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Oppo Uhd 4K Player

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a bit more on...

 

"Connecting the 205 Directly to a Power Amp -- Part 2

In my post above I talked about "impedance" considerations in connecting the Analog outs of the OPPO UDP-205 directly to a Power Amp -- no pre-amp in between. Now I want to talk about Volume.

A key difference in connecting directly to a Power Amp is that the Amp is not likely to offer Volume control -- or call it "Gain" control. That means you will be relying on the Analog output Volume control provided by the 205 itself.

Power Amps have different "Gain" characteristics, and if the Gain of the Amp is too large (and your speakers too "efficient") you will need to use a very low Volume setting in the OPPO to achieve a comfortable listening level. That raises the question whether a low Volume setting in the OPPO affects the audio quality. And if so, how low is TOO low?

For folks new to this, an important concept here is that the Volume control in a device like the OPPO does not "amplify" the output. The 205 is designed to put out a "full scale" signal. That is, the max Volume setting of the 205 (a Volume of 100 -- or the Output "FIXED" setting, which does the same thing) puts out the Analog audio signal the player is DESIGNED to put out. It's very BEST signal.

Instead, lowering Volume below 100 "attenuates" the full scale output -- lowering the output volume below that of the "best" signal. But how does that affect audio quality? Does it even make a noticeable difference? There are two considerations: Dynamic Range and Noise Floor.

The first takeaway here should be that Dynamic Range is not a problem in the 205. Here's how we get to that result.

The Analog output Volume control in the 205 is implemented at very high quality -- in the 32-bit DACs of the player. That is the Dynamic Range of the Volume control itself is 32-bit. But the max dynamic range of the content you can PLAY in the OPPO is 24-bit. That gives us 8 bits extra.

Each bit of precision is equivalent to 6dB. So that says you could lower Volume by -48dB below full scale and have ZERO effect on the Dynamic Range of the Analog output stage for the content this player can play.

But wait! There's more!

The Noise Floor of the 205 is -120dB below full scale. That is to say any portion of the content which is recorded -120dB, or lower, below full scale is going to be "in the noise".

The maximum potential Dynamic Range of a 24-bit digital audio stream is 144dB. So the lowest 24dB of that will be "masked" by the Noise Floor. What's left gives the maximum perceivable Dynamic Range of the Analog outs: 120dB.

Combining these two results says you could lower Volume a whopping -72dB and still have no effect on the perceived Dynamic Range (i.e., after amplification to a comfortable listening level through a high quality Amp).

----------------------------------------

So what's the problem? The PROBLEM is that -- and this is another key concept -- attenuating the output signal does NOT also lower the Noise Floor! So if you set volume -72dB down (a Volume setting of 28 in the OPPO), you will have lowered the signal you WANT to hear 72dB closer to the Noise Floor. Or to put it another way, you've raised the Noise Floor to -48dB!

When you put that Analog output signal through a high Gain Power Amp to get things back to a comfortable listening level that Noise Floor -- now only -48dB below the loudest portions of the content -- ALSO gets amplified. And may very well become noticeable, particularly in a quiet listening room.

So that raises the question of how high is too high for the Noise Floor? There's no pat answer for that. But as a straw man, let's suggest that for high quality listening you don't want the Noise Floor to be closer than -90dB below the loudest portions of the content.

As I said above, the Noise Floor of the 205 is -120dB below full scale.  So that gives us 30dB of Volume control to play with!

In the 205, Volume is implemented as -1.0dB per step below Volume 100. So that says you should TARGET a setup where you can get a comfortable listening level without having to lower Volume in the 205 below Volume 70. Higher is better, but 70 is fine.

If you decide you prefer to be more or less conservative regarding this Noise Floor straw man, you can do the easy math to adjust that TARGET Volume to taste.

------------------------------------------

So what if the Gain in *YOUR* Power Amp is so high that Volume 70 in the OPPO wakes the neighbors and knocks plaster off the walls?  Well that says that your Power Amp is not, by itself, a good "match" for the *DIRECT* output of the 205.

One solution, of course is to put a pre-amp between the OPPO and your Power Amp. The pre-amp provides Volume control and so you can leave the Analog output Volume of the OPPO at 100.

Another solution is to invest in some high quality "attenuators" which you will put, in-line, between the OPPO and the Power Amp, so that you can keep Volume in the OPPO at 70 or above (assuming our straw man example here) while achieving a comfortable listening level.

-------------------------------------------

Now does that meant the signal is going to turn to crap if you lower Volume below 70? Of course not. You may very well want to use lower Volumes when you are not doing "critical listening" for example -- perhaps late at night depending on the persnicketiness of the neighbors. In most such cases you will probably NOT notice a decrease in audio quality.

But if you TARGET a setup where you are commonly using, say, Volume 30 for critical listening then you are not using the hardware of the 205 to best advantage.
--Bob"

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1 hour ago, :) al said:

a bit more on...

 

"Connecting the 205 Directly to a Power Amp -- Part 2

In my post above I talked about "impedance" considerations in connecting the Analog outs of the OPPO UDP-205 directly to a Power Amp -- no pre-amp in between. Now I want to talk about Volume.

A key difference in connecting directly to a Power Amp is that the Amp is not likely to offer Volume control -- or call it "Gain" control. That means you will be relying on the Analog output Volume control provided by the 205 itself.

Power Amps have different "Gain" characteristics, and if the Gain of the Amp is too large (and your speakers too "efficient") you will need to use a very low Volume setting in the OPPO to achieve a comfortable listening level. That raises the question whether a low Volume setting in the OPPO affects the audio quality. And if so, how low is TOO low?

For folks new to this, an important concept here is that the Volume control in a device like the OPPO does not "amplify" the output. The 205 is designed to put out a "full scale" signal. That is, the max Volume setting of the 205 (a Volume of 100 -- or the Output "FIXED" setting, which does the same thing) puts out the Analog audio signal the player is DESIGNED to put out. It's very BEST signal.

Instead, lowering Volume below 100 "attenuates" the full scale output -- lowering the output volume below that of the "best" signal. But how does that affect audio quality? Does it even make a noticeable difference? There are two considerations: Dynamic Range and Noise Floor.

The first takeaway here should be that Dynamic Range is not a problem in the 205. Here's how we get to that result.

The Analog output Volume control in the 205 is implemented at very high quality -- in the 32-bit DACs of the player. That is the Dynamic Range of the Volume control itself is 32-bit. But the max dynamic range of the content you can PLAY in the OPPO is 24-bit. That gives us 8 bits extra.

Each bit of precision is equivalent to 6dB. So that says you could lower Volume by -48dB below full scale and have ZERO effect on the Dynamic Range of the Analog output stage for the content this player can play.

But wait! There's more!

The Noise Floor of the 205 is -120dB below full scale. That is to say any portion of the content which is recorded -120dB, or lower, below full scale is going to be "in the noise".

The maximum potential Dynamic Range of a 24-bit digital audio stream is 144dB. So the lowest 24dB of that will be "masked" by the Noise Floor. What's left gives the maximum perceivable Dynamic Range of the Analog outs: 120dB.

Combining these two results says you could lower Volume a whopping -72dB and still have no effect on the perceived Dynamic Range (i.e., after amplification to a comfortable listening level through a high quality Amp).

----------------------------------------

So what's the problem? The PROBLEM is that -- and this is another key concept -- attenuating the output signal does NOT also lower the Noise Floor! So if you set volume -72dB down (a Volume setting of 28 in the OPPO), you will have lowered the signal you WANT to hear 72dB closer to the Noise Floor. Or to put it another way, you've raised the Noise Floor to -48dB!

When you put that Analog output signal through a high Gain Power Amp to get things back to a comfortable listening level that Noise Floor -- now only -48dB below the loudest portions of the content -- ALSO gets amplified. And may very well become noticeable, particularly in a quiet listening room.

So that raises the question of how high is too high for the Noise Floor? There's no pat answer for that. But as a straw man, let's suggest that for high quality listening you don't want the Noise Floor to be closer than -90dB below the loudest portions of the content.

As I said above, the Noise Floor of the 205 is -120dB below full scale.  So that gives us 30dB of Volume control to play with!

In the 205, Volume is implemented as -1.0dB per step below Volume 100. So that says you should TARGET a setup where you can get a comfortable listening level without having to lower Volume in the 205 below Volume 70. Higher is better, but 70 is fine.

If you decide you prefer to be more or less conservative regarding this Noise Floor straw man, you can do the easy math to adjust that TARGET Volume to taste.

------------------------------------------

So what if the Gain in *YOUR* Power Amp is so high that Volume 70 in the OPPO wakes the neighbors and knocks plaster off the walls?  Well that says that your Power Amp is not, by itself, a good "match" for the *DIRECT* output of the 205.

One solution, of course is to put a pre-amp between the OPPO and your Power Amp. The pre-amp provides Volume control and so you can leave the Analog output Volume of the OPPO at 100.

Another solution is to invest in some high quality "attenuators" which you will put, in-line, between the OPPO and the Power Amp, so that you can keep Volume in the OPPO at 70 or above (assuming our straw man example here) while achieving a comfortable listening level.

-------------------------------------------

Now does that meant the signal is going to turn to crap if you lower Volume below 70? Of course not. You may very well want to use lower Volumes when you are not doing "critical listening" for example -- perhaps late at night depending on the persnicketiness of the neighbors. In most such cases you will probably NOT notice a decrease in audio quality.

But if you TARGET a setup where you are commonly using, say, Volume 30 for critical listening then you are not using the hardware of the 205 to best advantage.
--Bob"

 

There is a couple of things despite the maths involved.  

ESS (Mark Mallison) said using there in build volume has no effect at low volumes because it's 32bits involved and has a better bit control and less resolution loss than 24 bit DAC chips and will functioned better than any expensive analog volume pot whether it be a tapered resistor or a DACT.  

I agree with him that it's better than any mechanical pot as there is not wear or tear.  However I've tested the 105 volume control out and compared it to a NAD M51 that uses a 35bit digital control.  No guess in which one is better.  Then I went one better than the M51 using a Sanders Preamp, this uses a BB PGA2130, a digital controlled analog volume chip, this up the resolution again in low volume.

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37 minutes ago, Addicted to music said:

There is a couple of things despite the maths involved.  

ESS (Mark Mallison) said using there in build volume has no effect at low volumes because it's 32bits involved and has a better bit control and less resolution loss than 24 bit DAC chips and will functioned better than any expensive analog volume pot whether it be a tapered resistor or a DACT.  

I agree with him that it's better than any mechanical pot as there is not wear or tear.  However I've tested the 105 volume control out and compared it to a NAD M51 that uses a 35bit digital control.  No guess in which one is better.  Then I went one better than the M51 using a Sanders Preamp, this uses a BB PGA2130, a digital controlled analog volume chip, this up the resolution again in low volume.

 

I have absolutely no doubt in my mind the importance a pure analog pre amp plays in systems. however I though best to post what i did as pretty important for those that might be exploring or deciding to use something like the oppo as a pre amp. even though as per bob it was never ever designed for that role. and hence some important considerations :) 

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I notice CAV posting they have theirs, so must be in the country :)

 

18118898_1414982478558528_66718404051224

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Todds Hi-Fi in Brisbane received their first UDP-205 today - will be on the demo shelf tomorrow.

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3 hours ago, :) al said:

I notice CAV posting they have theirs, so must be in the country :)

 

18118898_1414982478558528_66718404051224

 

They heard it won't work until you download the yap.

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25 minutes ago, BioBrian said:

They heard it won't work until you download the yap.

 

Post of the day...Bio

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5 hours ago, BioBrian said:

 

They heard it won't work until you download the yap.

 

Oppo firmware that works...

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Good tips from Bob on setting up for use of the analog outs,

 

"Notes on Setting Up for Analog Output

For folks new to the OPPO players, these notes may help save you some head scratching.

As mentioned in my post above regarding direct connection to a Power Amplifier, the "normal" way to wire Analog out of the OPPO is to connect to the inputs of a pre-amp -- which also includes the Analog inputs of an AVR since they always have a pre-amp in those.

When doing so, the USUAL Volume setting for the OPPO is the maximum value of 100 -- or setting Output Volume to FIXED, which does the same thing.

However, depending on the headroom designed into the inputs of your pre-amp, a Volume 100 output signal may possibly "clip" the inputs of the pre-amp in the loudest audio passages you play. The symptom would be a sense of "harshness" in the loudest audio passages, which cleans right up if you lower the OPPO's Volume a bit.

If you hear that, what you should do is test a selection of your loudest audio content and lower Volume on the OPPO just enough to insure you don't have clipping. It will usually only take a few steps reduction of Volume: -1dB to -3dB, meaning Volume 99 to 97. If you DON'T hear clipping in your loudest audio passages, that simply means your pre-amp has enough headroom designed in to prevent it, and you can leave Volume in the OPPO at 100.

Once you have found the Volume setting in the OPPO which insures against clipping of your loudest audio passages that is a "set and forget" setting. I.e., use that same Volume for everything you play. (Of course while using the Volume control in your pre-amp to achieve a comfortable listening level.)

NOTE 1: If you hear "harshness" which does *NOT* go away when you lower output Volume in the OPPO just a few steps, then that's some other problem. For example you may be overdriving your speakers or you may even have a damaged speaker.

NOTE 2: As mentioned in my post above, it is also best practice to set your individual speaker Volume Trims in the OPPO so that none of them are in positive dB territory. If after doing a check you discover that one or more speakers needs a +dB trim, simply lower ALL the trims the same amount so that the largest trim is 0dB and all the rest are -dB trims.

----------------------------------------

The Analog Subwoofer output of the OPPO carries both LFE channel content (the .1 of 5.1 or 7.1 tracks) and bass steered from the main speaker channels due to Crossover processing. Bass steering happens for speakers you have set to SMALL in the Analog Speaker Configuration settings in the OPPO. The Crossover frequency can also be set.

NOTE 1: Crossover is not a sudden change. It rolls into effect over the span of about an octave -- a factor of two in frequency. So if you set a Crossover frequency of 80Hz, that means the main speakers are carrying audio in their individual channels above 80Hz, and that between 80Hz and 40Hz the audio is carried by a mix of the speaker and the subwoofer outputs. Below 40Hz the audio in that speaker channel is carried almost entirely by the subwoofer channel. The upshot is that you should pick a Crossover at last twice as high as the lower frequency limit for good quality audio from your speakers. If that's 30Hz then the Crossover should be 60Hz or higher. It is also wise to not set the Crossover too high, as that steers, for example, male voices into the subwoofer. In addition, the audio from the subwoofer becomes "localizable" at higher frequencies, which means you hear audio coming from the direction of the sub instead of from the direction of the speaker where it is intended. Low bass frequencies on the other hand are not "localizable". The Sub produces low bass by "pressurizing" the entire listening space -- setting up "standing waves". And so that low bass appears to come "from everywhere" -- with no set direction. In particular, not from the location of the sub. The bottom line is that when using Crossover at all, the Crossover frequencies between 60Hz and 90Hz are your best bet. Pick the one that sounds best given your speakers and the "bass response" characteristics of your listening room.

NOTE 2: The industry standard nomenclature of SMALL vs. LARGE is unfortunate. It has nothing to do with the physical size of your speakers. It is simply a way to specify whether you want Crossover processing to happen (SMALL) or not (LARGE).

----------------------------------------

The LFE channel just mentioned is special in that it is a channel designed to carry *LOUD* bass. *ALL* the speaker channels are unlimited in how low they can go in frequency. You can put the lowest of the low bass in any or all of them. But the energy necessary to hear (or more likely, feel) very low bass is pretty significant. And if you put *LOUD* bass like that in the normal speaker channels you would clip those channels.

So the LFE channel is recorded -10dB down from the normal speaker channels -- giving it 10dB additional headroom to carry *LOUD* bass.

The rules of authoring multi-channel audio are that the mixers can not assume listeners will have a sub. So all "critical" bass in the sound design also has to be in the main speaker channels. But *LOUD* bass has its home in the LFE channel.

The Subwoofer output of the OPPO preserves that recording level for LFE. That is, the signal that comes out on the Subwoofer RCA jack is at least -10dB below what comes out on the main speaker RCA jacks. This is so that you can feed the Sub signal through a multi-channel pre-amp (like the multi-channel inputs of an AVR) without clipping that Sub input jack on the AVR.

But before the audio goes to the speakers, "Sub Boost" has to be applied. I.e., that signal from the Sub output jack of the OPPO has to be raised +10dB so it is back up to the same level as is authored into the main speaker channels.

By default, almost all AVRs apply +10dB Sub Boost automatically. If you are using different electronics -- perhaps running the Sub output of the OPPO directly to your Subwoofer - you need to arrange for that Sub Boost yourself. For example by raising the Volume knob on the Sub itself.

An important concept here is that Sub Boost should be applied *EXTERNAL TO* the player. That is, it is not a good idea to try to achieve the needed Sub Boost by raising the Subwoofer Volume Trim in the OPPO. Why? That clipping I just mentioned.

----------------------------------------

If Crossover processing is engaged in the OPPO, there's more audio than just LFE going out on the Analog Subwoofer output jack. You now also have that jack carrying bass "steered" from the channels of speakers you have designated as SMALL.

To accommodate that, whenever Crossover is active in the OPPO an additional -5dB of attenuation is applied to the Analog Subwoofer output jack -- again to prevent "clipping" of that input of a pre-amp. That means the Sub Boost you need to get it back to the level of the main speaker output is now +15dB. To summarize:

1) If no Crossover happening, external Sub Boost should be +10dB.
2) If Crossover happening, external Sub Boost should be +15dB.

How do you achieve that additional +5dB? Well some AVRs and pre-amp processors will have an adjustable Sub Boost setting. Simply change that from +10dB to +15dB.

Otherwise, achieve the additional +5dB by raising the Volume knob on the Sub itself.

NOTE: If you are doing Analog "pass through" in your AVR, raising the Volume on the Sub to achieve the right level of Sub Boost may result in too MUCH bass when you are playing content via digital connections. The solution to THAT problem is to first set Volume on your Sub as needed to get the Analog connection to work. Then in the digital audio settings of your AVR or pre-pro, REDUCE Sub output the same amount to compensate. In most cases, that adjustment will not affect the Analog "pass through" levels and so you now have achieved correct Sub levels both for Analog "pass through" from the OPPO and for Digital content played through your setup.

-------------------------------------------------

There is a gotcha here for folks who want to play multi-channel DSD content using DSD-Direct-to-Analog Conversion. When the player is set to send DSD directly to the DACs for Analog output (i.e., without first converting that DSD to LPCM) no processing of the audio is possible. No down-mixing, no speaker distance adjustment, and in particular no Crossover processing. All you can do with DSD-Direct-to-Analog Conversion is Volume control.

And that means even if you have some speakers set to SMALL in the OPPO, they are treated as LARGE when you have DSD going directly to the DACs.

And THAT means the required Sub Boost is now +10dB -- because no Crossover is engaged.

NOTE 1: For those familiar with the design flaw in SACDs regarding LFE level for multi-channel tracks, suffice it to say the OPPO compensates for that automatically. That is when you play a multi-channel LFE track the .1 channel is treated exactly the same as the .1 channel of normal content. This is true regardless of whether you are sending DSD or LPCM to the DACs for Analog output of that multi-channel SACD track. The same -10dB level is produced on the OPPO's Analog output path, meaning the same, default +10dB Sub Boost is needed for both types of content -- plus the additional +5dB if the Crossover is engaged.

NOTE 2: If you screw this up and apply +15dB Sub Boost during DSD-Direct-to-Analog Conversion instead of the correct +10dB you may not actually hear any problem! Why? Because of that design flaw in the SACD spec I just mentioned. It has caused so many headaches that many studios author their 5.1 SACD tracks with *NOTHING* in the .1 channel! I.e., they author ALL the bass into the 5 main speaker channels. So it is actually 5.0 content packaged as a 5.1 track. So with nothing in the LFE channel -- and no Crossover happening from the main speaker channels -- the Subwoofer output of the OPPO is silent. Meaning there's nothing for the incorrect Sub Boost level to screw up. In the alternative, you may hear WEAK bass (instead of too much). That's because you've gotten used to Crossover processing supporting your main speakers by sending their lowest bass to the Sub. But that doesn't happen when you use DSD-Direct-to-Analog Conversion, so you are now totally dependent on the low bass output characteristics of your main speakers.

-------------------------------------------------

All of the above is complicated to read, but checking whether you've got things set up CORRECTLY is actually pretty easy. Simply play a calibration track and check!

For checking your non-DSD setup, I recommend the LPCM 5.1 or 7.1 Channel ID tracks on AIX Audio Calibration, Blu-ray (available direct from OPPO).

For checking your DSD setup, I recommend tracks 43-48 -- the speaker level tracks -- found on the 5.1 content of "Stay in Tune with PentaTone", SACD, available on Amazon. Important note: Do NOT use the speaker ID tracks found earlier on that disc for this. Even though those sound the same, the LFE channel for those has an artificial +10dB increase "to make the subwoofer easier to hear". Use tracks 43-48 instead.

It is best to check this using a Sound Pressure Level (SPL) meter. Set that to Slow response and "C" weighting, and point it straight up towards the ceiling while held at seated ear height at your normal, center seating position. Adjust Volume so that the test tracks are producing roughly 75dB SPL.

If things are set correctly, the main speakers *AND* the Subwoofer will all produce the *SAME* SPL reading with these test tracks. It doesn't matter HOW you have achieved the correct Sub Boost; if you get the same SPL from the Sub as from the main speakers then things are set correctly.

Even set to Slow response, the readings will bounce around a bit, particularly for the Sub. So just do a mental average of them as you check.
--Bob"

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10 hours ago, Addicted to music said:

 

Oppo firmware that works...

 

Yap :D

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It's running exact same firmware as the 203,must bugs sorted now ,2 remaining issues
The HDMI in still has lip sync issues
The strip meta data is still a work in progress
Otherwise pretty solid !!
Cheers Muri

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19 minutes ago, muriwai said:

It's running exact same firmware as the 203,must bugs sorted now ,2 remaining issues
The HDMI in still has lip sync issues
The strip meta data is still a work in progress
Otherwise pretty solid !!
Cheers Muri

 

Muri you still needing to run yours on 2inch thick of sound absorption to fix the drop out and glitch issues you and Marty mentioned earlier in this thread ?

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Hi Al,yes as it sits right next to a Seaton F2 dual 15" sub,I ended up going to Clark rubber,bought some round foam tubes about 1 mtr long(similar to the swimming pool spaghetti tubes)and cut 4 pieces at 40 mm long and double sided stiky tape them under the oppo feet,the foam is black so looks good and works a treat,I have ordered a Seymour AV AT screen from USA so when that arrives its the last piece of the puzzle,I will be hoping u can come up for a demo and help me to dial in a good picture !!

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8 minutes ago, muriwai said:

Hi Al,yes as it sits right next to a Seaton F2 dual 15" sub,I ended up going to Clark rubber,bought some round foam tubes about 1 mtr long(similar to the swimming pool spaghetti tubes)and cut 4 pieces at 40 mm long and double sided stiky tape them under the oppo feet,the foam is black so looks good and works a treat,I have ordered a Seymour AV AT screen from USA so when that arrives its the last piece of the puzzle,I will be hoping u can come up for a demo and help me to dial in a good picture !!emoji6.png

 

Thanks muri for clarifying. My player sits between twin 15" subs too. It Sh!ts me though that the oppo is so susceptible accoustically. When the pana that replaced in the same spot been glitch free for months ! Same with cheapo sammy before. I even ran the sammy and pana sitting on one of my subs for a while no issue. I definitely won't be buying the oppo without demoing again to make sure. But also hope the 205 being more substantial again also helps !

 

great to hear have the screen on way. Only to happy to come across to help in any way and am sure it's going to be a knock out of a setup once together :)

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205's are in. Saw one today at Class A. Didn't give much attention as was short on time


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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not sure really how much of an upgrade the 205 is over the 105 audio wise reading this note from owners thread over in avs,

 

Official OPPO UDP-205 UHD Blu-ray Player Owner's Thread

"I'm actually debating and thinking about returning the Oppo 205 and just keeping my 105. I paid retail and it's just not a big enough upgrade over the 105. I'm not getting my uhd tv until later in the year and in the meantime maybe I can get one later down the line discounted online. It works and sounds great but so did my 105. emoji482.png to all enjoying there new player. "

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      The new LUMAS Gallery app takes art into the digital dimension - and opens up new horizons. It allows you to enjoy selected works of art by internationally renowned artists - such as the Cuba series by the Stuttgart-based photographer Werner Pawlok - in high-resolution Ultra HD quality on your television screen. The LUMAS TV app is available on the new Loewe Reference TV home screen, so you can start selecting pictures straight away - using the Loewe remote control. Browse photographs, graphics, illustrations, digital art or paintings. When you find a picture that appeals, you can display it as a fixed image (for a maximum of 24 hours) or enjoy as part of a slide show.
       
      Quality Sound
      The Loewe Reference has a sound quality to rival even high-end hi-fi and home cinema systems: tangible bass, vivid middle, precise highs and an exceptionally wide dynamic range – the traditional hallmarks of Loewe Sound. The Loewe Reference sets particularly high standards. An integrated soundbar with eight speakers generates crystal-clear sound with a rich 120 watts of music output. In combination with the specially designed bass reflex box and integrated 5.1 audio decoder with Dolby Digital and DTS, the result is an impressive home cinema … and a perfect home concert hall. The Loewe Reference's cinema surround mode conveys amazingly authentic surround sound. At the touch of a button, it also allows you to switch between film and music mode. Special algorithms calculate the optimal overall sound setup for each situation: as powerful as possible while retaining sensitivity – ideal for cinema buffs and music fans.
       
      Loewe Mobile Recording ... any time, any place.
      You're stuck in traffic or can't get away from a meeting...you won't make it home in time for your favorite programme. You're out with friends...and you suddenly realise your weekly drama is about to start. The Loewe Reference takes the stress out of situations such as these. Loewe Mobile recording allows you to easily record programmes on the integrated Loewe DR+ 1 TB hard disk, even if you don't happen to be at home. Leaving you free to enjoy your favorite programmes at a more convenient time! All you need is a smartphone and an Internet connection. Simply open the new free Loewe Smart Assist app, select the program from the programme guide and press 'record'... Your Loewe TV will then take care of the rest. When you get back home, you can even watch your recorded programmes on your patio, or tucked up in bed using a tablet computer.
       
      Pictures:






    • By HDobsession
      Item: Epson EH TW9300W projector
      Location: Mitcham, (Melbourne) Victoria
      Price: $2700 ono
      Item Condition: Immaculate
      Reason for selling: Upgrade to Epson 9400W
      Payment Method: Pickup - Cash, Paypal, COD Only
      Extra Info: less that 300hours (thought it was 100 where did the time go?) on the globe absolutely immaculate projector. Amazing 4K enhanced images.  Has been installed on ceiling mount so no bumps, scratches. It looks new. With warranty until 23rd June 2020! Includes a bonus new globe! Includes receipt for warranty.
       
      Includes 
      - Projector TW 9300W
      - Extra globe (brand new in box)
      - 2 pairs of Epson 3D rechargeable glasses
      - Wireless transmitter (basically unused)
      - Warranty with receipt until June 2020
      - Power cable
      - remote 
       
      I am more than happy to answer any questions. I'm only selling because I'm looking to upgrade to the next model. This unit is in perfect condition. 
       
       
       









       
      SOLD
    • By Jabz10
      Selling my Sony VPL-VW520ES Native 4K Projector
      https://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=1489613893
      Happy to sell privately. 
    • By oztheatre
      Item: The all new native 4K Sony VPL-VW270ES 4K Cinema Projector (new 2019 model with all new lens) and Majestic Screen package is now available.
      Genuine Australian stock! This model is available in black or white.
      Groundbreaking price for native 4K cinema projection!
      RRP at $10,317 based on package with 100 inch Majestic Screen at full RRP.
      With 2 RF 3D Glasses and premium Majestic Evo4K Screen and top of the line Peerless geared projector mount! 
      Priced From: $8289 inc GST and delivery Australia wide.
      Payment Method: Pickup - Direct deposit, cards 1%.

      Extra Info: This model doesn't have the lens memory feature that the 570ES has, however it has motorised zoom, shift and focus so you could use a 235 screen, it would just take a little longer to switch between formats when required.. perhaps 30-40 seconds using the remote. Otherwise a 16:9 format screen would mean no changing sizes or messing around with the remote.
      Pictures: 
       
       
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