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mello yello

Electric Autonomous Vehicles - Future or Flop ?

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On 14/01/2017 at 8:31 PM, CAVX said:

I am going to say future because at some point they will work.  Just not anytime soon.

not in their current level of technology though

i think chargeable electric (the ones you need to stop every couple of hours or so to charge) will be skipped right over for something more efficient, some large capacity energy source, hydrogen, whatever, but they really cant be sustainable in non nuclear powered countries like Australia

Hyundai for example arent even going to bother and will wait for the next technology, whatever it may be

didnt the oil companies buy out all the patents for clean efficient self powered technologies in the 70's and 80's ? or was that all conspiracy fodder ?

 

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On 16/01/2017 at 9:46 PM, mello yello said:

not in their current level of technology though

i think chargeable electric (the ones you need to stop every couple of hours or so to charge) will be skipped right over for something more efficient, some large capacity energy source, hydrogen, whatever, but they really cant be sustainable in non nuclear powered countries like Australia

Hyundai for example arent even going to bother and will wait for the next technology, whatever it may be

didnt the oil companies buy out all the patents for clean efficient self powered technologies in the 70's and 80's ? or was that all conspiracy fodder ?

 

I don't we will ever see a hydrogen powered fuel cell anytime whilst there is still fossil fuel (oil and coal) in the ground.  

Many things could be done better.  Just look at the joke that is solar panels.   They take up so much room, yet with less than 25 percent efficiency.  Then the battery packs that require you to have literally a wall of them if you wanted to go off grid.  They last 10 years apparently.  But your investment would be equal to 15 or 20 years worth of power consumption.  

Maybe considered a conspiracy theory, but yeah.  Didn't that guy Wondal (or what ever his name was) from WA not only have his patent suddenly bought by some mob in the middle east, but I am sure he had an unfortunate accident a few years later when he spoke to the news papers.  

The design I am referring to was was a 36 piston circular configuration that fired 3 pistons at one time, needed 100% fuel until the engine was brought up to temp, then could run off just 40% fuel and 60% water.  He made 3 sized engines 0.5ltr, 1.0ltr and 1.5ltr and where the 1.5ltr unit outputted the KW as a 5ltr V8 of that time.  His engines could be manufactured on any metal lathe that you would find in a high school.   

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thats one alarming one

Saudi are already looking to invest their petrodollars for battery powered ones, so breaking away from Middle East dependence wont come about with a quick engine swap anytime soon either

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On 19/01/2017 at 2:04 PM, mello yello said:

thats one alarming one

Saudi are already looking to invest their petrodollars for battery powered ones, so breaking away from Middle East dependence wont come about with a quick engine swap anytime soon either

Is it true that parts of the middle east are actually running out of oil?  

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8 hours ago, CAVX said:

Is it true that parts of the middle east are actually running out of oil?  

Seems unlikely. 

The largest remaining reserves are in Saudi Arabia, which has around 260 billion barrels, followed by Iraq, which has an estimated 110 billion. The United Arab Emirates and and Kuwait each have has 100 billion , with the fifth largest reserve in Iran, which has around 90 billion barrels.

In comparison, the North Sea has around 5 billion barrels remaining. The US has around 40 billion barrels of reserves.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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Billions?  WOW!  So we will continue to pollute this planet for some time then.  

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15 minutes ago, CAVX said:

Billions?  WOW!  So we will continue to pollute this planet for some time then.  

50 years or so it would seem. I think a big problem in the future is that we use petrochemicals to make a lot of stuff (i.e. not the power derived but the physical substance)\. Stuff you can't make without petro chemicals. We'll presumably transition at some point to alternative energies but have lost most of our reserves for other stuff.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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2 hours ago, pgdownload said:

Seems unlikely. 

The largest remaining reserves are in Saudi Arabia, which has around 260 billion barrels, followed by Iraq, which has an estimated 110 billion. The United Arab Emirates and and Kuwait each have has 100 billion , with the fifth largest reserve in Iran, which has around 90 billion barrels.

In comparison, the North Sea has around 5 billion barrels remaining. The US has around 40 billion barrels of reserves.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

So that's why they're at war over there.

Thought it was 50 years of oil left 20 years ago?

I wonder though, with all the oil dried up, what happens to the planet? I would have thought the oil is essential to the health of the planet? Surely we where never meant to take this out?

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I don't believe any of it..its a con, and the general public get played..

I feel sorry for all those mother's who loose sons to wars over this stuff.

The quicker we get off oil the better everyone will be.

mixo

 

p.s wasnt it a few years ago we at peak oil and that we would never go under 100 bucks a barrel...all bullshit...

 

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3 hours ago, oztheatre said:

So that's why they're at war over there.

Thought it was 50 years of oil left 20 years ago?

I wonder though, with all the oil dried up, what happens to the planet? I would have thought the oil is essential to the health of the planet? Surely we where never meant to take this out?

I don't believe there's some overarching reason why oil should stay in the ground. AFAIK oil provides no real benefit to the planet (its really rather toxic when it gets above ground). The planet is ours to explore and use IMO. Unfortunately we're out of balance in many areas but that will be corrected in due course. Be thankful we've lived in such an amazing time and in such an amazing county :)

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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On 24/01/2017 at 7:58 AM, pgdownload said:

50 years or so it would seem. I think a big problem in the future is that we use petrochemicals to make a lot of stuff (i.e. not the power derived but the physical substance)\. Stuff you can't make without petro chemicals. We'll presumably transition at some point to alternative energies but have lost most of our reserves for other stuff.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

Your right about this.  There are so many things we take for granted, like plastics, that start as petrochemicals. 

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22 hours ago, oztheatre said:

So that's why they're at war over there.

Thought it was 50 years of oil left 20 years ago?

I wonder though, with all the oil dried up, what happens to the planet? I would have thought the oil is essential to the health of the planet? Surely we where never meant to take this out?

I guess the big question here is, where did it come from in the first place?  What makes oil? Coal is essentially decomposing organic matter compressed in the ground over millions of years.  If oil is formed in a similar way, why does it remain in a liquid form?

About 20 years ago, I worked this guy from the US who said that he owned land in the states and it had oil seeping out the ground.  He would have put in a pump had the tax rate not been so high on top of the cost of the pump itself.  He said the land value would increase faster than any profits he could make pumping oil, so he decided to come and live/work in Australia for while whist his investment incubated.

If it was meant to stay in the ground, why would it seep out?       

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12 minutes ago, CAVX said:

I guess the big question here is, where did it come from in the first place?  What makes oil? Coal is essentially decomposing organic matter compressed in the ground over millions of years.  If oil is formed in a similar way, why does it remain in a liquid form?

About 20 years ago, I worked this guy from the US who said that he owned land in the states and it had oil seeping out the ground.  He would have put in a pump had the tax rate not been so high on top of the cost of the pump itself.  He said the land value would increase faster than any profits he could make pumping oil, so he decided to come and live/work in Australia for while whist his investment incubated.

If it was meant to stay in the ground, why would it seep out?       

I dont know. I guess most things in the ground make their way up in some instances, lava, gas and oils.

Surely we're creating some pretty big voids in the ground where oil once was? trillions of barrels taken so far and billions more to come out?

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21 minutes ago, CAVX said:

I guess the big question here is, where did it come from in the first place?  What makes oil? Coal is essentially decomposing organic matter compressed in the ground over millions of years.  If oil is formed in a similar way, why does it remain in a liquid form?

If it was meant to stay in the ground, why would it seep out?       

Its not 'meant' to do anything - it does what the physics dictate. 

  • Its nature of creation (vegetable matter being 'cooked' by pressure under layers of sediment that form over millions of years means it usually forms deep underground.  
  • But oil is actually lighter than water so if it is formed under permeable rock then it will actually rise to the surface one day. 
  • Usually though the rock is impermeable and we have to drill down to get to it.

As for why coal is not oil and visa versa, it appears while the process is similar (dead vegetation under millions of years of sediment) Oil (and gas) forms when it happens in the sea and coal forms when it happens on land (Which would explain why no one digs for coal in the sea and why most big oil and gas reserves use oil rigs out to sea)

I did not know that :)

Regards

Peter Gillespie

Edited by pgdownload

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6 minutes ago, oztheatre said:

Surely we're creating some pretty big voids in the ground where oil once was? trillions of barrels taken so far and billions more to come out?

I doubt we've even come close to shifting the 10th decimal point of material under the earth around (i.e. 0.00000001%). I believe with oil, they first just let the natural underground pressure push the oil up. After a while that dissipates so they pump water down to continue the process (effectively replacing the oil with water). With coal we largely just scoop it of the surface (making those huge holes we're all familiar with).

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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