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Out for a spin this morning in very windy Perth

19E37846-1BA2-46A7-A64B-C5BA415E4A9A.jpeg

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That looks like a fabulous bike Sergio and just what I'm looking for but I think well beyond my budget.

 

So everyone, you all seem to be mad keen super-fit and money no object but I'm a 30 - 45 minute a day fitness rider who's been riding a Giant Cypress for the last 7 / 9 years and enjoy my rides without needing to race anyone or kill myself going flat out (I'm 65) though a dog in my path, a flight over handlebars and broken bones, punctured lung etc. a few years ago almost saw to that. Nevertheless, a new bike is in order, despite the contrary opinion of the misses. To keep her sweet I don't want to break the bank maybe $1K to 1500?? possible for a decent machine?

 

I know Trek do some beauts and I know a trip to the local bike shop is the best way to start but would like a word from the wise as what's best to look out for and / or avoid.

 

Ged

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Grimmie said:

That looks like a fabulous bike Sergio and just what I'm looking for but I think well beyond my budget.

 

So everyone, you all seem to be mad keen super-fit and money no object but I'm a 30 - 45 minute a day fitness rider who's been riding a Giant Cypress for the last 7 / 9 years and enjoy my rides without needing to race anyone or kill myself going flat out (I'm 65) though a dog in my path, a flight over handlebars and broken bones, punctured lung etc. a few years ago almost saw to that. Nevertheless, a new bike is in order, despite the contrary opinion of the misses. To keep her sweet I don't want to break the bank maybe $1K to 1500?? possible for a decent machine?

 

I know Trek do some beauts and I know a trip to the local bike shop is the best way to start but would like a word from the wise as what's best to look out for and / or avoid.

 

Ged

 

 

Hi Ged,

You will be surprised what $1500 can get you these days.

This flat bar carbon fibre giant is all I need these days.

Maybe time for you to start test riding some new bikes.....best of luck brother.

 

Cheers

Sergio🚴‍♀️🚴‍♀️

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9 hours ago, Grimmie said:

 

I know Trek do some beauts and I know a trip to the local bike shop is the best way to start but would like a word from the wise as what's best to look out for and / or avoid.

You could do some pretty good upgrades to the bike you've got for that money

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Found this for sale second hand Specialized Sirrus Disk Hybrid Bicycle The ultimate in fitness bikes. Durable yet lightweight aluminium frame and powerful disk brakes for a fast, comfortable ride

700x32 tyres
27 speed Shimano gears
Tektro Auriga hydraulic disk brakes
Frame size is Large and bike weighs 13.5kg
Would suit someone from 170-185cm


Is this a substantial improvement over my current bike, looks pretty flash, got disk brakes. What sort of cost are these new?

bike.jpg

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Prof, is it worth spending money on a heavy old clunker like my current one?

 

Found this review; underwhelming to say the least.

 

In fact there’s very little about the Specialized Sirrus that excites, and this very much a work horse for the daily cruise into work rather than going out and enjoy zipping along quiet lanes at the weekend.

>>> 15 top tips for commuting to work by bike

Indeed if you frequently run late for work then there are better hybrid bikes out there. The incredibly high front end means you’re always slowed down by the wind, while the tyres also hold you back, so much so that holding any speed above 12-13mph is a real effort.

 

image: https://keyassets.timeincuk.net/inspirewp/live/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2011/01/specialized-sirrus-2016-hybrid-bike-7-e1468847767805.jpg

 

 

However, slightly more impressive is the comfort. I have to say that I wasn’t expecting much on this front due to the steel fork, but the Specialized Sirrus actually offers a relatively plush ride. You still feel potholes, but over your average rough British tarmac and things are very good. Of course a carbon fork would improve things further (indeed go further up the Sirrus range and you find carbon forks with Specialized’s Zertz vibration-dampening inserts) but this would take the price beyond the highly impressive sub-£500 price point.

 

Verdict

The Specialized Sirrus hybrid bike offers very good value at £425. Everything about it works without a fuss, with the frame equipped with mounts for mudguards and panniers, and I was particularly impressed by the Shimano Altus shifting. The only thing that lets this bike down is that it's incredibly hard to ride quickly when you're in a rush, due to the sluggish tyres and the incredibly upright position.


Read more at https://www.cyclingweekly.com/reviews/hybrid-bikes/specialized-sirrus-review#DfrFgU7bc4wqZDPP.99
Edited by Grimmie

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Your old bike would be very different with lighter wheels and a bike setup. The Sirrus disc brakes would amaze you, it's the only thong you can't upgrade on your old bike

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26 minutes ago, Grimmie said:

Prof, is it worth spending money on a heavy old clunker like my current one?

 

Found this review; underwhelming to say the least.

 

In fact there’s very little about the Specialized Sirrus that excites, and this very much a work horse for the daily cruise into work rather than going out and enjoy zipping along quiet lanes at the weekend.

>>> 15 top tips for commuting to work by bike

Indeed if you frequently run late for work then there are better hybrid bikes out there. The incredibly high front end means you’re always slowed down by the wind, while the tyres also hold you back, so much so that holding any speed above 12-13mph is a real effort.

 

image: https://keyassets.timeincuk.net/inspirewp/live/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2011/01/specialized-sirrus-2016-hybrid-bike-7-e1468847767805.jpg

 

 

However, slightly more impressive is the comfort. I have to say that I wasn’t expecting much on this front due to the steel fork, but the Specialized Sirrus actually offers a relatively plush ride. You still feel potholes, but over your average rough British tarmac and things are very good. Of course a carbon fork would improve things further (indeed go further up the Sirrus range and you find carbon forks with Specialized’s Zertz vibration-dampening inserts) but this would take the price beyond the highly impressive sub-£500 price point.

 

Verdict

The Specialized Sirrus hybrid bike offers very good value at £425. Everything about it works without a fuss, with the frame equipped with mounts for mudguards and panniers, and I was particularly impressed by the Shimano Altus shifting. The only thing that lets this bike down is that it's incredibly hard to ride quickly when you're in a rush, due to the sluggish tyres and the incredibly upright position.


Read more at https://www.cyclingweekly.com/reviews/hybrid-bikes/specialized-sirrus-review#DfrFgU7bc4wqZDPP.99

Hi Ged,

Have a look at one of these is you get a chance, they want $1,999 for the 2020 model, but may have runouts they want to move......sort of what I have been riding over the last 2 years.

I come from a road racing background and never want to do that crazy stuff again and this is a good compromise...

 

 

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my short list as a fan of belt driven options 

 

WWW.BICYCLESONLINE.COM.AU

Buy Polygon Path i8 Disc - Carbon Belt Drive City Commuter Bike at Bicycles Online. Only $1199.00 including Fast Shipping Free 14 Days Test Ride

 

WWW.LEKKERBIKES.COM.AU

Shop the new Amsterdam Elite NuVinci Urban Commuter Bike. Striking design, premium components and ready to conquer your city. Shop yours today!

 

WWW.LEKKERBIKES.COM.AU

Reserve yours today with 10% reservation Discount.  Rolling straight out of the LEKKER laboratories, the newest pinnacle of urban commuting has arrived. Crafted to be the very best, the...

 

 

 

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My new ride. Well didn’t pay new price for which for me was a significant saving. 

Men's Turbo Levo FSR Expert Carbon 6Fattie/29

 

68069F53-07F8-4F87-BBB1-D9F13E10516E.jpeg.a92999e87c97bcbb1edbb7f0da374e3b.jpeg

Edited by Kensell21

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On 18/11/2019 at 6:22 PM, wasabijim said:

my short list as a fan of belt driven options 

 

Thanks for that wasa, I like the look of the first two. Never had any experience of belt drive but they look to be really good. Anyone had a ride or own one that can recommend or otherwise?

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On 18/11/2019 at 12:18 AM, Grimmie said:

That looks like a fabulous bike Sergio and just what I'm looking for but I think well beyond my budget.

 

So everyone, you all seem to be mad keen super-fit and money no object but I'm a 30 - 45 minute a day fitness rider who's been riding a Giant Cypress for the last 7 / 9 years and enjoy my rides without needing to race anyone or kill myself going flat out (I'm 65) though a dog in my path, a flight over handlebars and broken bones, punctured lung etc. a few years ago almost saw to that. Nevertheless, a new bike is in order, despite the contrary opinion of the misses. To keep her sweet I don't want to break the bank maybe $1K to 1500?? possible for a decent machine?

 

I know Trek do some beauts and I know a trip to the local bike shop is the best way to start but would like a word from the wise as what's best to look out for and / or avoid.

 

Ged

 

 

Either haggle or up your spend slightly.

 

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/au/revolt-1

 

MY20Revolt1_ColorA.jpg

 

Giant bikes offer awesome bang for buck. There is a cheaper 1 at $1500 but this one at $1899 is a 10 speed Tiagra groupset as compared to old Sora stuff. It would be easier to change out stuff over time if the upgraditis hits. It's also a do it all bike, can ride MTB trails, ride the gravel paths with confidence or on road but gravel tyres would slow you down slightly. Drop bars also allow multiple hand positions which is very welcome riding into a tough head wind.

 

Please remember just because it has drop bars does not mean you will be stretched out any more than a flat bar bike, or lower. You can also sit more upright than an equivalent flat bar bike by holding the tops of the bars

 

I ride a steel bike similar to this when on holidays as I can ride the road in the morning and then hit the trails with my daughters in the afternoon.

Edited by blybo

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1 hour ago, blybo said:

Please remember just because it has drop bars does not mean you will be stretched out any more than a flat bar bike, or lower. You can also sit more upright than an equivalent flat bar bike by holding the tops of the bars

To make this statement a little bit more convincing, I've just checked the reach and stack of the Revolt I posted, and the FastRoad @Mendes. Comparing both Giant bikes in a size Medium, reach (horizontal distance from bottom bracket to head tube) of the Revolt is 381mm compared to 388 on the FastRoad. Drop bars make the reach about 70mm longer if holding the shifters/hoods. The Revolt's stem is also 10mm shorter than the FastRoad. Stack (height of the handlebars basically) is also 9mm higher on the Revolt.

 

I'm not saying 1 is better for @Grimmie than the other, just wanted to put up some figure to dismiss the general publics thinking that a drop bar bike is automatically too aggressive or racey for them. In this instance the flat bar bike is the more aggressive bike if using the bar ends. Wider bars also reduce a riders reach. I recently put wider handlebars on my MTB and had to go from a 110mm stem back to a 90mm.

 

1106263d1479622319t-relationship-between

Edited by blybo

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3 hours ago, Grimmie said:

Thanks for that wasa, I like the look of the first two. Never had any experience of belt drive but they look to be really good. Anyone had a ride or own one that can recommend or otherwise?

 

internal hubs, as with anything different take a bit to get use to - like a few hours, then after a week or so if you ride regular it will be second nature. there's pros and cons but again nothing that isn't acceptable -  its a grip shift function vs triggers. but you can flick thru gears without needing chain movement - nice if you need to shift when stationary. the drive feels lag-free with the carbon belt. the weight re-distribution is such you need a bit more "body english" to boost off the ground - but not a problem if you plan on keeping both wheels on the ground, although clipless pedals prob help (I  ride flat pedals).  A belt and its hub is practically maintenance free and will last years offering consistent shifting - but like some you might like upgrading your drive train every other year = p  

 

 

 

 

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55 minutes ago, blybo said:

... I recently put wider handlebars on my MTB and had to go from a 110mm stem back to a 90mm.

 

 

 

90mm?!?!  that's some stem, careful 2003 doesn't call up asking for it back.... = p 

lol 

 

but back to dropbars - serious breaking more or less has to be done from the drops no? do the new disk options help?

 

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6 hours ago, blybo said:

Either haggle or up your spend slightly.

 

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/au/revolt-1

 

Giant bikes offer awesome bang for buck. There is a cheaper 1 at $1500 but this one at $1899 is a 10 speed Tiagra groupset as compared to old Sora stuff. It would be easier to change out stuff over time if the upgraditis hits. It's also a do it all bike, can ride MTB trails, ride the gravel paths with confidence or on road but gravel tyres would slow you down slightly. Drop bars also allow multiple hand positions which is very welcome riding into a tough head wind.

 

Please remember just because it has drop bars does not mean you will be stretched out any more than a flat bar bike, or lower. You can also sit more upright than an equivalent flat bar bike by holding the tops of the bars

 

I ride a steel bike similar to this when on holidays as I can ride the road in the morning and then hit the trails with my daughters in the afternoon.

Many thanks for the time and effort with your comments Blybo, it's all much appreciated. Certainly can't disagree with the Giant statement, my Cypress has lasted almost 10 years now and is still going well despite never being serviced,- crashed, cleaned bi-annually and generally used and abused. A cycling gentleman I ain't, more an oaf on two wheels but I can thank the bike for a huge lift in my general fitness and weight control, as well as enjoyment of the open air you can't find in a gym.

 

Interesting the comments re. the bars. I am a little intimidated by the drop bars, a 'racer bike' (term from my youth) is not what I anticipated buying and if I ever wore Lycra I'd die of embarrassment, also the titanium rods and bars fusing a couple of vertebrae are screaming "don't do it" but the gravel type are very interesting.

 

With the flat bars I find that after 25 or so minutes  I get a tingling in my hand due to the twisting of my wrists to horizontal and subsequent hunching of my shoulders only alleviated by a forced relaxation and holding onto the ends of the bars turning my wrists so the thumbs are top-most. I often think a 90-degree extender on the ends would be a more efficient and relaxing grip. I've seen the pro racers holding the top of their droppers that way when not riding flat out.

 

5 hours ago, blybo said:

To make this statement a little bit more convincing, I've just checked the reach and stack of the Revolt I posted, and the FastRoad @Mendes. Comparing both Giant bikes in a size Medium, reach (horizontal distance from bottom bracket to head tube) of the Revolt is 381mm compared to 388 on the FastRoad. Drop bars make the reach about 70mm longer if holding the shifters/hoods. The Revolt's stem is also 10mm shorter than the FastRoad. Stack (height of the handlebars basically) is also 9mm higher on the Revolt.

 

I'm not saying 1 is better for @Grimmie than the other, just wanted to put up some figure to dismiss the general publics thinking that a drop bar bike is automatically too aggressive or racey for them. In this instance the flat bar bike is the more aggressive bike if using the bar ends. Wider bars also reduce a riders reach. I recently put wider handlebars on my MTB and had to go from a 110mm stem back to a 90mm.

 

1106263d1479622319t-relationship-between

 

Just looking at the bars and saddle in the diag. Holy cow, Talk about head-down, arse-up. Where the hell do you stow your nadgers. (Just kidding, I know (hope) that's not a realistic riding position for mere mortals. (is it??) At the end of the day one can adjust both bars and seat pozzie to get the ideal ride.

 

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