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mello yello

Electric Autonomous Vehicles - Future or Flop ?

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9 hours ago, MC240 said:

 I enjoy driving and riding I like the noise a petrol engine makes I love working on my motorcycle I can also see a time when all this will be outlawed by men with hearts the size of a dried up surprise pea who's testicles are kept in their wives hand bag.

 

I can see the day you pull upto the "petrol station" the only one in town....and out the front instead of a bill board with prices... will be pictures of scorched earth and bush fires ...a bit like the kind of scary picture you have on cigarette packs... to scare people off from buying. and you will pay $100 a litre with $99 of that going to the government as taxes. 

 

of sorry autonomous cars was the title of this thread wasn't it .... dominos is testing them to deliver pizzas... sorry they are not electric and still have drivers. and just fords(tesla likely too rich for their boots)... but heck on the upside being a ford ... it will be used to being recalled :D incase something goes wrong .... 

 

 

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the whole point is that it is being shoved down our throats

one monopoly is being replaced by another monopoly

 

its one thing to be a slave to oil (out of necessity), its another thing to bend over and allow yourself to become a slave to batteries

 

there should always be a choice

 

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1 hour ago, mello yello said:

the whole point is that it is being shoved down our throats

 

Not really.

 

1 hour ago, mello yello said:

there should always be a choice

 

Who says there isn't?

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2 hours ago, mello yello said:

the whole point is that it is being shoved down our throats

one monopoly is being replaced by another monopoly

 

its one thing to be a slave to oil (out of necessity), its another thing to bend over and allow yourself to become a slave to batteries

 

there should always be a choice

 

it isn't being 'shoved down your throat'. Cars are still a little way off being fully autonomous, semi-autonomous cars will still come with a steering wheel. As someone who has driven nearly 100,000 km in a fairly basic level2/3 autonomous car and as someone who was a petrol head, I can tell you that I'm a convert: I drive the interesting parts and enjoy that immensely, I let the car do the boring bits. Active cruise control and Autopilot are fantastic in peak hour traffic, far more relaxing for me and interestingly there's also quite a bit of research that shows that it improves traffic flow for all cars.

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7 minutes ago, proftournesol said:

there's also quite a bit of research that shows that it improves traffic flow for all cars.

 

This dates to the 70's and holds true whether the vehicles are powered by electrons, dead dinos or mung beans.

 

Road throughput crises are a real thing in many cities and are starting to be so in some parts of AU... the need to get more cars through existing roads without laying down more asphalt is pretty important.

 

California PATH makes some good historical stuff freely available - http://www.path.berkeley.edu/publications/research-publications-trid-database for anyone interested. 

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1 hour ago, rmpfyf said:

 

This dates to the 70's and holds true whether the vehicles are powered by electrons, dead dinos or mung beans.

 

Road throughput crises are a real thing in many cities and are starting to be so in some parts of AU... the need to get more cars through existing roads without laying down more asphalt is pretty important.

 

California PATH makes some good historical stuff freely available - http://www.path.berkeley.edu/publications/research-publications-trid-database for anyone interested. 

Yes, it has nothing to do with EVs, it's about active cruise control.

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Another concerning reason to be considering a wider use of autonomous vehicles for everyday routine drives

Quote

It can be easy to zone out when behind the wheel, particularly when rolling down a straight or otherwise uninteresting stretch of road. While the dangers of this behaviour are obvious, a team of researchers has sought to understand just how commonplace it is, and by surveying and monitoring activity in the brains of road users, they believe they have some answers. 

A team of researchers in from the US, including officials from the Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, set up an experiment designed to quantify mind-wandering during driving. This meant hooking up volunteers to an electrophysiological monitoring system to detect changes in electrical activity in the brain. But because they couldn't slap these on actual drivers, they made do with a simulation instead.

That simulation was made to mimic the monotony of a day-to-day commute. For five consecutive days, subjects were hooked up to the monitors and then jumped into the driving simulator, completing two 20-minute drives along a straight and intentionally dull stretch of highway at a constant speed. Between those two trips, they were made to complete a written exam to replicate the mental exertion of a day's work. 

At random times throughout, the subjects would hear a buzzer and be prompted by a tablet computer asking whether their mind had been wandering. If answering yes, they were asked whether or not they were aware that their mind had been wandering. 

"We found that during simulated driving, people's minds wander a lot – some upwards of 70 percent of the time," says Carryl Baldwin, of George Mason University, who was involved in the study.

The team says that subjects were more likely to indulge in mind-wandering during the second trip, and that they were only aware of their mind-wandering 65 percent of the time. And by observing the electrical activity in the brain, they saw distinct changes in electrophysiological brain patterns when mind-wandering did occur. 

"Mind wandering may be an essential part of human existence and unavoidable," says Baldwin. "It may be a way to restore the mind after a long day at the office. What we are not sure about yet, is how dangerous it is during driving. We need additional research to figure this out. In terms of improving safety in the future, one option could be autonomous transport systems, like self-driving cars, that allow people's minds to wander when it is safe to do so, but re-engage when they need to pay attention."

The team's research was published in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

Source: Frontiers via EurekAlert

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Autonomy is still some time away

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One facet of Tesla’s Autopilot system — now known as AP 2 — that few people understand or pay much attention to is that every Tesla manufactured since October 2016 has been gathering data from every mile it is driven and sharing that data with the Tesla Mother Ship in Silicon Valley. Operating in “shadow mode,” the system does not directly affect how an individual car operates but it does provide the raw data engineers need to drive progress toward a future in which self driving cars are the norm.

 

Now, members of the Tesla Motors Club forum indicate that the latest updates to the Autopilot software have expanded the amount of data being collected. After one Model S owner gained access to the data stream being downloaded from his car, Tesla released a statement saying it has begun capturing short video clips from cameras on Model S and Model X vehicles. “We are working hard to improve autonomous safety features and make self-driving a reality for you as soon as possible,” the company now says in its Data Sharing Policy.

The expanded data collection comes at a time when there are rumblings of discontent from within Tesla’s Autopilot division. The Wall Street Journal reported in August that some engineers believe the company is writing checks it can’t cash when it comes to claims about the autonomous driving capability of its cars.

Although the company is careful to say that full autonomy depends on extensive validation of the software and approval from state and federal regulators, it still refers to Autopilot as a “full self-driving” system. That language has led to the departure of several top people who were in charge of Autopilot development for Tesla.

The most recent person to find the exit door was Chris Lattner, a highly respected engineer at Apple who quit after only two months on the job, apparently after butting heads personally with Elon Musk. CNN reported recently that there are still many members of the team who are uncomfortable with the sweeping claims Musk is making for his Autopilot system and the aggressive timetable he has established for its final rollout.

The enhanced data collection suggests the project is still going forward with all possible speed and faster than some within the company are comfortable with. It will be interesting to see whether that transcontinental self driving escape will in fact take place before the end of the year.

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On 9/3/2017 at 10:28 PM, proftournesol said:

What would you call someone who parked their car across all the  functioning petrol bowsers, blocked your access and then went shopping for an hour? Same inconsiderate behaviour

funny you should say that

happened to me today

beached car dead set halfway between the bowsers, blocking the whole exit route, facing the wrong way, and inside doing some shopping at the 7 Eleven

 

Spoiler

everybody was fine when i got back, nobody called me anything -

 

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My question has always been...  what is the protocol of an EAV ?

 

Five kids run out in front of the car at speed. Collision can be avoided but only by killing the driver via a light pole job.

 

Who survives ?

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1 hour ago, mello yello said:

funny you should say that

happened to me today

beached car dead set halfway between the bowsers, blocking the whole exit route, facing the wrong way, and inside doing some shopping at the 7 Eleven

 

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everybody was fine when i got back, nobody called me anything -

 

I wonder what would have happened if you are gone for an hour? Same thing happened to me at a Supercharger, only 1 out of 2 was working, someone was parked at the one charger doing a full charge for an hour, I had to wait an hour to get the 10 minute charge that I needed. He hadn't left his number on the windscreen nor come and checked during that hour, he didn't have to but it would have been polite. It's just about being polite and considerate no matter which car you drive

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1 hour ago, (ツ) said:

My question has always been...  what is the protocol of an EAV ?

 

Five kids run out in front of the car at speed. Collision can be avoided but only by killing the driver via a light pole job.

 

Who survives ?

That's one of the issues that need to be resolved before we see autonomous cars on the road

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i dont find that bimbo in the feature story polite by calling people "gasholes" without knowing why they are parked there :)

 

chicken/egg anecdotes dont exonerate her "uncoolness" either,

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, proftournesol said:

It's just about being polite and considerate no matter which car you drive

 

Unfortunately if you have to rely on this it may often be a long wait to charge up. :(

 

One of the issues about blocked charging bays is that many bays are not owned by the charging provider and there are no on-site staff to manage the occupancy (unlike petrol stations). 

 

Greg

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33 minutes ago, GregWormald said:

 

Unfortunately if you have to rely on this it may often be a long wait to charge up. :(

 

One of the issues about blocked charging bays is that many bays are not owned by the charging provider and there are no on-site staff to manage the occupancy (unlike petrol stations). 

 

Greg

Sure, it does rely on politeness but even at the petrol station if nobody comes to claim their car there's little the staff can do.

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