts they want to move......sort of what I have been riding over the last 2 years.

I come from a road racing background and never want to do that crazy stuff again and this is a good compromise...

 

 

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my short list as a fan of belt driven options 

 

WWW.BICYCLESONLINE.COM.AU

Buy Polygon Path i8 Disc - Carbon Belt Drive City Commuter Bike at Bicycles Online. Only $1199.00 including Fast Shipping Free 14 Days Test Ride

 

WWW.LEKKERBIKES.COM.AU

Shop the new Amsterdam Elite NuVinci Urban Commuter Bike. Striking design, premium components and ready to conquer your city. Shop yours today!

 

WWW.LEKKERBIKES.COM.AU

Reserve yours today with 10% reservation Discount.  Rolling straight out of the LEKKER laboratories, the newest pinnacle of urban commuting has arrived. Crafted to be the very best, the...

 

 

 

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My new ride. Well didn’t pay new price for which for me was a significant saving. 

Men's Turbo Levo FSR Expert Carbon 6Fattie/29

 

68069F53-07F8-4F87-BBB1-D9F13E10516E.jpeg.a92999e87c97bcbb1edbb7f0da374e3b.jpeg

Edited by Kensell21

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On 18/11/2019 at 6:22 PM, wasabijim said:

my short list as a fan of belt driven options 

 

Thanks for that wasa, I like the look of the first two. Never had any experience of belt drive but they look to be really good. Anyone had a ride or own one that can recommend or otherwise?

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On 18/11/2019 at 12:18 AM, Grimmie said:

That looks like a fabulous bike Sergio and just what I'm looking for but I think well beyond my budget.

 

So everyone, you all seem to be mad keen super-fit and money no object but I'm a 30 - 45 minute a day fitness rider who's been riding a Giant Cypress for the last 7 / 9 years and enjoy my rides without needing to race anyone or kill myself going flat out (I'm 65) though a dog in my path, a flight over handlebars and broken bones, punctured lung etc. a few years ago almost saw to that. Nevertheless, a new bike is in order, despite the contrary opinion of the misses. To keep her sweet I don't want to break the bank maybe $1K to 1500?? possible for a decent machine?

 

I know Trek do some beauts and I know a trip to the local bike shop is the best way to start but would like a word from the wise as what's best to look out for and / or avoid.

 

Ged

 

 

Either haggle or up your spend slightly.

 

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/au/revolt-1

 

MY20Revolt1_ColorA.jpg

 

Giant bikes offer awesome bang for buck. There is a cheaper 1 at $1500 but this one at $1899 is a 10 speed Tiagra groupset as compared to old Sora stuff. It would be easier to change out stuff over time if the upgraditis hits. It's also a do it all bike, can ride MTB trails, ride the gravel paths with confidence or on road but gravel tyres would slow you down slightly. Drop bars also allow multiple hand positions which is very welcome riding into a tough head wind.

 

Please remember just because it has drop bars does not mean you will be stretched out any more than a flat bar bike, or lower. You can also sit more upright than an equivalent flat bar bike by holding the tops of the bars

 

I ride a steel bike similar to this when on holidays as I can ride the road in the morning and then hit the trails with my daughters in the afternoon.

Edited by blybo

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1 hour ago, blybo said:

Please remember just because it has drop bars does not mean you will be stretched out any more than a flat bar bike, or lower. You can also sit more upright than an equivalent flat bar bike by holding the tops of the bars

To make this statement a little bit more convincing, I've just checked the reach and stack of the Revolt I posted, and the FastRoad @Mendes. Comparing both Giant bikes in a size Medium, reach (horizontal distance from bottom bracket to head tube) of the Revolt is 381mm compared to 388 on the FastRoad. Drop bars make the reach about 70mm longer if holding the shifters/hoods. The Revolt's stem is also 10mm shorter than the FastRoad. Stack (height of the handlebars basically) is also 9mm higher on the Revolt.

 

I'm not saying 1 is better for @Grimmie than the other, just wanted to put up some figure to dismiss the general publics thinking that a drop bar bike is automatically too aggressive or racey for them. In this instance the flat bar bike is the more aggressive bike if using the bar ends. Wider bars also reduce a riders reach. I recently put wider handlebars on my MTB and had to go from a 110mm stem back to a 90mm.

 

1106263d1479622319t-relationship-between

Edited by blybo

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3 hours ago, Grimmie said:

Thanks for that wasa, I like the look of the first two. Never had any experience of belt drive but they look to be really good. Anyone had a ride or own one that can recommend or otherwise?

 

internal hubs, as with anything different take a bit to get use to - like a few hours, then after a week or so if you ride regular it will be second nature. there's pros and cons but again nothing that isn't acceptable -  its a grip shift function vs triggers. but you can flick thru gears without needing chain movement - nice if you need to shift when stationary. the drive feels lag-free with the carbon belt. the weight re-distribution is such you need a bit more "body english" to boost off the ground - but not a problem if you plan on keeping both wheels on the ground, although clipless pedals prob help (I  ride flat pedals).  A belt and its hub is practically maintenance free and will last years offering consistent shifting - but like some you might like upgrading your drive train every other year = p  

 

 

 

 

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55 minutes ago, blybo said:

... I recently put wider handlebars on my MTB and had to go from a 110mm stem back to a 90mm.

 

 

 

90mm?!?!  that's some stem, careful 2003 doesn't call up asking for it back.... = p 

lol 

 

but back to dropbars - serious breaking more or less has to be done from the drops no? do the new disk options help?

 

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6 hours ago, blybo said:

Either haggle or up your spend slightly.

 

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/au/revolt-1

 

Giant bikes offer awesome bang for buck. There is a cheaper 1 at $1500 but this one at $1899 is a 10 speed Tiagra groupset as compared to old Sora stuff. It would be easier to change out stuff over time if the upgraditis hits. It's also a do it all bike, can ride MTB trails, ride the gravel paths with confidence or on road but gravel tyres would slow you down slightly. Drop bars also allow multiple hand positions which is very welcome riding into a tough head wind.

 

Please remember just because it has drop bars does not mean you will be stretched out any more than a flat bar bike, or lower. You can also sit more upright than an equivalent flat bar bike by holding the tops of the bars

 

I ride a steel bike similar to this when on holidays as I can ride the road in the morning and then hit the trails with my daughters in the afternoon.

Many thanks for the time and effort with your comments Blybo, it's all much appreciated. Certainly can't disagree with the Giant statement, my Cypress has lasted almost 10 years now and is still going well despite never being serviced,- crashed, cleaned bi-annually and generally used and abused. A cycling gentleman I ain't, more an oaf on two wheels but I can thank the bike for a huge lift in my general fitness and weight control, as well as enjoyment of the open air you can't find in a gym.

 

Interesting the comments re. the bars. I am a little intimidated by the drop bars, a 'racer bike' (term from my youth) is not what I anticipated buying and if I ever wore Lycra I'd die of embarrassment, also the titanium rods and bars fusing a couple of vertebrae are screaming "don't do it" but the gravel type are very interesting.

 

With the flat bars I find that after 25 or so minutes  I get a tingling in my hand due to the twisting of my wrists to horizontal and subsequent hunching of my shoulders only alleviated by a forced relaxation and holding onto the ends of the bars turning my wrists so the thumbs are top-most. I often think a 90-degree extender on the ends would be a more efficient and relaxing grip. I've seen the pro racers holding the top of their droppers that way when not riding flat out.

 

5 hours ago, blybo said:

To make this statement a little bit more convincing, I've just checked the reach and stack of the Revolt I posted, and the FastRoad @Mendes. Comparing both Giant bikes in a size Medium, reach (horizontal distance from bottom bracket to head tube) of the Revolt is 381mm compared to 388 on the FastRoad. Drop bars make the reach about 70mm longer if holding the shifters/hoods. The Revolt's stem is also 10mm shorter than the FastRoad. Stack (height of the handlebars basically) is also 9mm higher on the Revolt.

 

I'm not saying 1 is better for @Grimmie than the other, just wanted to put up some figure to dismiss the general publics thinking that a drop bar bike is automatically too aggressive or racey for them. In this instance the flat bar bike is the more aggressive bike if using the bar ends. Wider bars also reduce a riders reach. I recently put wider handlebars on my MTB and had to go from a 110mm stem back to a 90mm.

 

1106263d1479622319t-relationship-between

 

Just looking at the bars and saddle in the diag. Holy cow, Talk about head-down, arse-up. Where the hell do you stow your nadgers. (Just kidding, I know (hope) that's not a realistic riding position for mere mortals. (is it??) At the end of the day one can adjust both bars and seat pozzie to get the ideal ride.

 

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image.png.b9de868abdf36ff1a9e59f69b3c6336f.png

 

I could hold the handlebars just like that. I could nothing else he does though

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5 hours ago, wasabijim said:

 

internal hubs, as with anything different take a bit to get use to - like a few hours, then after a week or so if you ride regular it will be second nature. there's pros and cons but again nothing that isn't acceptable -  its a grip shift function vs triggers. but you can flick thru gears without needing chain movement - nice if you need to shift when stationary. the drive feels lag-free with the carbon belt. the weight re-distribution is such you need a bit more "body english" to boost off the ground - but not a problem if you plan on keeping both wheels on the ground, although clipless pedals prob help (I  ride flat pedals).  A belt and its hub is practically maintenance free and will last years offering consistent shifting - but like some you might like upgrading your drive train every other year = p  

 

 

 

 

Got to admit they do look the biz. though can imagine the purists aren't too impressed I'm about as close to purist as Shrek. Body english not needed! I tried being 'boosted off the ground' once via a wayward Border Collie, found it not to my liking as the returning to the ground broke several bones and punctured a lung. The sound of the ambulance was far better than any stereo system I've ever heard, that's for sure. Will definitely not be upgrading anything either, hopefully will get it as I want it straight-up.

Thanks for your help.

Edited by Grimmie

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13 hours ago, wasabijim said:

 

90mm?!?!  that's some stem, careful 2003 doesn't call up asking for it back.... = p 

lol 

 

but back to dropbars - serious breaking more or less has to be done from the drops no? do the new disk options help?

 

It is an older frame, Pivot Mach 5 with 26” wheels and quick release. Still prefer 26 to flexi 29’er wheels.
 

Braking is done from the hoods without issue, 1 or 2 fingers is all that’s needed with disc brakes. I only use the drops for aero benefits going downhill fast, a race to a spot on our social rides, or into headwinds. You can obviously grab a handful of brake from the drops, but not required.

Edited by blybo

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@Grimmie I also get numbness in my hands after  20-30 minutes on flat bars. Drop bars are completely normal to ride and they were basically what every adult rode until the 80’s when bmx and then mtb bikes came along. Biomechanics say it is better to have your hands holding the bars in a vertical plane than horizontal.  Stand relaxed and see if the back of your hand faces out to the side or forward. I bet it’s to the side. 
 

I can brake with 1 finger from the hoods of my drop bar bikes so that should not be a concern, ones for gravel/commuting/family rides and the other is a bike similar to your photo. My race oriented bike has the saddle 95mm higher than the bars, and the commuter bike is probably 1 cm higher in the bars and yet feels relaxed for all day cruising. When I’m not riding much I do find after about 90minutes my shoulders and neck tighten up from holding my head up, but as I begin riding more regularly it goes away. When I was racing the saddle to bars drop was almost 11cm and I could still ride 200km in that position. Now due to lack of fitness and increased weight I'm stuffed after 50kms of rolling terrain.
 

my 8 year old daughter test rode a gravel bike recently and was very nervous about the drop bars, that lasted half a lap of the car park and then she loved the idea of riding the same style of bike as her mum and dad. 
 

try looking up some Canyon Grail bikes online. If I was buying now that is what I would get as a do it all bike, but you need to know irk out sizing yourself, you can’t test ride them. This is where knowing reach and stack really helps

Edited by blybo

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8 hours ago, Grimmie said:

image.png.b9de868abdf36ff1a9e59f69b3c6336f.png

 

I could hold the handlebars just like that. I could nothing else he does though

Well he won the Tour de France and the guy behind him has won 4 now.  Chris Froome (white jersey) has hands in the tops position, which is what I often use when climbing or just riding slow. You can get to the brakes in a millisecond if required but just by automatically scanning the road, most would go back to the hoods , as Geraint Thomas and the 3rd guy (Roglic???) is doing, if they saw a need to brake arise.

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.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Hergest

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image.thumb.png.1ede80ef23cfd2fe89fd8c24e1eea005.png

 

Now they're my kind of handlebars, don't know if i'd ever use the droppers.

 

 This might just be a brick wall though.

Prices and specs

Starting prices kick off at US$2,140 / AU$3,200 / £2,000 / €2,200 and top out with the SLX 8.0 model at US$4,480 / AU$6,600 / £4,200 / €4600.

 

Oops!

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Hergest said:

I passed through 70,000 kms on the Lynskey R230 a week or two ago. It's lost its shine in the 6 odd years since new and the decals have never been very robust but it still sails along nicely and is as comfortable as ever. I've got new badges and decals in a box that I was going to tart it up with last year but I can't be arsed fitting them and would rather be riding it. Would still like a Helix.

 

 

 

1538082134_70000-2.jpeg.f8a6e3aecde9681d06e230fde2fee3c5.jpeg

 

 

Looks like over-cleaning to me. You've rubbed off the 'patina' - rookie mistake. Once a year max

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1 hour ago, Grimmie said:

This might just be a brick wall though.

Prices and specs

there is an alloy version much cheaper, AU$1749, also available in a silver colourway with black decals. I personally hate the look of those 2 level bars on the carbon version. The top and hoods of those bars would be no higher than the standard one of the alloy version, as the stem is set low into the head tube of the carbon frame, so the junction between bars and stem is lower. Too ridiculous looking even if the theory behind them is sound. I would have bought 1 of these for my wife last Christmas but the stock wasn't available till March 19.

full_grail-al-6_c1305.png?sw=1064&sh=599

 

https://www.canyon.com/en-au/road-bikes/gravel-bikes/grail/grail-al-6.0/2195.html?dwvar_2195_pv_rahmengroesse=2XL&dwvar_2195_pv_rahmenfarbe=GN%2FBK

 

Edited by blybo

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1 hour ago, Hergest said:

Echoing what Blybo says, you can get full braking force with rim brakes without being in the drops. If you can't then you've got some seriously crook and underperforming brakes. In fact gear changing with brifters is easier on the hoods than in the drops.

Rim brakes require significantly more effort than disc. I'd never go back to rim brakes after getting my 2 current drop bar disc brake bikes. @Grimmie disc brakes are a tiny bit heavier than rim brakes but offer more braking modulation, as well as power. The big thing is braking doesn't worsen much in the wet, where it does with rim brakes. You don't wear out the rim with disc brakes. You can also ride a disc brake wheel that is buckled, as the braking surface is not effected. You do want hydraulic ones if you can, cable disc brakes need more regular adjustment.

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2 hours ago, Grimmie said:

 

Edited by Hergest

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Here's a cool looker, great spec's too for 1200 bucks.

Granite 3.0

Reid Price $1,199.99

In stock

FAST DELIVERY

 
Frame Material Double butted alloy with dropped chainstays, rear thru axle, luggage mounts and enhanced clearance
Fork Custom carbon fibre with front rack mounts and disc mounts and thru axle
Crankset FSA Omega 34/50T with mega exo BB
Shifters Shimano Tiagra 20 speed STI shifters
Front Derailleur Shimano Tiagra 4700
Rear Derailleur Shimano Tiagra 4700
Brakes TRP Spyre disc brakes with 160mm rotors
Brake Levers Shimano Tiagra 4700
Hub Novatec sealed bearing disc hubs, front and rear 12mm thru axles
Wheelset-Rim Alex MD17 alloy
Tyres WTB Riddler 700 x 37C
Chain KMC X10
Freewheel/Cassette Shimano HG500 10-speed cassette (11-34t)
Bottom Bracket FSA Mega Exo BB4000
Handlebars REID compact alloy race bar
Stem 1-1/8″ alloy, oversize
Grips REID CX race tape
Saddle Reid CX Race
Seatpost REID Carbon fibre 27.2mm, 350mm length
Pedals VP 535 platform
Edited by Grimmie

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20 hours ago, blybo said:

It is an older frame, Pivot Mach 5 with 26” wheels and quick release. Still prefer 26 to flexi 29’er wheels.
 

Braking is done from the hoods without issue, 1 or 2 fingers is all that’s needed with disc brakes. I only use the drops for aero benefits going downhill fast, a race to a spot on our social rides, or into headwinds. You can obviously grab a handful of brake from the drops, but not required.

nice, they were rather exotic and drool worthy 

 

i ride my HT mtb as my daily work commuter. at times with a head wind i feel like a sail pulling me backwards. 

 

next year I'll be moving further out of the city so a more dedicated urban commuter is in order. I'm thinking a wide pair of bullhorns 

anyone have experience with these? how wide do they come? 

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQh7EopVYLvcbe5vUYFTgn

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13 hours ago, Grimmie said:

Here's a cool looker, great spec's too for 1200 bucks.

101lwn.jpg

 

Reid is about as far from quality as you can get, the "home theatre in a box" of the bike world. Big on bling for the price but inherently terrible bikes.

 

Try and pick up a 2018-2019 model from a reputable brand, it will save you money but from name you can trust.

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