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kai41314

Balanced power supply - Tortech vs Airlink

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Hi,

 

I am looking to get a balanced power supply from Tortech or Airlink. Does anyone know which one is better? In addition, the power voltage I get from home sometimes reaches 247V which a bit too high. Can they help to drop the output voltage a bit without a special order?

 

Cheers,

Kai

Edited by kai41314

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Kai,


I believe all the Tortech transformers are pass thru in terms of voltage so a standard unit will pass 247V at the same voltage. The Airlink seem to be the same. And I can't see any step down transformers on the Airlink site - might be having a senior moment!

Can I just say, whilst 247V seems high (in comparison to the official 230V we are meant to get) it's not as high as it can go. I get 254V at my office.

The question I would put to you is, what is the voltage requirement of your gear? I'm running a Pass Labs "230V" amp and a PS Audio Direct Stream "230V" DAC with no issues at my office.

You could get a 240V to 220V stepdown transformer but I would think that might only be necessary if your gear is meant to run at 220V. I believe under voltage an be as big an issue for gear as over voltage so running your gear at 220V might even damage your gear (an electrical engineer would need to confirm this).

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The mains supply can vary +10% -6% for 230V so the limits are 253-216V.  

 

Trust me you you don't want it falling below -2%.   Otherwise equipment that have 230V AC motors or other electronic components will start to have operation failures.

 

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Ok, 10% plus. That makes sense then. So my supply is just over the specified upper limit and the OP's is within spec. 

 

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49 minutes ago, scumbag said:

Ok, 10% plus. That makes sense then. So my supply is just over the specified upper limit and the OP's is within spec. 

 

The supplier won't do anything if it's just a few volts over, but when you get to 267V and climbing,  and you reported that like I did, they will come out and measure, if it's confirmed with there meter they will set up a 28hr recorder.  If it's then consistent they then will arrange to do something.  

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22 hours ago, scumbag said:

in comparison to the official 230V we are meant to get

The change from 240V +/- 5% was a paper one only. Nothing in the network changed. All they did was move the tolerances to +10/-2% and the nominal to 230 from 240V.

Edited by A9X

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I think you're wasting your money if you expect to get some actual audible sonic benefit.

 

However, I have a number of Tortech transformers and inductors in my system and their build quality is first rate. Very good to deal with too. I work in the network so I deal with transformer measurements and quality on a daily basis.

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13 hours ago, Addicted to music said:

The mains supply can vary +10% -6% for 230V so the limits are 253-216V.  

 

Trust me you you don't want it falling below -2%.   Otherwise equipment that have 230V AC motors or other electronic components will start to have operation failures

 

5

All equipment should be designed to operate over that full range of voltages regardless of the nominal voltage written on the back.

 

 

With the future of power networks being 'disrupted' by various methods of distributed generation and electric vehicle charging loads, it should be expected that the regulation of the voltages on the network will be harder to control for the distribution networks, they will maintain compliance with the limits as they are required to do. 

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9 hours ago, hochopeper said:

All equipment should be designed to operate over that full range of voltages regardless of the nominal voltage written on the back.

 

 

With the future of power networks being 'disrupted' by various methods of distributed generation and electric vehicle charging loads, it should be expected that the regulation of the voltages on the network will be harder to control for the distribution networks, they will maintain compliance with the limits as they are required to do. 

Yes, agreed and you would assume so, but not in certain commercial environment, hence the reason most manufacturers who have seen the light of day have decided to opted for DC operated transducers such as motors, solenoid etc.  why?  When you manufacturer equipment to put onto the international stage, you cannot guarantee operation with these AC mains fluctuations.  However with a SMPSU on all your electronics component operate on DC you can regulate and guarantee that that motor will be supplied the exact voltage/current that's required to operate regardless of AC mains fluctuation.

A typical example:   2 different hole punch units, one made by GBC has a huge torque AC motor that's selected to punch 250gsm and operate directly of the AC mains.  A 2nd is a Japanese designed punch that uses a 24VDC  motor that's also punches through 250gsm.    When the mains struggles to supply 230V and only measures 209V,  the GBC failed to work but the punch unit with the 24VDC that operates of a drive supplied by a regulated SMPSU still works.  

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This is not the thread for it, but you've pointed out a common oversimplification. The 230V +10/-6% (216-253V) is measured at the electricity meter. From there the voltage drop (or rise from your own solar) within your house/business will further contribute to what an appliance sees at the wall socket.

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27 minutes ago, hochopeper said:

This is not the thread for it, but you've pointed out a common oversimplification. The 230V +10/-6% (216-253V) is measured at the electricity meter. From there the voltage drop (or rise from your own solar) within your house/business will further contribute to what an appliance sees at the wall socket.

So what's your point

 

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7 minutes ago, Addicted to music said:

So what's your point

 

209V at the socket isn't necessarily a sign that the distributor isn't meeting their obligation for providing 216-253V to the meter.

Edited by hochopeper

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On 11/14/2017 at 10:01 AM, kai41314 said:

Hi,

 

I am looking to get a balanced power supply from Tortech or Airlink. Does anyone know which one is better? In addition, the power voltage I get from home sometimes reaches 247V which a bit too high. Can they help to drop the output voltage a bit without a special order?

 

Cheers,

Kai

 

4 minutes ago, scumbag said:

Can anyone offer any advice on the OP's question?

The last question has been answered, it will require a special order. Discussing the reasoning behind the need to drop the voltage to the equipment is important for the OP to understand as it may have unintended consequences. If you do choose to get a isolation transformer or balanced supply that drops the voltage then expect to have times where your wall socket will supply low voltage (say 216V) and then that transformer will drop it even further. It is more likely that under that scenario equipment performance will be more severely impacted as linear regulator supplies in the equipment are unlikely to be operating properly at that stage.

 

I've got a tortech isolation transformer, I use it more in the electronics lab than in an audio system. My tortech transformer is not balanced power supply as mentioned by the OP. I have no experience with Airlink. As @A9X has already said, the whole balanced transformer thing isn't a great way to spend money. 

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@hochopeper - OK. I think I had a vague moment. Essentially, dropping the voltage will have more possible negatives than the higher voltage. 

Can I ask what you use your isolation for in the lab'. If is to stop ground loops? I have looked at getting one of these myself (not a balanced one, just one of these - http://www.radioparts.com.au/product/54153610/iso1000es-240v-1000va-isolation-transformer-mains-electrostatic-screen#.WgzHomViaHs

Do you think that this might offer any step-up in performance or is it a waste of time unless I have specific ground loop issues in my setup?

 

Mark

 

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On 14/11/2017 at 8:01 AM, kai41314 said:

Hi,

 

I am looking to get a balanced power supply from Tortech or Airlink. Does anyone know which one is better? In addition, the power voltage I get from home sometimes reaches 247V which a bit too high. Can they help to drop the output voltage a bit without a special order?

 

Cheers,

Kai

Not sure what balance power supply means. but i got a 2000 watt 240v to 220v tortech isolation step down transformer. 

bought it mainly because some of my gear is rated 220v while in my area could go up yo 250v. i find it improved thr sound a bit better too. but mainly i usedit because i dont my gear to overheat. 

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