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We had our FTTN NBN connected with Aussie Broadband for a few months on the 50/20 unlimited plan. So far so good, no problems to report. Very happy with the service too. There were a few technical issues at initial connection that they were willing to help me worked through via phone and emails. Highly recommended.

 

 

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How many city dwellers are still waiting for home broadband? 

 

We had NBN connect the houses in the street to the HFC network back in early April, but after making arrangements to migrate my home phone and internet to a retailer I was advised that it's not available until after July 2019. Current ADSL gives me about 1Mbps. 

 

Fwiw, the NBN team was very efficient and were able to draw the coax through the same conduit as the twisted pair, which saved them having to dig a new trench or install additional poles along the property perimeter etc.  The only drawback was the fact that they were unable to  get under the house and run the feeder to the first connection point. It's physically possible but they refused to do it on HSE grounds. ( the risk of snakes and spiders).   

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hi @davewantsmoore

 

My folks just got their NBN connection working with Telstra today - FTTC.

 

Their 7+ year old very basic cordless home phone plugs into the Telstra 'Smart Modem' and home phone calls are working.

 

Is this using Telstra's VOIP system by default?

 

Just wondering if I swap out Telstra's 'Smart Modem' for an Asus NBN ready router , the RT-AC86U which allows for DNS config and other configurations that Telstra firmware has disabled on their Smart Modems - how will phone calls then work?

 

Or do the folks need to stay on the Telstra Smart Modem in order for phone calls to work?

 

Cheers in advance

 

Edited by Music2496

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20 minutes ago, Music2496 said:

Is this using Telstra's VOIP system by default?

It is "VoIP".

 

Exactly how it works (whether it is "Telstra VoIP system" or not) depends on which product you have - and you probably don't care.    If you get it for free/cheap, then it's the ISPs VoIP system.

 

20 minutes ago, Music2496 said:

Just wondering if I swap out Telstra's 'Smart Modem' for an Asus NBN ready router , the RT-AC86U which allows for DNS config and other configurations that Telstra firmware has disabled on their Smart Modems - how will phone calls then work?

 

Or do the folks need to stay on the Telstra Smart Modem in order for phone calls to work?

You need to ask Telstra this.

 

They will likely tell you that when supplying your own hardware you're on your own.   They should be able to tell you where to find the information you need to set it up.

 

They may just tell you straight out that you cannot provide your own hardware.   This will likely (although I cannot be totally sure) be a BS statement, to stop you using your own hardware, mucking it up, and calling them for support.

 

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, davewantsmoore said:

It is "VoIP".

 

Exactly how it works (whether it is "Telstra VoIP system" or not) depends on which product you have - and you probably don't care.    If you get it for free/cheap, then it's the ISPs VoIP system.

 

You need to ask Telstra this.

 

They will likely tell you that when supplying your own hardware you're on your own.   They should be able to tell you where to find the information you need to set it up.

 

They may just tell you straight out that you cannot provide your own hardware.   This will likely (although I cannot be totally sure) be a BS statement, to stop you using your own hardware, mucking it up, and calling them for support.

 

Noted, I'll get the folks to contact Telstra.

 

You take no responsibility for the following, but do you have a gut feel for what should work, with the Asus router? In terms of the ISP's own VoIP system?

 

I have no doubt the Asus router will be fine for internet access, so it's just the home phone situation that's a question mark.

 

Edited by Music2496

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Posted (edited)

Another option @davewantsmoore

 

If Telstra come back and say their VoIP service only works through their Telstra Smart Modem, should the following solution work?

 

Connect a small 5-port unmanaged switch to the NCD box WAN port.

 

Then connect both the Telstra Smart Modem and the Asus router to this unmanaged switch. Nothing else is on this unmanaged switch.

 

Only the VoIP phone connects to Telstra Start Modem - nothing else.

 

All other devices in the house connect through the Asus router.

 

Any problems with essentially two separate routers connected to the NCD? There'll be no 'cross talk' of devices across the routers in this setup, since only the home phone connects to the Telstra router and nothing else.

 

Edited by Music2496

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1 hour ago, Music2496 said:

but do you have a gut feel for what should work

It should work.   You will require the cooperation of your ISP.

 

20 minutes ago, Music2496 said:

Connect a small 5-port unmanaged switch to the NCD box WAN port.

 

I see what you are trying to do .... but there is a bunch of different ways you could configure the devices if they were connected that way.   Just one router is much simpler.

 

If it's impossible to have the phone on the ASUS box .... then trying it the way you suggested, you would need to reconfigure the Telstra box to turn off everything (except the VoIP), and hope that the box is happy to still provide the VoIP, even though it's not doing anything else (eg. establishing the connection to the internet).

 

 

... but I'm not sure what you can change on the Telstra router.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, davewantsmoore said:

If it's impossible to have the phone on the ASUS box .... then trying it the way you suggested, you would need to reconfigure the Telstra box to turn off everything (except the VoIP)

 

Why would anything need to be re-configured on the Telstra router, for the way I suggested? If VoIP is already working with the Telstra router (which it is) and nothing else is going to be physically connected to the Telstra router, then nothing needs to be re-configured?

 

The only config that can be done on the Telstra router is changing between router mode and bridged mode (the latter loses VoIP). Nothing else can be changed but I don't see why anything else would need to be changed? I'd just need to turn off WiFi on the Telstra router. Nothing else will ever be physically connected to it - just the phone.

 

In my suggested config, the Telstra router itself hasn't got a clue and doesn't care whether it's connected directly to the NCD WAN port or an unmanaged switch in between right? 

 

The Telstra router would literally only ever have the VoIP phone connected to it and nothing else. How does that complicate things for everything else that would be connected to the Asus router (which is connected to the NCD via 5-port unmanaged switch).

 

 

Edited by Music2496

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37 minutes ago, Music2496 said:

Why would anything need to be re-configured on the Telstra router, for the way I suggested?

That depends.   My point is that you will need to work that out.

 

Will you move the role of "establishing the connection to the internet" from the Telstra router to the Asus router?

 

If you do.... you will need to configure the Telstra router so it ....  doesn't establish the connection ... talks to the Asus to get the internet ... and hopefully still choses to bring up the VoIP session (it might think there is no reason to, as it thinks the internet isn't up).

 

If you don't ..... then potentially you will have to change nothing, and just configure the Asus so it bounces all traffic for the internet over to the Telstra router.   However this may mean that your attempts to use other DNS services are defeated.

 

37 minutes ago, Music2496 said:

The Telstra router would literally only ever have the VoIP phone connected to it and nothing else. How does that complicate things for everything else that would be connected to the Asus router (which is connected to the NCD via 5-port unmanaged switch).

As discussed above.   One of the Telstra or the Asus, will be the "gateway to the internet".   Choose your poison.     Your NCD does not establish a connection to the ISP....  whatever you plug into it does.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, davewantsmoore said:

Your NCD does not establish a connection to the ISP....  whatever you plug into it does.

This was probably the root of my misunderstanding.

 

I thought I could even plug a laptop into the NCD and have internet access with any ISP login details required (not advisable of course, always better to go through a router).

 

When I had FTTH in Hobart I was able to do this (a quick 5 min test before setting up my router).

 

Is it different with FTTC?

 

7 hours ago, davewantsmoore said:

 One of the Telstra or the Asus, will be the "gateway to the internet".   Choose your poison. 

Also probably related to my misunderstanding, due to the above.

 

While I never tried it in Hobart, if my laptop directly plugged into the NCD was working fine (internet access), I assume if I had an unmanaged switched plugged into there, then two separate laptops plugged into the unmanaged switch would work? So two 'gateways to the internet' would work?

 

Late last night I've seen many posts on the Telstra forum about people wanting to use their own routers while keeping Telstra VoIP access and Telstra aren't helpful in advice and support. 

 

Before purchasing a new router for them, I'll take my Asus router and test it out myself, next time I visit them.

Edited by Music2496

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55 minutes ago, Music2496 said:

I thought I could even plug a laptop into the NCD and have internet access with any ISP login details required (not advisable of course, always better to go through a router).

Yes, you can do that.

 

The ethernet socket on the NTD is where NBN present the service to you.     You need to establish a session with your ISP over this link .... This is done using either DHCP or PPP, and the device which does that could be a ISP or customer supplied router .... or just a computer plugged straight into the NCD (the computer speaks DHCP or PPP, instead of the router).

 

1 hour ago, Music2496 said:

I assume if I had an unmanaged switched plugged into there, then two separate laptops plugged into the unmanaged switch would work?

That can work .... you just (still) need ONE device which contacts the ISP over the link, and says "hello, give me a address on your network".    That devices then becomes the "router" where on one side it has the "ISP/internet" and the otherside it has "your network".

 

1 hour ago, Music2496 said:

So two 'gateways to the internet' would work?

No.

 

1 hour ago, Music2496 said:

Late last night I've seen many posts on the Telstra forum about people wanting to use their own routers while keeping Telstra VoIP access and Telstra aren't helpful in advice and support. 

The best that you can hope for IME, is direction to the webpage where they publish the settings you may need ... but no "help, of any sort

 

 

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This is why ISPs don't entertain these ideas.  ;)

 

This "support call" we just had, could have cost your ISP 3 months of your profits.    Who's to say you won't leave in 2 months?!

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On 14/11/2017 at 1:39 PM, Batty said:

I thought you had 18 months before having to swap to NBN once it was in your area.

It will vary a lot by area, it shouldn't be less than 18.   You'll be informed. 

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1 hour ago, Music2496 said:

While I never tried it in Hobart, if my laptop directly plugged into the NCD was working fine (internet access), I assume if I had an unmanaged switched plugged into there, then two separate laptops plugged into the unmanaged switch would work? So two 'gateways to the internet' would work?

Sorry, I skipped over the specifics of your question.

 

A switch connected to the NCD, with 2 laptops hanging off it .... 

 

The ISP needs "something" to make the connection.... this device gets an IP address from the ISP.    This device can then access the internet.     If more things on your network want to get to the internet .... then you need a device which acts as a router to translate between your network, and the IP address the ISP provided.

 

The device which makes the connection (and gets the IP) could be the same box as the router.   They could be seperate boxes.    A regular computer could perform the role of one or both devices.

 

 

If you plug a regular computer in to the NCD/NTD, what normally happens is that it negotiates the IP address with the ISP using DHCP automagically, or using PPP once you type in the username/password.    It can then access the internet.

 

It doesn't automatically act as a router for your network (eg. for the second laptop), but you can tell it to do that by enabling something like  "internet connection sharing".

 

 

I hope that's helped, not confused.

:) 

 

 

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Another vote for Aussie Broadband here.  I changed to them from iinet as their pricing is good and their cuatomer service is excellent.

 

Another thing to consider.....only if your on vdsl though, and if your in an older house,  is to get your house wiring checked.  i had 4 phone points in the house initially and was getting a max of 17mb conntection.  After getting someone in to disconnect all the phone points and run a cat5 cable to the point where i have the modem my conntection speed increased to 40mb.  Made a massive difference.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, davewantsmoore said:

 

I hope that's helped, not confused.

:) 

Ha, no lots of help actually. Greatly appreciated.

 

When I got NBN I happily ditched the ISP's router for my own router and didn't bother to have a home phone VoIP plan. I could then configure my router as I wanted (which the Telstra router doesn't allow). So this whole issue is only because the folks want to keep using their home phone (even with their $30 unlimited calls & texts mobile plans which everyone has these days).

 

Edit: @davewantsmoore I just found out their Telstra VoIP plan is pay as you go, not a plan. So I could use a Cisco SPA112 ATA for their existing handsets, with a standalone VoIP service. I need to look at standalone VoIP services that allow BYO ATA's and give a local number.

 

 

Edited by Music2496

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52 minutes ago, Music2496 said:

I need to look at standalone VoIP services that allow BYO ATA's and give a local number.

Sounds like just about every VoIP provider.   :thumb:

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, davewantsmoore said:

Sounds like just about every VoIP provider.   :thumb:

Nice. Can you recommend a few that have a good reputation, to look into? 


Telecube look good, according do Whirlpool reviews

Edited by Music2496

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1 hour ago, steffanth said:

is to get your house wiring checked

This cannot be overstated.

 

So many issues with drop outs and low speeds are to do with something on the customer side.   Some things to be aware of (your ISP should tell you all of this, but most are worse than useless).

 

 

 

 

NBN is responsible for the telephone network all the way through your property, into your house, and to the first telephone socket.    Everything after that is your business.    If you have something after the first phone socket (like more phone sockets), consider getting a licensed cabler to get rid of it.

 

Your ISP has tools provided by NBN to them, that kinda work like an "cable sonar" ... they can send 'noise' down your phone line, and listen to what comes back - which gives them a "map" of the network, including inside your house.    They should be able to tell you if you have things at your house which are causing problems.   They should be able to explain fairly conclusively why things are the way they are (eg. you have a 'bridge tap' in your wiring, or your modem is garbage, or....).   They can see all of this remotely - there is no need to send someone.

 

The expected minimum performance standards for FTTN is 12 mbps down, and 1mbps up (see note below), with less than 5 dropouts per day.    Your ISP should force you to this speed, and immediately log a fault with NBN if there are more than 5 dropouts, or lower performance - and the ISP can't see anything wrong on your side.   If they don't do this, perhaps ask them to do it (or why not).

 

When talking about logging a fault....  Your ISP may threaten you with a "charge for no fault".    What this means is that when your ISP log a fault against NBN, that NBN charge a fee to your ISP if it turns out it isn't in NBNs responsibility.    Your ISP is threatening to pass the charge on to you (if it's in YOUR responsibility).    NBN have typically not yet started charging "no fault" fees (although they can).    Basically they are just being "nice" while everyone is in transation.

 

What often happens... is that the ISP don't use the tools, and so don't really have a clue what is going on....  They log a fault with NBN ... sometimes the fault turns up on the NBN side... but frequently it turns up on the customer side.   This means the ISP is out of pocket.... should be embarrassed for not doing their job (but most customers aren't aware) .... AND needs to have the difficult conversation with the customer that the ball is in the the customer court.    ISPs would prefer to not log a fault (and risk being out of pocket) .... not employ people who can do beyond monkey troubleshooting (and risk being out of pocket) .... and not tell the customer anything (lest the customer chooses a slower and less expensive service, or decides to leave).     This is not a new issue for the NBN - it has existed forever.

 

 

Note:   Once areas have moved out of "coexistence mode", that is when all "non-NBN" services have been decommissioned..... the minimum performance standard rises to 25mbps down and 5mbps up.    There is talk about this one day rising to 50/20.

 

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1 hour ago, Music2496 said:

Nice. Can you recommend a few that have a good reputation, to look into? 

Telecube look good, according do Whirlpool reviews

 

Not really.

Haven't used VoIP as a consumer ever (been mobile phone only since this century) .... and for business, I've only ever used Telstra, or been the "provider" myself (ie. working for a company that sells VoIP - so been eating my own dogfood)

 

 

 

If it's anything less than mission critical, then I'd be shopping based on price alone.    If it IS mission critical, I would have suggested a stand alone phone service  (still VoIP, but uses a dedicated NBN service to the phone .... as opposed to being provided inside your ISPs service over the NBN) ... but that isn't available on FTTC (no technical reason, just a cost saving reason).

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On 17/06/2018 at 1:14 PM, Art Vandelay said:

The only drawback was the fact that they were unable to  get under the house and run the feeder to the first connection point. It's physically possible but they refused to do it on HSE grounds. ( the risk of snakes and spiders).

Interesting....  So no NBN for you until you remove the hazard?

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20 minutes ago, davewantsmoore said:

Interesting....  So no NBN for you until you remove the hazard?

 

I'll either have to do it myself or pay a private contractor, who will probably want me to have the under floor space inspected and removed of any nasties beforehand.  

 

NBN installed the HFC cable connection point adjacent to the mains power distribution box, and as far as they're concerned their job is now completed. 

 

I'm not in any hurry at the moment though because I was recently advised that my connection point won't be activated until Dec next year.

 

That's a price to pay for living in a blue ribbon electorate. 

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, davewantsmoore said:

If it's anything less than mission critical, then I'd be shopping based on price alone. 

Cheers for all the info.

 

Have a good plan now to ditch the Telstra box (ASUS RT-86U router + Cisco SPA112 ATA + standalone VoIP service).

 

Edited by Music2496

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