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MLXXX

NBN download speeds in practice: fast enough to access UHD?

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2 hours ago, GaryCook said:

I'm on Telstra Foxtel HFC cable and get 130 mbps on a good day/time and it never gets below 40 mbps.

I'm a bit surprised at the number. The HFC speed is usually limited by the ISP according to what plan you're on. I think 100Mbps is  the top tier at the moment. Perhaps Telstra just flick all the switches to max on the upper plan. 

FWIW without knowing your home data consumption, I've found 100Mbps of little practical value for the extra $240 a year it costs. Few households would encounter many bottle necks at 30Mbps so long as it was a solid 30Mbps.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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23 minutes ago, GaryCook said:

BTW, that's no accident, the availability of HPC cable was one of the considerations in choosing the location. 

Cheers Gary    

Well obviously that is where I went wrong ....

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Copper will never be faster than fibre.

Fibre will get faster - as a data 'conduit' it's pretty much future-proof & only limited by the equipment utilising it at each end.

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1 hour ago, Ralfi said:

Fibre will get faster

It sure will;

A team of engineers has just used a new type of laser-based transmission technology to smash data transfer records, achieving an incredibly speedy 57 gigabits per second at room temperature.

To put it in perspective, 57 Gbps is enough to download a whole Blu-ray in just a few seconds. That's the fastest ever data transmission speed over a new type of laser called a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), which is used across fibre optic lines - the type of cabling that underpins much of the broadband infrastructure that's already in place in our homes and offices.

http://www.sciencealert.com/how-a-new-type-of-laser-has-become-a-data-transfer-speed-record-breaker

:)

JSmith :ninja:

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11 minutes ago, JSmith said:

 

That's the fastest ever data transmission speed over a new type of laser called a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), which is used across fibre optic lines - the type of cabling that underpins much of the broadband infrastructure that's already in place in our homes and offices.

:)

JSmith :ninja:

Yeh ... across fibre optic ... not across copper wires in the FTTN method !!!

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29 minutes ago, MrC said:

not across copper wires in the FTTN method !

Nah, for sure. That's why I quoted and was discussing optical fibre. I just wish this stupid govt hadn't stuffed the NBN up... Labor's model t'was pretty close to perfect

As Ralphi said, copper will never reach the potential speeds of fibre.

JSmith :ninja:

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7 hours ago, MrC said:
7 hours ago, GaryCook said:

I'm on Telstra Foxtel HFC cable and get 130 mbps on a good day/time and it never gets below 40 mbps.

 

Cheers

Gary

I have my fingers crossed 

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On 16/08/2016 at 0:51 PM, JSmith said:

Nah...

Even if it were, do you imply it should be left there?

JSmith :ninja:

Old lead cabling was left in the ground for a while before it was removed (I worked for a mob who removed the stuff - could be the reason for my dodgy back these days!).

I think they'll do the same here - unless it's in the way, they'll just leave it in-situ until it's worth removing.

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On ‎2‎/‎09‎/‎2016 at 3:43 PM, pgdownload said:

I'm a bit surprised at the number. The HFC speed is usually limited by the ISP according to what plan you're on. I think 100Mbps is  the top tier at the moment. Perhaps Telstra just flick all the switches to max on the upper plan. 

FWIW without knowing your home data consumption, I've found 100Mbps of little practical value for the extra $240 a year it costs. Few households would encounter many bottle necks at 30Mbps so long as it was a solid 30Mbps.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

We use lots of bandwidth, albeit mostly wifi, there's generally an iPad or 2, a couple of iPhones, 2 x Apple TV's and 2 x Foxtel boxes plus the MacMini of course.  But not a lot of data, 200 gb a month does us just fine.   My son, a professional photographer, used to use up the data, but since he has his own place we haven't hit the ceiling.

 

Cheers

Gary

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Davmel has cleared up some common misconceptions about FTTN speed limitations in another thread. See:

 

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Just an ad hoc titbit of info. I don't know whether it's typical. Holidaying recently in the north of the northern beaches region of Sydney (in the former local government area known as Pittwater), I noticed NBN cabinets on the surburban roads I was walking along. The cabinets were at about 400 metre intervals. Along the particular streets I walked along, I observed that the housing was predominantly detached dwellings, with a very small number of low rise apartment blocks.

I'd assume that that sort of cabinet spacing should support pretty reasonable download (and upload) speeds.

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On 29/12/2016 at 5:11 PM, MLXXX said:

Just an ad hoc titbit of info. I don't know whether it's typical. Holidaying recently in the north of the northern beaches region of Sydney (in the former local government area known as Pittwater), I noticed NBN cabinets on the surburban roads I was walking along. The cabinets were at about 400 metre intervals. Along the particular streets I walked along, I observed that the housing was predominantly detached dwellings, with a very small number of low rise apartment blocks.

I'd assume that that sort of cabinet spacing should support pretty reasonable download (and upload) speeds.

So long as the copper/terminations are in good nick. 

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The old copper cables connect to the FFTN cabinet instead of going all the way back to the exchange, which is how they increase the speed. There is a fibre optic cable from the FFTN cabinet back to the exchange. Note that each FFTN is powered from the street's electricity supply, so if there is a black out in your street, you loose the phone and internet.

Whatever speed maximum speed you get it can never increase. Those who are fibre to the premises can increase speed in the future by changing the equipment at each end. Increases in speed is achieved by using different colours of light which are independent of the existing connections.

Now 10 Gbit/s is now being rolled out in regional NZ using existing fibre to the premisis cables. You cannot do this with the copper in FFTN.

http://northpower.com/news/2017/northpower-fibre-and-calix-showcase-ng-pon2

Alanh

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3 hours ago, alanh said:

Note that each FFTN is powered from the street's electricity supply, so if there is a black out in your street, you loose the phone and internet.

Alanh

Not quite true.
Those cabinets are indeed powered from the street poles, HOWEVER, when the power goes off you do not lose phone/internet as such. If you have a look in the cabinets you will see on the bottom shelf a bunch of orange thingies that look like batteries. They are in fact as such so the cabinet does not go down - for a while at least.
The most likely way you will lose your phone/internet is if you do not have an alternate power supply at your house/dwelling etc such as, at the least, a UPS. If you have one of them you can carry on for as long as it holds up or you can get another power supply to it or the mains come back, and then for however long the cabinet backup lasts.
I have no figures for how long the batteries in the cabinets can provide back up.

Edited by hrh

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3 hours ago, alanh said:

Whatever speed maximum speed you get it can never increase.

I like FTTP as much as the next person, but FTTN isn't an EOL technology. It will improve. Its just doesn't compare well with fibre can improve a 100 fold with a few small upgrades.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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What company will want to invest millions to make a slight improvement in FFTN when fibre is so widespread worldwide. In addition only those who want >100 Mbit/s have to buy a new modem and the same will have to occur at the exchange. Everybody else can stick with their single colour fibre signal if they wish. As more fibre is made the price is dropping making it even less likely that there will be any investment in faster FFTN.  Lets face it, it's old technology going the way of the CD, DVD, analog TV.;..

Alanh

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